Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘konkona sensharma

LAUGH SOME MORE: Ajay Devgn, Paresh Rawal and Konkona SenSharma in a still from the film
Three National Award winning artistes pool talent for a full-blown commercial comedy

MEENA IYER Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; November 17, 2009)

Remember Amita Pathak? She’s the girl who made her debut opposite Adhyanan Suman in Haal-e-Dil. Now Amita is back wearing the producer’s hat. The 20-something has just launched her banner Wide Frame Films. And, she is combining forces with Hollywood giant Warner Bros Pictures India to make her first production — Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge? — a subtle satire which when translated means, ‘Guest when will you leave?’

Amita says, “The story idea is mine. We had a guest at home for three months who over-stayed his hospitality. And it lead to so many funny and frustrating situations. When I narrated this to my director (Ashwini Dhir) and to my father (Kumar Mangat) they felt it made the perfect premise for a rip-roaring comedy. And that’s how Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge? was born.”
Amita even managed to get not one but three National Award winning artistes — Ajay Devgan, Konkona Sen Sharma and Paresh Rawal to greenlight her project almost immediately.

Says Ajay, the leading man, “I liked the script because it is very real… and has some slice-of-life comic situations. It is also very cleverly written and the humour in the dialogue makes it very likeable. I’m sure people from all walks of life will identify with this because every home must have had a guest who has been the bane of their lives.”

The music for this film is by the hot-shot composer Pritam and the film will release globally on February 26, 2010. “The script of Atithi… itself is a non-stop laugh riot and when you add the comical talents of Ajay, Paresh and Konkona, we have a winner at the box office,” says Denzil Dias, Deputy Managing Director (Theatrical) , Warner Bros. Pictures India.
meena.iyer@timesgroup.com

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL: (From top) Stills from Luck By Chance, Kaminey, Love Aaj Kal

Heroines today are much more comfortable with their sexuality than ever before

DEEPALI DHINGRA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 29, 2009)


Did you cringe with discomfort when a seemingly innocent child woman Isha Sherwani seduced Farhan Akhtar into bed in Luck By Chance? Or, more recently, when a salwar kameez-clad Priyanka Chopra managed to convince a reluctant Shahid Kapoor to have sex with her in Kaminey, by telling him that she knows ‘homescience’ and that it’s ‘safe to do it’? More likely than not, you smiled at their boldness and prepared for more to come. Seduction was a game played by vamps in Bollywood in the 70s and 80s. Much later, lead actresses like Bipasha Basu and Priyanka Chopra were sexually charged in Jism and Aitraaz respectively. But even then, they were the ‘bad girls’. Well, times have changed — even the ‘good’ girls are taking a turn for the ‘bad’ and the audiences are lapping it up!


Watch newcomer Mahie Gill throwing herself in full abandon at Abhay Deol in a mustard field in Dev. D and you’ll know what we’re talking about. Trade analyst Komal Nahta says he isn’t surprised at this change. “Films, after all, are a reflection of today. Girls are proposing to guys, they are using seduction as a tool even in real life. The major composition of the audience comprises youth, so they have to show what the young generation identifies with,” he says. So Kareena Kapoor playfully hands Akshay Kumar her
bra in Tashan and Konkona SenSharma suggests a quick bout of love-making to Rahul Bose in Dil Kabaddi before they turn in for the night and Deepika Padukone has no qualms with Saif Ali Khan kissing her full on the mouth in the car in Love Aaj Kal. Agrees Mahie, “Reel life follows real life. Women today are more vocal about their sexual desires than what they were about a decade back. The audience today wants to see characters they can identify with. That’s why the boldness depicted by the newer lot of actresses has been accepted.”

According to film director Onir, a growing section of audiences in urban centres are accepting this change. “Independent working women watch these films with their male friends and colleagues who treat them as equals and therefore, accept their portrayal on screen as well,” he says. Also, the younger generation of filmmakers who have grown up seeing women as friends and colleagues, are showing female characters as they are, says Onir.
deepali.dhingra@timesgroup.com



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