Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘aakansha naval-shetye

 

WOMAN POWER: Tina Ambani

Tina Ambani is excited as the 11th Mumbai Film Festival kickstarts today amidst much fanfare

 

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE & DEEPALI DHINGRA
Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; October 29, 2009)

 

 

Reliance Big Entertainment, a part of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, is collaborating with MAMI to present the 11th Mumbai Film Festival that starts today. Here, Tina Ambani, who oversees the corporate social responsibility of the Reliance ADA Group, of which the film festival is a part of, talks about this year’s festival…
What prompted you to get the Reliance ADA Group to support the Mumbai Film Festival?
Cinema is an universal truth — the language of dreams. This language is spoken by all of us. Befittingly, Mumbai is called the city of dreams. The cradle of Indian cinema and home to the world’s largest film industry, it is a prolific manufacturer of dreams. More significant, it is a place where dreamers — filmmakers, actors, scriptwriters, composers — can turn their own visions of success into technicolour reality.
I know this only too well; my decade-long association with the industry has been both defining and empowering. Just as it is logical for this great city to have an international film festival that celebrates its spirit and rich cinematic heritage, it has been a natural step and an immense source of pride for me to support this festival and give it the stature it deserves.
Today, Reliance Big Entertainment, part of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, is a major player in Indian and international cinema. And our collaboration with the Mumbai Film Festival is a manifestation of our commitment to excellence and our gratitude to a fraternity of which we are proud.
How involved are you in the process?
As my professional roots are in this industry, I naturally have a tremendous engagement and involvement with the festival. Of course, this is a professionally run event with a wonderful team, so my involvement doesn’t need to extend to the day-today work. There is a trust of distinguished film professional managing it. Rather, my role is to work with this team to help the event grow and evolve.
What sets this film fest apart from the other fests in the country?
Any cinema-related event in Mumbai is bound to be special. Further, this is the first edition of Reliance Entertainment’s association with the Mumbai International Film Festival and we wanted to make the show more representative of India’s stature in world cinema than ever before. We have over 200 films from 56 countries that will be screened at three different venues. And there are several sidebar events where filmmakers and cineastes will get an opportunity to interact with each other.
What does the festival aim to achieve for the film industry and enthusiasts?
The film industry will have an international platform to showcase its talents, to stand up and be counted in the exciting wave of global cinema. And our filmmakers as well as film enthusiasts will get the opportunity to view new cinematic trends from across the world and broaden their own horizons. Film lovers will get a chance to interact with filmmakers, making the festival a truly interactive experience.
What is the biggest challenge in the fest according to you?
I would like the Indian film fraternity to come together and be a part of the Mumbai Film Festival. With our cinema being feted across the world, this is no time for us to be insular. The industry needs to not just participate wholeheartedly in such an event but assume a sense of ownership, a pride in Indian cinema, and come together to showcase it to the world.
Do you see the festival as being at par with international festivals across the world?
Of course! It will be an international experience and a landmark event. It will only evolve as we go along.
Personally, as an actor and film enthusiast, what are you looking forward to the most?
I am looking forward to the entire experience, the buzz that such an event will generate. As a former actor, it will be intriguing to see the new trends in cinema — the industry has evolved so much, both in terms of technical quality and professionalism. As for the bigger picture, I am eager to see the film fraternity, both Indian and international, and film lovers come together to celebrate their common passion. It’s show time!
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TV’S SIZZLING AND HOW: Rani Mukerji, Amrita Rao, Eesha Koppikhar, Genelia D’Souza andPreity Zinta. 

Yes, for several actresses now… who enjoy the mass reach and moolah!

 

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; October 28, 2009)

 

Bollywood may be big, but Tellywood’s small screen is proving to be a bigger lure for our B-town actors and actresses. After a string of Bollymen — right from Amitabh Bachchan to Shah Rukh Khan and Salman Khan — gave in to the temptation and showed their dum on television, it’s now the turn of the actresses to hog the telly-limelights. Years back, Karisma Kapur, Madhuri Dixit, Raveena Tandon and Manisha Koirala set the trend because they were not exactly hot property at the BO. Now the new brigade is jumping on the TV bandwagon also because of the draw of the mass reach and the moolah. So, while Rani Mukerji is judging a reality dance show Dance Premiere League, Amrita Rao is a celebrity panelist on a reality matchmaking show The Perfect Bride. Not too long ago, Kajol alongwith mum Tanuja and hubby Ajay Devgn had turned judge for a family show Rock N Roll Family, as had Sonali Bendre for Indian Idol, while Soha Ali Khan is hosting a game show Khelo, Jeeto, Jeeyo. Urmila Matondkar, too, had created quite a stir with Jhalak Dikhla Jaa and Waar Parivaar, while Shilpa Shetty wowed viewers with Bigg Boss. Eesha Koppikhar’s wrestling with her reality show 100 Percent De Dhana Dhan and now Genelia too is set to join the fray soon with Big Switch. Even Preity Zinta is reportedly in talks with a TV channel to host a game-show.
Having started her career in the glam world with ads on TV, for Amrita, the small screen has always held a special place. “I have never underestimated the power and the reach of television. In fact, the entire industry depends on it for promoting their films. Besides I believe that there can never be boundaries for talent. Look how the stars have been balancing it abroad. Why can’t we have equal respectability for both mediums here too,” questions the actress, who was drawn to do a reality show because of the unique concept that the show offered.
Genelia is equally excited with her foray on TV and says, “I am really very excited about this, it’s going to be a lot of fun.”
And channel heads are certainly happy to get a dash of Bollywood glam to sizzle up their TRPs. Says Danish Khan, VP Marketing, of a popular channel, “It’s a win-win situation for the actor and the channel. The actor gets to connect with the masses while the channel benefits since the actors bring with them their loyal fans.”
Even as industry watchers continue to debate on the real reason behind the stars’ descent on the small screen — with most industry watchers claiming that it’s all about reaching out to the masses, and some insisting that it’s purely a case of making hay while the sun shines — the stars continue to rain on TV. Viewers are certainly not complaining about getting an extra dose of their beauty queens right in their living
rooms.
LADY IN BLACK: Sushmita Sen. For more pictures of the diva, visit http://photogallery.indiatimes.com
…says Sushmita Sen who returns to Bollywood after two years looking like a diva again

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 16, 2009)

It’s been two long years since we last saw Bollywood diva Sushmita Sen sizzle on screen. This of course, barring the passable international film Karma, Confessions and Holi, which the former beauty queen vehemently denied being associated with. “Yes, it’s been long since I have seen me on screen too,” she jokes. Having shed the extra weight she’d had to gain for a movie role, the leggy beauty’s looking her usual svelte self. “Sexy, sensuous, gorgeous, it’s all about what’s up here,” she says, pointing towards her head. But now she’s ready to put her sexiest foot forward, as she readies to make up for her long absence with two back-to-back films coming up and a string of flicks lined up next year as well.

Kickstarting with Do Knot Disturb, followed by Dulha Mil Gaya and later No Problem, Sush also seems to have finally found her forte — comedy. But point this out and she is quick to clarify, “I don’t want to be bound down by genres. But yes, I am really tired of consolation prizes and do want to sign up more commercial films. I am done with the experimenting phase,” she says, reflecting on her choice of films post Main Hoon Na.

And though she doesn’t regret her choices, she does admit that several have left a bitter taste. “I gave up a lot of roles to do films that I thought would bring out the actress rather than the heroine in me,” she says candidly. “But today is different. Now I want to go in for the kill, at least that’s the idea,” she asserts the fighting spirit in her. Keen to repeat the success, she tasted with her early attempts at comedy, now she is looking forward to silencing her detractors once again.

Looking back at the past two years, Sush was kept busy by the constant speculation revolving around her personal life and professional. But she always maintained a dignified silence, whether it was talks about her weight gain — which she had incidentally gained to play the role of
a hatti katti wife opposite Govinda in Do Knot… — or about her onand-off relationship with filmmaker Mudassar or even her ambitious project Rani Laxmi Bai and more recently reports of tension between her and good friend Shah Rukh Khan. “I am very vocal, but not reactive. I don’t believe in feeding rubbish stories. Sometimes being the silent puppy is the ultimate diva act,” she says, dismissing the apparent fight with SRK as a rumour.

However, talk about her pet project Rani Laxmi Bai and she reveals that she’s happy at the moment to watch the historical character being revived on television. “The project is on hold and will remain so till I don’t get to make it my way.” And about her film based on the life of late Benazir Bhutto? “Well that has to be cleared by the Pakistan People’s Party (PPP). It’s a very controversial film so the moment we get a clearance, the project will be on,” she confirms.

Till then she’s happy with the films on her platter and a “gorgeous daughter” to keep her busy back home. “Oh, she’s a very sharp girl. In fact, I learn a lot from her each day,” says the proud mamma. But between the momdaughter duo does the father talk ever crop up. “Renee would surely like to have a father, but she doesn’t miss one yet. Often I tease her about getting her married off, and she’s quick to retort, ‘Not before you get married first,’ so yes, that’ll happen sometime too. We will definitely get a dad for Renee.” But who and when? “Well, that’s not something I am revealing yet,” she smiles.

Kites2

IT’S ALL IN THE NAME: Poster of Kites

Bollywood has given up HAHK and DDLJ for short and simple English titles

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 15, 2009)

Bollywood has rediscovered the KISS (Keep It Short and Simple) rule, at least where film titles are concerned. Having had its fill of long names — Bollywood’s now high on short words, and most of them straight off the English vocabulary rack. Sample this: almost 20 films this year had English titles and there are almost 30 more to come… from Blue to Wanted and Radio to Kites. Trade pundits attribute this to several reasons. “Almost every title has been exhausted. Others have been blocked by producers before hand. Filmmakers have to come up with unique titles and English words give an instant youth connect,” explains trade analyst Komal Nahta, adding, “Even Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge was shortened to the English DDLJ.”

Trade analyst Taran Adarsh agrees, claiming that it’s a healthy trend looking at global cinema, “Bollywood films have an international audience. Ever since English lyrics in Hindi songs became a hit, filmmakers began exploring these options. As long as the title suits the content of the film, it’s bound to work.” Vashu Bhagnani, whose next film is titled Do Knot Disturb, adds, “When the masses can accept English songs and words in our films, why not
titles? The audience targeted is largely the youth and they can easily identify with such names.” Rohit Shetty, director of All the Best and Golmaal Returns, defended his titles, “Words like Welcome, All The Best, Luck, and No Problem work well even with the non-English speaking masses in the interiors. These titles have tested positive with the multiplex audience so it’s a win-win scenario all across.”

Trade analysts also believe TV has made English and ‘Hinglish’ popular. “Thanks to the serials, talk shows and advertisements, ‘Hinglish’ has become well-accepted. So if the words are simple and part of daily usage, the names are more likely to work than not,” say trade analysts.

However, filmmaker Vipul Shah, whose films — Singh is Kinng, London Dreams and Action Replayy — all have English names, has a different take. “London Dreams is the name of a band associated with my film, whereas Action Replayy was the name of my play done several years ago. So, the name has to show some connection with the film theme and should not be a random word,” he says. Will the trend of long names that kickstarted with Hum Aapke Hain Kaun pave way for English shorties? Time will tell.

My Name is KhanENGLISH SHORTIES RELEASED THIS YEAR
Fox, Luck, Three, Life Partner, Daddy Cool, Sankat City, Shortkut: The Con is On, Quick Gun Murugan, Bachelor Party, Bad Luck Govind, Chandni Chowk To China, Luck By Chance, Victory, The Stoneman Murders, 13B, Straight, Team, Runway, Let’s Dance, Morning Walk, Perfect Mismatch, Shadow, Toss

ENGLISH SHORTIES TO COME
Blue, Wanted, All the Best, London Dreams, Acid Factory, What’s Your Raashee?, 3 Idiots, Eight, Fast Forward, Shoebite, My Name Is Khan, Jail, Do Knot Disturb, Paa, Radio, Season Greetings, Chase, Kites, Wake Up Sid, Prince, Rocket Singh: Salesman of The Year, No Problem, Road Movie, Accident on Hill Road, Action Replayy
GETTING REAL: Ashuu Trikha
..says director Ashuu Trikha in a candid chat with BT

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE (BOMBAY TIMES; September 8, 2009)


Ashu Trikha believes in following his dreams, even if that means waiting for three years to realise them. Not the one to follow a beaten path, the director, who’s also directed Alag, is back with another hatke film, this time based on the crime scene in Central India. Titled Baabarr, the film marks the debut of newcomer Soham along with actress Urvashi Sharma and also stars stalwarts like Mithun Chakraborthy, Om Puri, Tinnu Anand and Sushant Singh. Here, the filmmaker talks about his crime caper.

Baabarr is based on real-life incidents. What made you choose such a hard-hitting subject?
• The entire fact that such incidents have happened and continue to happen even today, and that the characters depicted in the film really do exist, is a matter of great shame for any society. It was something that I felt about very strongly.

You tried to deal with the film in realistic manner…
• Yes, because the film required it. Baabarr is a stark film, not for the fainthearted. A lot of research has gone into it. And during that, we realised that to get the right feel, it was important to keep the backdrop as natural as possible. So whether it’s shooting on rough terrain or in real locations or with real country made revolvers, we have tried to present reality in the truest form.
Your last few films have all been very different. Weren’t you wary of taking a risk with such a serious film on crime?
• Every film is a risk. The only thing in our hands is to make a film sincerely and with all honesty.
On the one hand you have a newcomer Soham and on the other hand you have stalwarts like Om Puri and Mithun Chakraborthy…
• Yes. And I felt like I’m having the best of both the worlds. There was raw talent waiting to be honed and there was a sea of experience waiting to be tapped. Omji and Mithunda are some of the finest actors to date, while Soham has the spark and is spectacularly good as a debutante.

Do you think a film so real is commercially viable?
• Absolutely. The film is not a documentary. It has its light moments, there are songs and dances too, but none of them have been forcibly included. So, it’s very much a hard-core commercial film, but with it’s sensibilities rooted in realism.

What was the most challenging thing about shooting for the film?
• Shooting in the kind of conditions that we did was challenging. Because unlike shooting in a studio which is quite a controlled environment, shooting in rough terrain is physically very demanding.

What’s the message you want your audiences to take home after watching the film?
• I don’t want to preach anything through my film. I only want them to question where we are headed as a society.

(Contributed by AKNS and Harshada Rege)

MULTIPLE FACES: Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra set to enter book of world records for playing 12 roles in her next film

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; September 2, 2009)

Hard work does pay. Ask Priyanka Chopra, who is all set to enter the
Guinness Book of World Records for playing the highest number of characters in one film. A feat that the actress has accomplished with her 12 avatars in Ashutosh Gowariker’s forthcoming film What’s Your Raashee?

The producer has sent the actresses’ name to be officially entered in the Guinness. “If this does happen, it will be phenomenal,” said Priyanka excitedly. “I’m overjoyed and honoured to be a part of this record-breaking film.”

Producer Sunita Gowariker, who’s equally elated, revealed, “Priyanka has not only played 12 different roles, but breathed life into 12 distinct characters without the aide of any
prosthetics. Few people realise how difficult a challenge it is. This we gauged when we spoke to the Guinness officials. No actor has ever played so many different roles in cinema of any language. So it truly is a world record.”
The versatile Kamal Hassan played 10 roles in Dashavataram. He beat Sanjeev Kumar and Sivaji Ganeshan by one role as the two had done nine roles for Naya Din Nayi Raat and Navarathiri respectively. Internationally, too, not many actors have come close to achieving this. Eddie Murphy played seven characters in The Nutty Professor, and he only upped it to eight in the sequel. Eric Idle is credited with having played seven in Monty Python and The Holy Grail (1975), while Alec Guinness played eight in Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949).

A NEW AVATAR: Kangna Ranaut. For more pictures of the actress, visit http://photogallery.indiatimes.com
…says Kangna Ranaut, who’s said goodbye to intense roles and is up for comedy

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; August 10, 2009)


Goodbye Adhyayan Suman, farewell intense, brooding roles… Kangna Ranaut is presenting herself in a new avatar to Bollywood — that of the romantic comediene. She’s shooting her very first comedy — No Problem with Akshaye Khanna — and will take up another, Tannu Weds Mannu with R Madhavan, immediately after that. This image change couldn’t have come at a better time.


“Yes, I am seeing a lot of changes recently, more positive than negative thankfully,” she said of her personal and professional life. Excited about doing comedy, Kangna said, “It’s taken so long for me to do what most conventional actresses start out doing — romance or romantic comedies. But better late than never. I was tired of being depressed, now it’s time to have some fun,” she said.


Admitting she’s not too funny a person in real life, despite having a humorous side, the sexy
star said, “I am glad I did the intense kind of roles early on in my career. But now I am happy with the kind of films coming my way.” And that includes Once Upon A Time In Mumbai and the Hrithik Roshan-Barbara Mori-starrer Kites, amongst others. Does she feel left out considering the film is being promoted solely with these two stars? “I have done my job, the rest is the filmmakers’ call, they can market it in whatever way they want to,” she replied, adding, “at the end of the day, it’s only good performances that’ll stand out.”


Her break-up has not really left Kangna heartbroken and hurt, or the actress is not showing any signs of it. “It’ll take a lot more than these ups and downs in life to break me,” she said. “And it’s really not as if I am working to get over anything. Work’s keeping me busy for work’s sake, but yes, it’s keeping me distracted from pondering too much about the past. I know that love hurts sometimes, but I can never stop being in love.”