Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘sex

HOT! Neha Dhupia in a still from Raat Gayi Baat Gayi

One-night stands are harmless as long as you are not hurting anyone, says Neha Dhupia in a candid chat with BT

ROSHNI K OLIVERA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 30, 2009)

Neha Dhupia made headlines with her line ‘In India only SRK and Sex sell’. Now the focus is on her again with Pritish Nandy Communications’ Raat Gayi Baat Gayi releasing tomorrow. The movie, produced by Rangita Pritish Nandy and directed by Saurabh Shukla, won the best film award at the HBO Asian International Film Festival in New York last month. Neha plays the mysterious gorgeous woman hunted down by Rajat Kapoor, Vinay Pathak and Dalip Tahil, after a night of lots of drinking, sex and zero memory! Ask her if it’s a bold role and she replies candidly, “If you are asking in terms of skin show, then no. But if being bold is a state of mind, then yes.” That’s Neha for you. Not one to mince words, the actress speaks to BT about relationships, sex and movies…

What’s your take on one-night stands?
The problem with one-night stands is that you end up hurting so many people. As long as you are not hurting any one, it’s fine.

In Raat Gayi Baat Gayi you have a onenight stand with a married man…
There are seven characters in the film! Why do you assume it’s my character who’s had the one-night stand? Are you assuming that because I am attractive… Not fair!

Do you think the Indian audience is opening up to sex in movies?
Dev D was a big hit. Indian audiences are open to fantastic scripts. Raat Gayi… is a funny kind of a thrilling experience that takes you through a drunken night. You don’t really know what happened last night. The film is packed with a lot of emotions and it is very relatable. You can relate to one or the other character.

You’ve done movies of various genres… what’s your favourite?
It’s very hard for me to say that. Right from my roles in Singh Is Kinng, De Dana Dan, Mithya, Ek Chaalis Ki Last Local to Raat Gayi Baat Gayi, everything is challenging and at the same time everything is easy. I don’t over-intellectualise the whole acting medium. I’m not working because I have to work. I’m working because I really enjoy doing so.

Are you happy with the way your career has shaped up so far?
I am. I had made a few mistakes, but I don’t regret anything. They have been learning experiences. I have come a long way, but I also have a long way to go…

By IANS (Mid-Day; December 26, 2009)

Vishal Bhardwaj’s production venture “Ishqiya” faced the censor board’s ire for using the word ‘sex’ in its promos. But the ban has been lifted, giving respite to the producers.

The film has a scene where actor Arshad Warsi uses the three letter word, but it did not go down very well with the censor board.

Bhardwaj and his co-producers managed to convince the board members that the word was needed, and they finally gave their nod.

“It was initially decided that the word would be beeped and we gave an application for it to the revising committee, that comprises six-seven members. We had to convince them and make them understand that the word is essential for the film and the dialogue,” Mansi Maroo, co-producer of the film, said on phone from Mumbai.

With the censor board’s approval, the producers will re-launch the promos with the word audible.

“The dialogue lost its impact because of the ‘beep’ and now our whole plan has been delayed. In order to rectify things, we will have to re-do the scene and launch another promo with the word audible,” she said.

Asked if Bhardwaj too accompanied the other producers to the meeting with the censor board, Maroo added: “Vishal did not go for the meeting but he did have talks with the censor board people.”

Set in eastern Uttar Pradesh, “Ishqiya” is a tale of romance between individuals caught in a web of crime, suspense, passion and deceit. Directed by debutant Abhishek Chaubey, the film also stars Naseeruddin Shah and Vidya balan in pivotal roles.

Maroo also revealed that such procedures create hindrance in the film’s promotion.

“We have lost two-weeks of right promotion.”

“However, we are glad that finally we were heard and our job was done,” she added.

IANS tried to contact censor board chief Sharmila Tagore, but she was not available.

“Ishqiya” is slated to release Jan 29.

By TUSHAR JOSHI (Mid-Day; December 23, 2009)

Despite an ‘A’ certificate, the panel suggests major cuts in the film

Mahesh Nair, director of Celina Jaitly-Farooque Shaikh starrer Accident On Hill Road is a livid man. The Censor Board has objected to a one minute-50 second scene in his movie. The scene showing Celina and Abhimanyu Singh in bed making love has raised the eyebrows of the authorities making them chop some portions.

The film has been given an ‘A’ certificate, but Nair says the board isn’t playing fair. “In the recent past, there have been movies depicting violence and sex but that has gone unnoticed.”

Claiming that his love making scene is aesthetically shot he adds, “In fact, the portion they have raised objections to, doesn’t even have a liplock. Despite that they have problems with it.”

Describing the three issues the board has raised, Nair says, “Their first problem was that they objected to the lady removing her undergarments in the scene. However, Celina wears stockings that Abhimanyu removes before their lovemaking. I don’t think stockings are undergarments, and the board should understand that.

Secondly, they had an issue with too much caressing happening between the actors. They told me instead of touching each other why can’t they express their love by looking at each other, through their eyes! Lastly, they thought that one minute and 50 seconds was too long a time for the actors to establish a relation between the two. All these points are totally baseless and unwarranted.”

Furious that he has to go with the cut, Nair feels the board only picks on small budget films. “I don’t want to take names, but there have been so many films this year with enough liplocks and fight scenes depicting brutality which have made it without cuts, why give a different treatment to me?”

Vishal Bhardwaj is upset that the censor board will not pass a promo of Ishqiya unless he beeps out the word ‘sex’ from the dialogue

By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; December 17, 2009)


Vishal Bhardwaj is upset that the promo of his forthcoming film Ishqiya has not been passed by the censor board. The promo was to go on air from December 20. Only if Vishal agrees to beep the word ‘sex’ from a dialogue, will he be allowed to air it. The dialogue is spoken by Arshad Warsi and addressed to Naseeruddin Shah

Now Vishal has no option but to beep the apparently offensive word from the promo.

Ishqiya

Vinayak Azad, Regional Manager, Censor Board says, “We had initially passed the promo with an ‘A’ certificate for a theatrical release. Now they want a U/A certificate as they wanted it to air on television, which we allowed. Since the impact of the promos is higher on television because it is shown repeatedly, we asked for the word ‘sex’ to be beeped out. I believe they are not happy about it and want to approach the revising committee.”

Vishal Bhardwaj

The director, of course, doesn’t agree with the board’s views. Vishal Bhardwaj says, “It’s sad. Our society is regressing so much that we fear to even utter the word ‘sex’. And this is why India is the worst AIDS-affected country in the world. The people on the board who have objected to the word should remember they are in this world because of sex.”

Dibakar Banerjee gets voyeuristic in his next film

PRIYA SUGATHAN Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 17, 2009)

With the super success of Khosla Ka Ghosla and Oye Lucky, Lucky Oye, Dibakar Banerjee has come to be the new-age Hrishikesh Mukherjee and Basu Chaterjee rolled in one. While his third film Love Sex Aur Dhoka (LSD) continues to remain urban-centric and small-budget, it is going to be a radically different experience than its predecessors.

“The word ‘sex’ adds to the allure of the film. Why do we make so much out of this three-letter-word? When it’s accepted that it’s as basic a need as eating food, everyone indulges in it, and yet there’s a taboo to it. It also forms a major part of voyeurism, which is the premise of the film. We have turned voyeuristic in recent times. We want to know what’s happening behind closed doors, or catch a celeb with his pants down. It’s a streak that’s spilling over in our relationships, in our entertainment and the news. Even our ideas on love or sex are not our own, but borrowed from what’s seen on screen,” says Dibakar as he explains the subject of his film.

LSD will be India’s first digital film. “The Hindi filmgoer is going to be stunned. The film could only be shot on a digital format. In this age of online videos, Youtube, MMS, it’s time we explored these mediums to tell our stories. The format has its own grammar. I had to unlearn all my filmi gyan. It was my ground zero. I shot the film using cameras that were smaller than a lipstick, from inside a purse and also used infra red lights that are mostly used by soldiers in the night during war. It was necessary as the ‘camera’ plays the important character in my film,” explains the director.

Another first for Dibakar is his collaboration with Ekta Kapoor. “No one understands entertainment the way Ekta does. The one thing that I look for in my producers is how excited they get with the idea. Ekta understood that she was looking at a new way of filmmaking that would rewrite the rules in the Indian film industry. She not only liked the unique treatment of the film, but also its universal story of love, sex and betrayal,” reveals Dibakar, whose ‘peep show’ is set to release in early 2010 with complete newcomers in the cast. A 10-minute screener was shown to international delegates and film festival conveners at the Goa Film Bazaar and the response was exhilarating.

By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 11, 2009)


Acclaimed actor Om Puri is enormously upset with his wife, journalist-columnist Nandita for highlighting some of his most private sexual incidents to market her biography, Unlikely Hero: The Story Of Om Puri. A discernibly upset Om said, “I don’t care  if she’s my wife. I won’t let her get away with it.

I am in Chandigarh shooting for a film. On Monday I heard Nandita speaking about the biography she has written on me. I was shocked by her revelations. It was so cheap. She was talking about my sexual encounters as though those were my biggest achievements!”

Om’s main reason for being upset is Nandita’s revelation that he had sex with his maid Shanti at the age of 14. She has also exposed Om’s longstanding liaison with a woman named Laxmi with whom Om was sexually and emotionally involved.

Om is livid. “My wife has reduced a very important and sacred part of my life to cheap and lurid gossip. I had shared these dark secrets with my wife as all husbands do. If she chose to make them public at least she should’ve made sure to maintain a dignity about experiences that are a valuable part of my life. Has she forgotten that I have a standing in society and I’ve worked hard to achieve all that I have today? I won’t allow her to throw it all away for the sake of sensationalism.”

Om says that Laxmi was one of the most important women in his life. “This lady whom Nandita talks in such an undignified manner was Laxmi, who raised me and my brother’s orphaned children. My relationship with this wonderful woman was a homage to her loyalty for looking after me unconditionally.” Om doesn’t deny he had sex with Laxmi. “But it was not  a furtive and sleazy experience. It was beautiful. Why make such a tamasha out of these very sensitive moments? Mahatma Gandhi spoke of his experiences with sexuality in The Story of My  Experiments With Truth. But was that all there was to his life? Why highlight these aspects when there’s so much more to me? Do you know, when I was a child, I was travelling by train with my destitute mother. The entire compartment collected money to feed us. That incident remains etched in my mind. I was working in a teashop when I was seven years old. When I came to  the FTII, Pune I didn’t have a decent shirt to wear. I had to borrow one  from Naseeruddin Shah. I had hoped when my life was chronicled it would be an inspirational story.”

Om says his wife insisted on  writing his biography. “I was aware that another lady (Aparajita Krishna) was writing my biography. When Nandita expressed  a desire to write about me I couldn’t stop her because she’s my wife but she has forgotten who she is,” added Om.

The actor complains that Nandita didn’t allow him to read the  manuscript. “Not once did she let me read even one page of the manuscript. How was I to know how she would use the incidents from my life to sell her book?”

When we promised to be discreet in putting forward his anguish and humiliation, Om retorted, “Please don’t be discreet. Has she exercised any discretion in talking about my personal experiences? The final decision to put my life up as a tamasha was Nandita’s. I can’t forgive her.”

Om and Nandita Puri

When we asked Nandita for her side of the story, she said, “This is all such a mistake. My book on  my husband is a biography, not  bl***y pornography. The book is about Om, the man and the actor. Om has all the human foibles, just like all of us. He had sex as an adolescent with his maid and then he had a long liaison with the other lady who was also a maid. This was his way of coming out of his other relationships and demolishing class differences. If Om has any objection to her being called a maid he’s just being unrealistic.”

So are his sexual experiences an integral part of the book? “They are,” admitted Nandita. “But that’s not all.” Apparently, the broadcast journalist who interviewed Nandita picked up excerpts from a weekly news magazine. “She called me on her show and for 20 minutes she spoke only about Om’s sexual escapades. When I thought she’d  question me about other aspects of Om’s life in the book, the show was over. I was horrified. I was even more  horrified when I saw the show,” added Nandita.

Yesterday morning, Nandita received a very angry call from Om who is in Chandigarh .“He was livid. The double escapades with the two maid servants has made Om feel he’ll be compared to Shiney Ahuja. Now my husband is angry, my publishers are upset and so  am I,” said Nandita.

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL: (From top) Stills from Luck By Chance, Kaminey, Love Aaj Kal

Heroines today are much more comfortable with their sexuality than ever before

DEEPALI DHINGRA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 29, 2009)


Did you cringe with discomfort when a seemingly innocent child woman Isha Sherwani seduced Farhan Akhtar into bed in Luck By Chance? Or, more recently, when a salwar kameez-clad Priyanka Chopra managed to convince a reluctant Shahid Kapoor to have sex with her in Kaminey, by telling him that she knows ‘homescience’ and that it’s ‘safe to do it’? More likely than not, you smiled at their boldness and prepared for more to come. Seduction was a game played by vamps in Bollywood in the 70s and 80s. Much later, lead actresses like Bipasha Basu and Priyanka Chopra were sexually charged in Jism and Aitraaz respectively. But even then, they were the ‘bad girls’. Well, times have changed — even the ‘good’ girls are taking a turn for the ‘bad’ and the audiences are lapping it up!


Watch newcomer Mahie Gill throwing herself in full abandon at Abhay Deol in a mustard field in Dev. D and you’ll know what we’re talking about. Trade analyst Komal Nahta says he isn’t surprised at this change. “Films, after all, are a reflection of today. Girls are proposing to guys, they are using seduction as a tool even in real life. The major composition of the audience comprises youth, so they have to show what the young generation identifies with,” he says. So Kareena Kapoor playfully hands Akshay Kumar her
bra in Tashan and Konkona SenSharma suggests a quick bout of love-making to Rahul Bose in Dil Kabaddi before they turn in for the night and Deepika Padukone has no qualms with Saif Ali Khan kissing her full on the mouth in the car in Love Aaj Kal. Agrees Mahie, “Reel life follows real life. Women today are more vocal about their sexual desires than what they were about a decade back. The audience today wants to see characters they can identify with. That’s why the boldness depicted by the newer lot of actresses has been accepted.”

According to film director Onir, a growing section of audiences in urban centres are accepting this change. “Independent working women watch these films with their male friends and colleagues who treat them as equals and therefore, accept their portrayal on screen as well,” he says. Also, the younger generation of filmmakers who have grown up seeing women as friends and colleagues, are showing female characters as they are, says Onir.
deepali.dhingra@timesgroup.com


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