Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘deepali dhingra

HERE HE COMES: Emraan Hashmi

Director Milan Luthria was blown away by Emraan Hashmi’s tough look and performance in his forthcoming film

DEEPALI DHINGRA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 9, 2009)

No, Emraan Hashmi isn’t looking to flaunt his six-pack abs in this picture, but hey, can he help it if he is? This is a new and improved Emraan, with his look from Balaji Motion Pictures’
Once Upon A Time In Mumbai.

But it’s not just the look that the actor is excited about, it’s the film as well, where his role is that of a guy who challenges an underworld don. “The movie is set in the 60s when underworld was just trickling in Mumbai. My character Shoaib is one who challenges the authority of Sultan (Ajay Devgn). Shoaib is very ambitious, can do anything to get what he wants, he’s a fiery personality,” says Emraan. And though the mental preparation for a role like this required the actor to have regular interactions with his director Milan Luthria, it was his look that literally made him slog it out for three months.

Milan was clear about what he wanted from Emraan. “He told me I should look tough which extends beyond just having sixpack abs. It was about beefing up but keeping it lean too,” the actor says. Three months of training with a personal trainer and exercises that included strength endurance and… bingo! Even Milan was taken aback by Emraan’s dedication. “I was blown away!” admits Milan, “Emraan is quietly determined, as intensely passionate as a Hrithik or an Aamir when it comes to his work.” It was not just the looks, Milan was clear in his mind what he wanted from Emraan as an actor. “I was keen to have an actor who could match upto as well as be a foil to Ajay. Emraan has been tagged as a serial-kisser and as a sex symbol but with this film, I’m hoping to be the one who can push him to a different level,” he adds.

The shooting of the film will finish in January, which will be followed by promotions so that the film can release by May-June 2010. “The biggest element of surprise will be the looks and performances of each of the actors, be it Ajay or Kangna. As for Emraan, the audience will see a deeper dimension in his performance,” the director says.
deepali.dhingra@timesgroup.com

RARING TO GO! Madhavan
Madhavan about his link-up with Kangna Ranaut and more in a chat with Deepali Dhingra

Sitting in his plush apartment on the 27th floor of the residential complex he stays in, Madhavan is a picture of restlessness. He directs the photographer on how to capture his moods, takes us for a walk around his house where he shows us airplanes he’s designed and the visit includes even a trip to the garage, where he keeps his prized posession, his bike! The actor vrooms around, for the photographer’s benefit before settling down with an amused expression on being enquired about the buzz between him and Kangna Ranaut, his co-star from Tanu Weds Manu. “Is there a rumour?” he enquires, “Well, then what do I say? I lead a very boring life. Either that or I’m too smart!” he laughs, when we make the observation that one hasn’t heard of too many link-ups when it comes to him. So what’s the scene between him and Kangna actually? “She’s an amazing professional. On the sets, she, her sister, her dog and I were a gang. That’s about it!” he says firmly. Okay point noted. Madhavan would rather talk about his other films 3 Idiots and Teen Patti, where he gets to be in the esteemed company of Amitabh Bachchan and Sir Ben Kingsley. “In 3 Idiots, I’m back again with Aamir Khan and Sharman Joshi after Rang De Basanti, so there was added pressure of living upto the expectations of the audience,” he says. And no, he wasn’t apprehensive about playing a college student at this age. “We’re not horrible old men with pot-bellies and sagging skin!” he exclaims, “It was about getting the lingo and body language correct.” As for Teen Patti, he just can’t get over having Big B all to himself, even if is for a few scenes. “We played golf in between shots and I have to say, they were the greatest singular most important moments of my life,” he smiles.


Working with Sir Ben Kingsley on the other hand, Madhavan can only attribute to karma. “I’d not thought of acting till I saw him in Gandhi, so I guess there has to be something like karma for me to be acting alongside him,” he adds.

Maddy, as he’s fondly called, wants to do what he calls masti films now. “I’m tired of doing meaningful films!” the actor chuckles, “The kind of cinema I did, I was doing to satisfy my ego. Now I don’t want to play the nice guy anymore — I want to catch the bull by the horns!” And by that, he means doing light-hearted roles, including romance and comedy. “I want to do some roles now that are closer to me in real life. God has made some creations who are made to enjoy life, I’m one of them!” he smiles. And he couldn’t have said it better.
BOMBAY TIMES (December 8, 2009)
THIS IS ME: Sonal Sehgal

Sonal Sehgal would rather go with what her heart says

DEEPALI DHINGRA (BOMBAY TIMES; December 1, 2009)



When the going gets tough, the tough get going. And that’s exactly what Sonal Sehgal had to do, after waiting eons for her film Aashayein to release. The Nagesh Kukunoor film where she stars opposite John Abraham got delayed so much, that Sonal decided she could not wait any longer and signed her next film Radio. “It was six months after the music launch of Aashayein and I thought to myself that if I keep sitting at home, I’ll probably forget how to act!” she laughs. Of course, that doesn’t mean she isn’t disappointed about her first film being delayed so much. “It’s my first film, so it’s naturally very close to my heart. Plus it’s a beautiful story. When I asked Nagesh last when it would release, he said ‘soon’, so I’m waiting for that to happen soon,” she smiles. On the other hand, she’s a firm believer in destiny and believes that whatever has happened, has happened for the best. Says Sonal, “Since Aashayein got delayed, people don’t have any pre-conceived notions about me yet, and that’s why I was able to sign such diverse films as Radio and Jaane Kahan Se Aayi Hai.” Talk about Radio where she’s paired opposite Himesh Reshammiya and we can’t help but ask if she was advised against taking up the role by anyone. “If the director has such faith in Himesh, then who am I to judge?” she dodges the question diplomatically, and then laughs, “Anyway, I rarely listen to people’s advice. I want my success as well as failure to be credited to me alone,” she adds. But the actress is kicked about her role in the film. “It’s a contemporary look at relationships,” she says, adding that anyone who’s been in a relationship would identify with the film. “I play a girl who gets divorced from her husband but the habit of the relationship is hard to let go for her,” she explains her role. With so much work in her kitty, Sonal is glad that all the hard work and patience is finally paying off. “We make plans for our lives but God always has bigger, better plans for us,” she says with a smile.

Touchwood, we say!

 

WOMAN POWER: Tina Ambani

Tina Ambani is excited as the 11th Mumbai Film Festival kickstarts today amidst much fanfare

 

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE & DEEPALI DHINGRA
Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; October 29, 2009)

 

 

Reliance Big Entertainment, a part of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, is collaborating with MAMI to present the 11th Mumbai Film Festival that starts today. Here, Tina Ambani, who oversees the corporate social responsibility of the Reliance ADA Group, of which the film festival is a part of, talks about this year’s festival…
What prompted you to get the Reliance ADA Group to support the Mumbai Film Festival?
Cinema is an universal truth — the language of dreams. This language is spoken by all of us. Befittingly, Mumbai is called the city of dreams. The cradle of Indian cinema and home to the world’s largest film industry, it is a prolific manufacturer of dreams. More significant, it is a place where dreamers — filmmakers, actors, scriptwriters, composers — can turn their own visions of success into technicolour reality.
I know this only too well; my decade-long association with the industry has been both defining and empowering. Just as it is logical for this great city to have an international film festival that celebrates its spirit and rich cinematic heritage, it has been a natural step and an immense source of pride for me to support this festival and give it the stature it deserves.
Today, Reliance Big Entertainment, part of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, is a major player in Indian and international cinema. And our collaboration with the Mumbai Film Festival is a manifestation of our commitment to excellence and our gratitude to a fraternity of which we are proud.
How involved are you in the process?
As my professional roots are in this industry, I naturally have a tremendous engagement and involvement with the festival. Of course, this is a professionally run event with a wonderful team, so my involvement doesn’t need to extend to the day-today work. There is a trust of distinguished film professional managing it. Rather, my role is to work with this team to help the event grow and evolve.
What sets this film fest apart from the other fests in the country?
Any cinema-related event in Mumbai is bound to be special. Further, this is the first edition of Reliance Entertainment’s association with the Mumbai International Film Festival and we wanted to make the show more representative of India’s stature in world cinema than ever before. We have over 200 films from 56 countries that will be screened at three different venues. And there are several sidebar events where filmmakers and cineastes will get an opportunity to interact with each other.
What does the festival aim to achieve for the film industry and enthusiasts?
The film industry will have an international platform to showcase its talents, to stand up and be counted in the exciting wave of global cinema. And our filmmakers as well as film enthusiasts will get the opportunity to view new cinematic trends from across the world and broaden their own horizons. Film lovers will get a chance to interact with filmmakers, making the festival a truly interactive experience.
What is the biggest challenge in the fest according to you?
I would like the Indian film fraternity to come together and be a part of the Mumbai Film Festival. With our cinema being feted across the world, this is no time for us to be insular. The industry needs to not just participate wholeheartedly in such an event but assume a sense of ownership, a pride in Indian cinema, and come together to showcase it to the world.
Do you see the festival as being at par with international festivals across the world?
Of course! It will be an international experience and a landmark event. It will only evolve as we go along.
Personally, as an actor and film enthusiast, what are you looking forward to the most?
I am looking forward to the entire experience, the buzz that such an event will generate. As a former actor, it will be intriguing to see the new trends in cinema — the industry has evolved so much, both in terms of technical quality and professionalism. As for the bigger picture, I am eager to see the film fraternity, both Indian and international, and film lovers come together to celebrate their common passion. It’s show time!

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL: (From top) Stills from Luck By Chance, Kaminey, Love Aaj Kal

Heroines today are much more comfortable with their sexuality than ever before

DEEPALI DHINGRA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 29, 2009)


Did you cringe with discomfort when a seemingly innocent child woman Isha Sherwani seduced Farhan Akhtar into bed in Luck By Chance? Or, more recently, when a salwar kameez-clad Priyanka Chopra managed to convince a reluctant Shahid Kapoor to have sex with her in Kaminey, by telling him that she knows ‘homescience’ and that it’s ‘safe to do it’? More likely than not, you smiled at their boldness and prepared for more to come. Seduction was a game played by vamps in Bollywood in the 70s and 80s. Much later, lead actresses like Bipasha Basu and Priyanka Chopra were sexually charged in Jism and Aitraaz respectively. But even then, they were the ‘bad girls’. Well, times have changed — even the ‘good’ girls are taking a turn for the ‘bad’ and the audiences are lapping it up!


Watch newcomer Mahie Gill throwing herself in full abandon at Abhay Deol in a mustard field in Dev. D and you’ll know what we’re talking about. Trade analyst Komal Nahta says he isn’t surprised at this change. “Films, after all, are a reflection of today. Girls are proposing to guys, they are using seduction as a tool even in real life. The major composition of the audience comprises youth, so they have to show what the young generation identifies with,” he says. So Kareena Kapoor playfully hands Akshay Kumar her
bra in Tashan and Konkona SenSharma suggests a quick bout of love-making to Rahul Bose in Dil Kabaddi before they turn in for the night and Deepika Padukone has no qualms with Saif Ali Khan kissing her full on the mouth in the car in Love Aaj Kal. Agrees Mahie, “Reel life follows real life. Women today are more vocal about their sexual desires than what they were about a decade back. The audience today wants to see characters they can identify with. That’s why the boldness depicted by the newer lot of actresses has been accepted.”

According to film director Onir, a growing section of audiences in urban centres are accepting this change. “Independent working women watch these films with their male friends and colleagues who treat them as equals and therefore, accept their portrayal on screen as well,” he says. Also, the younger generation of filmmakers who have grown up seeing women as friends and colleagues, are showing female characters as they are, says Onir.
deepali.dhingra@timesgroup.com

Aamir Khan’s dead against the re-release of his film in multiplexes

DEEPALI DHINGRA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; May 31, 2009)

It’s known by now that Aamir Khan’s film Raakh is all set for a re-release as a part of a joint venture between two production houses on June 12. But for those fans of Aamir, who’re waiting to see their favourite star in the film that released two decades back, here’s some disappointing news. Apparently, the actor himself isn’t in favour of the film’s re-release. The reason is that Aamir is supporting the producers stand in the ongoing dispute between multiplex owners and producers and feels that the rerelease of Raakh will send the wrong message to everyone. Says Aamir, “Raakh is my second film and was released in 1990. Currently the person holding the rights is being opportunistic and is trying to make a quick buck by releasing the film during the strike. Also, the multiplexes might buy into the film in order to try and score a point over me and the unity of the producers. I therefore request my fans to stay away from all my films if they are released in any National Multiplex Chain during this period of struggle.

Anvita Thapliyal, speaking on behalf of the pro
duction house that’s re-releasing Raakh, says that by doing so, they want to revive Indian cinema. “It’s a great film that deserves another chance,” she says, adding that they have plans of reviving other films as well. As for which theatres they would release the film in case the strike doesn’t end, she says, “It’s not yet decided if we will release it in single screen theatres or multiplexes. We will do whatever is best for the film but the film has a lot of potential for single screen theatres, specially in the interiors, where they might not have multiplexes.” It should be noted that the other films that were re-released in the past two months including Ghajini, Race, Jodhaa Akbar, A Wednesday, Oye Lucky Lucky Oye, Rang De Basanti, Fashion, Golmaal Returns and Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi were screened only in single screen theatres.
NOT NOW: Aamir Khan and (above) in Raakh. For more pictures of the actor, visit http://photogallery.indiatimes.com


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.