Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘1968

Anurag Kashyap finds an unusual hero to play a serial killer for the second film of the Mumbai trilogy – Nawazuddin aka Patna Presley of Emosonal Attyachaar

By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; January 05, 2010)


Anurag Kashyap’s much talked-about Mumbai trilogy has found its third and final hero. While Aamir Khan stars in the first film, John Abraham will play the lead in the third. Now, the little-known but talented Nawazuddin who gave sterling cameo performances in 2009 in Nandita Das’s Firaaq, Kabir Khan’s New York, Anurag Kashyap’s Dev D (one of the two Patna Presleys singing Emosonal Attyachaar) and Black Friday, has been pencilled in as the lead in Kashyap’s second film in the Mumbai trilogy. It’s a huge leap for an actor from a village near Delhi.

More startling than his casting is the character that Nawazuddin plays. He plays Raman Raghav, India’s most brutal serial killer. In 1968, Raghav bludgeoned a number of pavement dwellers to death before he was caught and diagnosed with schizophrenia. (Sriram Raghavan has, in fact, made a documentary on the serial killer.)

Nawazuddin has been secretly reading up on Raman Raghav and looking at footage of the killer. When we spoke to him, Nawazuddin was taken aback. He said, “Anurag has asked me to keep it absolutely quiet. Yes, I’m playing the serial killer Raman Raghav in Anurag Kashyap’s film. It’s the biggest challenge of my career especially since superstars like Aamir and John feature in the other two films of the series.”

Nawazuddin, who has been trying to make a mark as an actor in Bollywood since 1996, has played the lead in Aamir Khan’s Peepli Live and Mangesh’s Dekh Circus too. Says the actor emotionally, “I’ve waited very long for this. I’ve struggled hard to get out of playing the cameo to the lead. Mumbai trilogy is my greatest challenge.”

Anurag Kashyap Nawazuddin

WILL THEY, WON’T THEY? Ranbir Kapoor and Kareena Kapoor

Bollywood’s Kapoor dilemma

MEENA IYER Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 21, 2009)

The Kapoors, the first family of Bollywood, have been known for some truly incestuous screen combinations. Shashi Kapoor has romanced both his brother Raj’s daughters-in-law — Babita Shivdasani-Kapoor in Haseena Man Jayegi in 1968 and Neetu Singh-Kapoor in Deewar in 1975, and Randhir Kapoor has also romanced his sister-in-law (bhabhi) Neetu Singh in a couple of movies like Rickshawalla in 1973 and Kasme Vaade and Heeralal Pannalal in 1978. By sheer virtue of the fact that all the Kapoor family members have ruled the roost at some time or the other, filmmakers couldn’t help but cast them in the romantic lead opposite each other.

The same dilemma has come back to haunt two major filmmakers now. Rumours have it that Sajid Nadiadwala, who is making his next film Anjaana Anjaani with Bollywood’s current heartthrob Ranbir and Priyanka Chopra, was heard telling an insider from the Kareena Kapoor camp that he would have ideally liked to work with Bebo and Ranbir. But, of course, since they are first cousins the pair would get audience rejection.

It is also reported that the Mehtas of Ashtavinayak will go on the floors with their film directed by Imtiaz Ali with Ranbir on April 1, 2010. Once again, this banner that loves Bebo because she is their Jab We Met heroine, wanted her in the lead. However, since they have had to choose between Ranbir and Kareena — both of whom are the current hot favourites — they have chosen to cast Ranbir.

But Bebo is not entirely at a disadvantage. There is a third film corporation that wants to cast her with the light-eyed youngster Imran Khan, who is another Bollywood hottie.
Sharmila Tagore has just done her first Marathi film Samantar, opposite Amol Palekar. She talks about her occasional foray into acting and lists her most memorable roles
By Indu Mirani (MUMBAI MIRROR; September 01, 2009)
What tempts you to do a film?

When I got married way back in 1968, my decision was to cut down on films but never give up. The very act of getting married means that you are not alone, you are taking on a family. In those days it could take two-three years to make a film. Now, we work on one film at a time, which is the ideal way to work. That’s how regional films are made.

I am turned on by a good script and a good role and I don’t judge a good role by its length. When you start doing character roles, it gives you a liberating feeling because you are no longer victim to looking good and you can then freely be the character.

I would love to do those characters with today’s directors like Vishal Bharadwaj or Raju Hirani. Imtiaz Ali obviously makes films about two young people in love but if he ever has a role for elderly people I would love to do it.Samantar offered all this?

In Samantar, although my character, Shama, is a recluse, she doesn’t go by social compulsions but by natural compulsions which is about being herself. Being herself means gardening, being close to nature, she creates beautiful pottery, she plays the violin. But in the company of people she isn’t herself. I chose this role because it is not a very verbose character so there is minimal dialogue except that I do have a three-page soliloquy.

Amol is a very sensitive director, and there is beautiful camera work, beautiful locations, and very competent and talented actors who play the smaller supporting characters. We shot at this place called Kalna which even the Bengali directors haven’t discovered. It’s a place of archeological importance. It’s a terracotta Shiv temple dating back 300 years, it has 108 Shivlings white and black.

The music by Anand Modak is excellent, Shomit’s lyrics are excellent.

Sharmila in Samantar

Why did it take you so long to take on a Marathi film?

Because nobody asked me so far. Amol was the first one who came with a Marathi proposal. I have been seeing Shashikalaji’s performances, Dr Mohan Agashe is a dear friend and I have always had the highest regard for Marathi actors because like in Bengal, they are all very good actors. If we can see Iranian films and Chinese films, why can’t we see our own regional films?

Doesn’t every language have its own meter and isn’t it difficult to adjust?

Bengali and Marathi have the same meter. Pauses, breaks and emphasis are the same. It’s just that some alphabets are pronounced differently.

So, is your character alone or lonely?

She chooses to be alone, but is not lonely. Like I said, she does not follow social compulsions. She is alright with herself, true to her own being and to her nature.

When you are alone, not enjoying yourself, are resentful and wanting company and when you don’t get company you feel deprived, that is being lonely. I would take loneliness in a negative sense. Somewhere in our souls we are all alone. To be alone I think is wonderful, that is when you can introspect, grow or evolve and that is a very positive thing. To be alone and doing your own thing, listening to music, exercising, looking at a beautiful flower, swimming in the sea or walking alone in the hills, it’s a wonderful healing process. When you are doing yoga you aren’t doing it to impress anybody, you are doing it for yourself. That is a healing and growing process. That is the difference between loneliness and being alone.

Which three Hindi films would you list as most memorable?

I would say Safar with Asit Sen, Dooriyan with Bhimsain and Mausam. Safar and Dooriyan were the two films where I follow an individual goal as a woman. Usually all women put the family before and sacrifice for them. These two women want to follow their careers and are therefore misunderstood. Indian films should have professional women because the moment you become a working woman, you are  a negative character, you are the cause of divorce. Children should feel, ‘I have a working mother’ and look at it with added value as opposed to that she is working woman, she must be neglecting her children.

The change is happening…

It needs to change more. Look at the disparity between the hero’s salary and the heroine’s.

What did you think of Saif in the Kal part of Love Aaj Kal?

It’s written very well, and Saif is very good, specially in the Kal part. Whatever he does, pulls his shirt in front, the earnestness, he does it very well. He is one of those very spontaneous actors. When he interacts with others, the screen looks good, not that he outsmarts the others. He doesn’t interact with his audience, he interacts with his co-stars. Therefore his scenes are very real and I think he is becoming a wonderful actor.

You are set to have a celebrity daughter-in-law soon ( Kareena Kapoor). How will it affect family dynamics?

I don’t think it changes anything. She also comes from a film background and we come from various fields. One extra person comes in and things change, but it’s for the better. You have to grow, everything grows.