Fenil and Bollywood

Archive for August 2009

Cast: SALMAN KHAN, ASIN, AJAY DEVGAN, RANNVIJAY

Producer and Director: VIPUL AMRUTLAL SHAH

London Dreams

Maqbool Fida Hussain to paint Madhuri Dixit and Amrita Rao on the same canvas; will soon make a film with the two in lead roles
By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 28, 2009)

Madhuri Dixit

Amrita Rao

After painting several solos of his favourite ladies — Madhuri Dixit and Amrita Rao, legendary artist MF Hussain is now geared up to paint the two together on the same canvas for the very first time. The inspiration for this painting comes from a film, which will star Amrita and Madhuri, and will be made by Hussain.

“Hussain has even asked Madhuri and Amrita to visit him during Diwali this year to discuss the logistics of the film,” said a source.

Confirming the story, Hussain said, “I do a lot of combination paintings. I have started working on the Madhuri and Amrita painting. It should be ready in a month’s time.”

Along with the painting, Hussain has also begun working on the film.

MF Hussain

Confirming his plans of making a film with the two Bollywood actresses, Hussain said, “It’s a bit early to divulge any details but yes, there is one such project in the pipeline. I want to make a film starring Madhuri and Amrita. I believe that my painting is incomplete unless I make a film on it.”

When asked if unlike his previous films Gaja Gamini (2000) and Meenaxi: A Tale Of Three Cities (2004), he would now like to make a commercial film, he replied, “No. I don’t want anybody to dictate what I have to make.”

Priyanka Chopra, without concern for her health, interrupted her well-deserved vacation and flew to Mumbai only for a day to dub for What’s Your Rashee?

By Vickey Lalwani (MIMBAI MIRROR; August 28, 2009)
Priyanka Chopra is evidently committed to her projects, as she takes a break from a break to dub for What’s Your Rashee? Either she is a workaholic or health is currently not high on her list of priorities. After suffering a long period of ill health coupled with exhaustion, which needed hospitalisation for a few days, Priyanka has returned from her holiday to Mumbai only for a day to fulfill a work commitment.

Priyanka had left for an unknown foreign destination last Wednesday, but she interrupted her holiday and flew into the city early on Thursday morning. After a brief rest, she headed to the studios to dub for Ashutosh Gowariker’s What’s Your Rashee? She plans to take off for the second leg of her vacation after a day of dubbing.

A source says, “The dubbing of What’s Your Rashee? was so important that Priyanka just could not refuse. While a few of her friends who were with her on the holiday told her to take it easy, Priyanka still chose to make a hectic dash.”

Last evening, Priyanka’s father confirmed the news, “Yes, Priyanka has come back. She had to dub for What’s Your Rashee?”

When asked if Priyanka was facing a burn out and concentrating too much on work, Dr Chopra said, “Priyanka is absolutely fine. Work is fun. Aur kaam bhi to important hai. Requirement thi.”

Priyanka’s parents are accompanying her on the second leg of her holiday. “Yes, my wife and I are going with her,” Dr Chopra added.

Not once in six years, has Priyanka Chopra taken it easy. This was her first vacation, which was supposed to be really relaxing. But some people just don’t seem to know how to relax.

Sanjay Dutt’s refusal to grow a beard for Lamhaa and reluctance to give more dates leaves producer Bunty Walia with no choice but to do away with the actor’s additional scenes
By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 28, 2009)

Bunty Walia

Bunty Walia, who had categorically stated not too long ago that he needs Sanjay Dutt for an additional four-five days to complete his forthcoming film Lamhaa, has now decided to release the film without shooting those portions with the actor. Moreover, Bunty and Sanjay are not even spending too much time together as they used to earlier. The evening drink and gupshup sessions at Sanjay’s Bandra residence are all a thing of the past.

The story goes that Bunty wanted Sanjay Dutt to grow a full beard once again to shoot for the additional portions but Sanju, who had shaved off his beard for his look in other films, was in no mood to grow it again to suit Bunty’s schedule. Even though Bunty initially waited for a long time and repeatedly coaxed Sanjay to shoot the pending portions, he got tired of waiting and eventually decided to do away with the additional portions to be shot with Sanjay.

The reason why Bunty can’t wait any longer is that he has borrowed a lot of money and has also sold a few of his cars to meet the budget of Lamhaa. Any further delay would be a bad financial decision.

Rahul Dholakia, director of Lamhaa, said, “We finished Sanjay Dutt’s portions in January. We are now editing the film.”

Bunty claimed that Sanjay was gracious enough to ask him if he wanted him to grow the beard again. He also claimed that Sanjay and he have not had a fall out. However, he did not deny that he seldom spends time with Sanjay these days. He said, “Sanjay has been busy shooting for the past six months all over the world. Where is the time to spend with him? Also, he is off drinks now. You want me to land up in somebody’s house and force him to drink?”

Sanjay Dutt

“I had a feeling that we need Sanju for a couple of extra days to shoot for Lamhaa but Rahul proved me wrong. Recently, Rahul came back from the US and I checked with him. He has seen the scenes shot for the film and he doesn’t require any dates from Sanjay. Whatever we had shot with Sanjay for 40 days earlier is enough for the film. Besides, I am a stand alone producer who doesn’t have any corporate backing for Lamhaa. My money has come from the bank for which I am paying heavy interest. I can’t wait any longer,” added Bunty.

Source: BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

By Taran Adarsh, August 28, 2009 – 09:28 IST

[English, with generous dose of Tamil]
Recall the cinema of 1970s. The villains would spray bullets at the hero, even throw bombs at him, but the hero would come out unscathed. The hero, in turn, would fire in the air, the bullet would hit the lamp post, bounce towards the villain and enter his skull. The hero was truly a superhero.

Welcome to the crazy, madcap world of QUICK GUN MURUGAN. In this film, the hero and villain are at loggerheads. The fight is between vegetarian and non-vegetarian [meals]. Here, the villain wants to make the best dosa in town and kidnaps women who have the perfect recipe for making delicious dosas.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

QUICK GUN MURUGAN is not the stereotypical movie, but it borrows from all stereotypical movies that made Indian cinema so distinct from rest of the world. The best part is, QUICK GUN MURUGAN is innovative.

One sentence verdict? Try this dosa… it’s delicious!

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Quick Gun Murugun [Dr. Rajendra Prasad] is an unlikely superhero. He is a sincere South Indian cowboy who considers it his duty to serve and protect. The movie revolves around the misadventures of Quick Gun Murugun and his fight with his arch villain Rice Plate Reddy [Nasser].

Quick Gun Murugun enters into an epic battle that spans time and space, from a small South Indian village to Swarglok and then finally to the cosmopolitan Mumbai. He is torn between Mango Dolly [Rambha], who loves him and his first love Locket Girl [Anu Menon] and his loyalty is put to the test.

QUICK GUN MURUGAN depicts the war between good and evil and what makes it a novel experience is that the characters are straight out of 1970s. Director Shashanka Ghosh’s choice of the subject as also the execution deserves credit.

But there’s a hitch. There’s too much Tamil in the film, which though explained by sub-titles, may prove a deterrent in non-Tamil areas. In fact, the South Indian appeal would restrict its penetration into the nook and corner of the country.

Dr. Rajendra Prasad and Nasser vie for top honours. Both excel. Rambha suits the role. Anu Menon is good. Raju Sundaram does a fine job. Vinay Pathak has a brief role. Ditto for Ranvir Shorey, Gaurav Kapur and Sandhya Mridul. Ashwin Mushran is first-rate. Kishori Balla [Anni] is perfect.

On the whole, QUICK GUN MURUGAN is an innovative experience. The adventures should appeal to the youth mainly.

Two surprises…

  • One, KISAAN is the present-day interpretation of Manoj Kumar’s classic UPKAR. With changes, of course.
  • Two, going by the promos, the general feeling is that KISAAN is a shining example of regressive cinema. It isn’t!

With multiplexes spreading far and wide in the country, movies that ruled the roost in the 1970s – especially those depicting rural India – have disappeared from the face of Hindi movies. One of the prime reasons why UPKAR worked was because the conflict between two brothers was not so explored then, but post UPKAR, there have been dozens of movies that highlighted the conflict. Hence, KISAAN gives you the feeling of déjà vu at several points in the story.

Write your own movie review of Kisaan

But despite the similarities, KISAAN works in most parts because it’s engaging. The drama, even though predictable, is well handled and keeps you engrossed at several points.

Final word? Try out this desi stuff.

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Dayal Singh [Jackie Shroff], a widower, raises two very different sons; Aman [Arbaaz Khan] is formally schooled to become a city-based lawyer, while Jigar [Sohail Khan], through lack of funds and inclination towards anything other than farming, is kept by his father’s side.

When Sohan Seth [Dalip Tahil], a shrewd businessman, convinces many beleaguered farmers to sell their land for his commercial interests, it shatters the harmony of the village and Dayal’s family is jeopardized. Aman and Jigar are pitted against each other. The ground at their feet, is it motherland or simply property?

Surprisingly, KISAAN catches your attention from the word ‘Go’. The sequence at the panchayat [Sohail Khan's intro] only enhances your interest in the film, but the film actually takes off when Arbaaz starts drifting away.

At the same time, KISAAN has its share of loose ends. Times have changed and the writers could’ve updated the content to suit the current times. Also, Arbaaz’s change of heart towards the end looks like a complete compromise, from the writing point of view.

Puneet Sira has handled many a dramatic scene well. This is his finest work thus far. Daboo Malik’s music is of a mixed variety. A couple of tunes are nice – ‘Humko Kehna Hai’ and ‘Neechhe Saari Duniya Hain’. However, the visuals in the remix version of ‘Mere Desh Ki Dharti’ look out of sync. The makers should’ve maintained the desi look. Neelabh Kaul’s cinematography is nice. Action scenes [Mahendra Verma] are rustic, which gel well with the mood of the film.

Jackie is in form after a long, long time. Arbaaz doesn’t make much of an impact, but Sohail does. In fact, Sohail is only getting better with every film. Dia enacts her part well, while Nauheed is alright. Dalip Tahil is as usual. Sharat Saxena and Vishwajeet Pradhan don’t get much scope. Romeo is passable.

On the whole, KISAAN springs a pleasant surprise. At the box-office, the film is targeted at the Hindi belt and the single screens specifically. Also, this one deserves to be tax-exempted!

By Taran Adarsh, August 28, 2009 – 09:33 IST

Certain issues continue to make waves and hit headlines. Issues like the influx of people from the Northern states to Mumbai, or the one where, allegedly, residential societies don’t seem too keen to allot flats to members of a particular community…

N. Chandra encompasses all this and more in YEH MERA INDIA. The style of narrating the stories is akin to CRASH, while the storytelling is similar to Chandra’s accomplished works ANKUSH and PRATIGHAAT – two films that made him an iconic figure then.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

YEH MERA INDIA is sharp as a blade and yes, it does re-open old wounds. The film works in most parts because you identify with most stories, but how one wishes Chandra would’ve kept the length of the movie in check.

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Final word? YEH MERA INDIA has its heart in the right place. Here’s a film that pricks your conscience and makes you think. Recommended!

YEH MERA INDIA is an attempt to explore the real stories behind the headlines. These stories deal with racial bias, communal bias, caste bias, class bias, gender bias, lingual bias and immigrant bias that plague the society. It is a story of one day in the life of 12 people from different strata of Mumbai city, which is a melting pot of cultures.

N. Chandra goes back to his roots – topical, hard-hitting themes – and picks up stories that the common man would relate to. These stories are connected to one another and some of them are disturbing, which only goes to prove that the storyteller has succeeded in drawing your attention to the problems.

But what dilutes the impact is the way some of these stories are culminated in the concluding reels. In real life, not all stories have a happy end, but in this case, they do. Also, since Chandra has chosen to raise too many issues, it’s sure to take a toll on the length of the film, with each story demanding a justifiable ending and that only makes the goings-on lengthy.

Chandra is best remembered for his first two films [also TEZAAB] and in YEH MERA INDIA, the N. Chandra of yore is visible in several sequences. One only wishes the production values would’ve been superior.

The film has an ensemble cast and the actors infuse life in their characters. In fact, every actor in YEH MERA INDIA leaves a mark, but the ones who stand out are Anupam Kher, Parvin Dabas, Vijay Raaz, Atul Kulkarni, Seema Biswas, Rajpal Yadav and Smilie Suri.

On the whole, YEH MERA INDIA is a film that grows on you. It’s a film that the aam aadmi would connect with. At the box-office, this film should show an escalation thanks to a strong word of mouth.

By Taran Adarsh, August 28, 2009 – 11:30 IST

Not all English films can be adapted for the Indian screen. Also, the remake may not necessarily be as interesting as the original. That’s what you realize when you watch the Hindi version of DEATH AT A FUNERAL called DADDY COOL. Sadly, DADDY COOL is just not cool. Plenty of reasons why…

  • One, this supposedly laugh riot fails to tickle your funny bone, barring in a scene or two.
  • Two, the concept is more suited for a play. Setting an entire film on one location, with the story taking place in a span of a few hours, is not too exciting.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Even otherwise DADDY COOL tries so hard to make you laugh, but falls flat on its face. The unfortunate part is, comedy in Hindi movies is now relegated to making faces on camera and that’s what most actors in DADDY COOL do.

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Another factor that goes against the film is its humour. It’s crass and crude. In this film, men roam around either in shirts, showing off their underpants [Chunky Pandey] or stand on a roof with just underclothes [Aftab Shivdasani] or tell people to remove their underclothes so that they can relieve themselves in a toilet [Prem Chopra asks Jaaved Jaffery to do so].

Really, what kind of humour is this?

Chaos erupts during the funeral of Douglas [Sharat Saxena] when the grieved mourners are struck by drugs, romance, jealousy and a scandalous secret, all of which befall the family and friends.

Director K Murali Mohan Rao has helmed several interesting films in the past, but what’s this? Sure, DADDY COOL has a few entertaining moments, like the one when Rajpal Yadav reveals the secret [that Sharat Saxena was gay and Rajpal and he were lovers], but the remaining sub-plots fail to cut ice. Adding multiple sub-plots is fine as long as each sub-plot has something fascinating to say, but that’s missing here. Even the end is so bizarre, with members of this detached family suddenly professing love for one another.

There’s just one song [Raghav Sachar] at the start [a tuneful number] and one towards the end. Dialogues are strictly okay.

With a weak screenplay on hand, there’s not much the actors can do. The ones who try hard and manage are Suniel Shetty, Jaaved Jaffery, Sophie Choudry, Chunky Pandey and Prem Chopra.

On the whole, DADDY COOL fails to deliver what it promises – laughter and entertainment.

By Taran Adarsh, August 28, 2009 – 11:30 IST

Try stretching a rubber band beyond a point and it’s bound to snap. Try stretching a waferthin story and it’s bound to blow apart too. That’s precisely the problem with LOVE KHICHDI. Frankly, LOVE KHICHDI is a collage of romantic moments assembled by director Srinivas Bhashyam.

LOVE KHICHDI looks at the various women who flit in and out of the protagonist’s life. It’s a metro-centric concept that could’ve worked well if [a] the assorted women wouldn’t appear and disappear randomly and [b] the narrative had been limited to 1.30 hours, instead of 2 + hours.

These two factors make this khichdi far from appetising.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Vir [Randeep Hooda], a bachelor from a small town, works as a chef in a hotel in Mumbai; a handsome, charming and macho man who really needs to grow up.

Vir flirts with, yeans for, lusts after and is intimidated by one beautiful woman after another. From his man-hating maid Shanta Bai [Sonali Kulkarni], whom he ogles as she wipes his floor to the man-eating Nafisa [Kalpana Pandit], the powerful call-center executive… from the beauty-with-brains Sharmishta [Rituparna Sengupta] to the pretty and playful Parminder [Divya Dutta], Vir is drawn to them all.

All along, he is supported by his buddy, Sandhya [Sada], whom he takes for granted till it’s too late.

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LOVE KHICHDI mirrors the lifestyle of a section of youth today, who want to have all the fun, minus commitment. In this case, the film projects the flirtatious nature of a chef who believes in ‘no strings attached’ fun. The assorted women here add spice to his already spicy life. Very interesting!

But the escapades here are not as adventurous, as one expects them to be. Barring the portions involving the maid servant [Sonali Kulkarni] and also the adolescent neighbour [Riya Sen], the character sketches of the remaining women just doesn’t appeal.

To cite two instances, Rituparna Sengupta hides the fact that she’s a married woman till the very end, although she could’ve conveyed that much earlier. Also, Sada’s character seems so confused. Why doesn’t she reveal her true feelings beforehand? It would’ve saved so much time, frankly.

Director Srinivas Bhashyam had an interesting idea, but he loses the plot midway. Pritam’s music is humdrum. Dialogues are well penned at places.

Randeep sparkles all through, except towards the climax, when he breaks down. Amongst ladies, Sonal Kulkarni and Sada enact their parts very well. Riya Sen does bring a smile on your face. Saurabh Shukla is alright.

On the whole, this khichdi is just not yummy!


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