Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘die

By Subhash K. Jha, December 31, 2009 – 11:35 IST

Abbas Tyrewala Abbas Tyrewala who directed one of 2008’s biggest successes is also a writer of great repute, having written among other things, the prophetic dialogues of Munnabhai MBBS and the screenplay of Maqbool.

Abbas went to see the latest Yashraj production Rocket Singh Salesman Of The Year not only as a writer and director but also as an eager fan of the films that the banner comes out of.

“I love Jaideep Sahni’s writing and Shimit Amin’s direction. But what were they thinking while doing Rocket Singh? Where is the payoff in the screenplay? Where is the hero? Ranbir plays a timid Sardar who steals phone lines and computer hardware from his work-place to start his own business. And we are supposed to accept him as a man of integrity! Would he be able to start his own business if it wasn’t for the nefarious support he gets from his work-place? In other words the ‘hero’ resorts to those very underhand tactics that he claims to abhor and takes the help of that very organization which has disgraced him!”

Most damaging of all, Abbas couldn’t see a hero in Ranbir’s character. “The boss (Manish Chowdhary) is so over-the-top he belongs to another sensibility altogether, calls Ranbir a ‘bastard’ several times, humiliates and disgraces him publicly. We wait for our hero to have his revenge on the boorish boss. I completely believe in the old-fashioned Hindi film formula where the hero gives his tormentor tit for tat. But Boss, where’s the comeuppance for the villain? In fact the story comes across more as the boss’ redemption story as the hero’s.”

Abbas is now more than sure what he wants to do with his own hero John Abraham in 1-800-Love at the end. “I want my hero to either win or die at the end. Not a hero whose fight for the right simply peters out to a dead-end.”

In fact Abbas’s disappointment with Rocket Singh Salesman Of The Year has given him a renewed creative strength. “I now know exactly how my hero’s journey to end. I’m an old-fashioned storyteller. And we’ve at heart a very traditional audience. They want to see the hero triumph at the end, not walk away from the villain as he makes an apology speech.”

BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Delhi-6 to rerelease a year later with a new tragic ending. The new version will have Abhishek Bachchan’s character dying

By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; December 30, 2009)


A year after the release of the ill-received Delhi-6, director Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra is set to release the film with a new tragic ending.

The film was originally planned with Abhishek Bachchan’s character’s death at the end. Mehra, apparently with considerable pressure from his producer, UTV, decided to alter the ending to a happy one. Incidentally, Abhishek had strongly advised his director-friend against the ending.

Delhi 6

A member of the cast says, “Abhishek and Rakeysh had many arguments on the subject. The producers felt that audiences will react adversely to Abhishek’s character dying. Although Rakeysh was unhappy with it, he shot the alternate ending.”

Now a year later, the character Roshan will die in a new version of the film to be released very shortly. Confirming these developments, Rakeysh says, “I made a mistake. I should have gone with my original script with the tragic ending. Going by the reactions I got after I showed the newly edited film at the Venice Film Festival in September, I am sure this is the right version of Delhi-6.”

The new version will coincide with Rakeysh embarking on his next directorial project, apparently the historical Mirza Sahibaan, which the director is now in the process of casting.

Rakeysh Mehra

Rakeysh is also set to begin a professional story bank within his production house. The director says, “While there is an acute shortage of writers in our cinema, new writers seem to have no access to the mainstream banners. We want to give these writers a chance to bring their talents to our company.”

Rakeysh will also be introducing new directorial talent. “I am surprised at the number of new talented writer-directors who are coming to us with wonderful innovative ideas. I want to make these talented filmmakers a part of my team. I can’t make all the films that I want to. These directors can make some of them.”

Shiney Ahuja’s character in Sudhir Mishra’s Hitman has been changed from an assassin to a repentant assassin, lest the role hampers his case

By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 06, 2009)

Filmmaker Sudhir Mishra, who has been a mentor and friend to Shiney Ahuja, has once again proved his affection for the actor. Sudhir, who is doing Hitman with the actor, is shaping Shiney’s lead role in the film in such a way that it doesn’t harm his precarious position vis-à-vis the judiciary.

 

Sudhir Mishra Shiney Ahuja

The actor is out on bail after being imprisoned for alleged charges of raping his domestic help.

Confirming the news, Sudhir says, “Hitman is the story of an assassin who looks back on his violent life the day that he thinks he will die. We will certainly not show him in a light that will hamper his case or image. My writer, Vinitesh is putting together the character in a way that it doesn’t clash with Shiney’s interests. In my film, he is a repentant hitman. We want the law to take its course, but at the same time, we want Shiney to feel he is part of the mainstream.”

Sudhir, who speaks regularly with Shiney, who’s now in Delhi, says the actor had not quite recovered from his 100-day trauma. “He probably never will. No one can fully recover from such an ordeal. But at least friends should make him feel welcome and comfortable. If, as you say, he is being ostracised, then it’s really sad. Now that he is out, Shiney needs to lead a normal life, which he is struggling with currently. At the moment, he’s struggling hard to get back to being the way he was. I introduced Shiney because I had full faith in him as an actor and a human being. The only reason Shiney is not in my recent films is because he didn’t suit the roles.”