Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘expectations

By Taran Adarsh, January 1, 2010 – 12:31 IST

Surprise, surprise, surprise! Sometimes, the expectations from a movie are zilch, but what unfolds on screen is beyond expectations. It surprises you, to put it simply.

On face-value, BOLO RAAM looks like it’s straight out of 1970s cinema. A movie with predictability written all over it. A movie that carries zero hype and matches it with zero content. But BOLO RAAM isn’t archaic, isn’t the usual masala, isn’t zero content.

A remake of the Tamil film RAAM [2005; starring Jeeva, Saranya, Rehman, Murali], BOLO RAAM has an interesting plot with an engaging screenplay that compels you to look at the screen for most parts of the movie. But, of course, there’re hiccups. A few non-actors and a done to death climax could’ve been avoided.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Raam [Rishi Bhutani] is charged with the murder of his mother Archana [Padmini Kolhapure]. Raam falls into a state of shock, brief psychotic disorder, after his mother’s death and becomes silent, refusing to talk or react in any manner.

The investigating officer, Indrajeet Singh Rathi [Om Puri] is puzzled and unable to make Raam speak. He consults a psychiatrist, Dr. Negi [Naseeruddin Shah], to determine the cause of Raam’s state of mind and the reason for his silence.

Rathi interrogates various personalities for the case, questioning Raam. Every possible motive that Raam might have for murdering his mother is explored. Furthermore, Raam’s neighbours, Sub-Inspector Sajid Khan’s [Govind Namdev] daughter Juhi [Disha Pandey] and son Sameer [Krishan Khatra], are summoned by Rathi for interrogation. Will his silence solve the puzzle?

Without wasting any time, BOLO RAAM takes off from its opening titles itself. The story goes back and forth, several new characters are introduced, but the narrative stays faithful to the main plot. The best is reserved for the second half. Layer after layer is peeled with expertise. The viewer is keen to know the identity of the killer and that’s when the film fumbles and tumbles.

The culprit’s track is sloppy and a major put off. In fact, the circumstances that lead to the murder are quite amateurish and look far from convincing. Surely, the writer could’ve thought of a better culmination. Also, the one-sided love affair is functional.

Debutante director Rakesh Chaturvedi ‘Om’ makes a confident debut, although he should’ve cast some better actors for key roles. There’s not much scope for music [Sachin Gupta] in the film and hence, just one song merits mention – ‘Maa Tere Jaisa’. The background score [Sanjay Chowdhury] deserves special mention.

Newcomer Rishi Bhutani does a commendable job. He oozes confidence, despite sharing the same frame with accomplished actors. Om Puri gets into the skin of his character and is impressive, while Padmini Kolhapure is a pleasure to watch after a long gap. She is beautifully restrained. Naseeruddin Shah has a brief role and the veteran does it well. Govind Namdev is very good.

Rajpal Yadav is wasted. Both Disha Pandey and Krishan Khatra are non-actors. Manoj Pahwa does his usual act.

On the whole, BOLO RAAM has decent merits [hence those 2 stars], but the problem is its wrong release timing. It won’t stand a chance in front of a hurricane called 3 IDIOTS.

RARING TO GO! Madhavan
Madhavan about his link-up with Kangna Ranaut and more in a chat with Deepali Dhingra

Sitting in his plush apartment on the 27th floor of the residential complex he stays in, Madhavan is a picture of restlessness. He directs the photographer on how to capture his moods, takes us for a walk around his house where he shows us airplanes he’s designed and the visit includes even a trip to the garage, where he keeps his prized posession, his bike! The actor vrooms around, for the photographer’s benefit before settling down with an amused expression on being enquired about the buzz between him and Kangna Ranaut, his co-star from Tanu Weds Manu. “Is there a rumour?” he enquires, “Well, then what do I say? I lead a very boring life. Either that or I’m too smart!” he laughs, when we make the observation that one hasn’t heard of too many link-ups when it comes to him. So what’s the scene between him and Kangna actually? “She’s an amazing professional. On the sets, she, her sister, her dog and I were a gang. That’s about it!” he says firmly. Okay point noted. Madhavan would rather talk about his other films 3 Idiots and Teen Patti, where he gets to be in the esteemed company of Amitabh Bachchan and Sir Ben Kingsley. “In 3 Idiots, I’m back again with Aamir Khan and Sharman Joshi after Rang De Basanti, so there was added pressure of living upto the expectations of the audience,” he says. And no, he wasn’t apprehensive about playing a college student at this age. “We’re not horrible old men with pot-bellies and sagging skin!” he exclaims, “It was about getting the lingo and body language correct.” As for Teen Patti, he just can’t get over having Big B all to himself, even if is for a few scenes. “We played golf in between shots and I have to say, they were the greatest singular most important moments of my life,” he smiles.


Working with Sir Ben Kingsley on the other hand, Madhavan can only attribute to karma. “I’d not thought of acting till I saw him in Gandhi, so I guess there has to be something like karma for me to be acting alongside him,” he adds.

Maddy, as he’s fondly called, wants to do what he calls masti films now. “I’m tired of doing meaningful films!” the actor chuckles, “The kind of cinema I did, I was doing to satisfy my ego. Now I don’t want to play the nice guy anymore — I want to catch the bull by the horns!” And by that, he means doing light-hearted roles, including romance and comedy. “I want to do some roles now that are closer to me in real life. God has made some creations who are made to enjoy life, I’m one of them!” he smiles. And he couldn’t have said it better.
BOMBAY TIMES (December 8, 2009)

IANS (Mid-Day; November 7, 2009)

 

One of Bollywood’s most bankable stars, Emraan Hashmi, says people have contantly tried to pull him down. He also believes the new film “Tum Mile” will present him in a new avatar, having mostly essayed roles with shades of grey.

 

“In the kind of industry I am, every creative person has a judgement to make about someone else’s performance. After doing a movie, I may think that I have come up with my best act, but others may think otherwise. You can’t help it,” shrugs Emraan, 30.

“This is something that has happened ever since I made my debut with ‘Footpath’. I went on to deliver successful films practically every year with ‘Murder’, ‘Zeher’ and ‘Aashiq Banaya Aapne’ followed by ‘Aksar’ and ‘Gangster’. Still people have tried to pull me down,” Emraan said in an interview.

He is sitting pretty on the back to back success of “Raaz – The Mystery Continues” and “Jannat”. A year earlier, he came up with one of the best ever acts of his career in “Awarapan”.

And now he is about to be seen in “Tum Mile”, his most expensive film till date that will release Nov 13. It co-stars Soha Ali Khan.

“It’s a welcome change to have absolutely no grey shades in my character,” says Emraan.

He is positive that after the release of the film, he would be looked upon as someone who can also show a sensitive side.

“For that opportunity, I am thankful to my director Kunal Deshmukh. If not for him, I would have continued playing the kind of roles I have been successful in. In fact, when Kunal spoke to me about the role, I was sceptical because I have never played a full-on romantic guy before.”

He isn’t overtly bothered about certain negative statements about him. “Honestly, I don’t even look aside to see who is around for competition. There is nothing wrong if people choose to reserve certain remarks for me.

“To each his own since I have to basically live up to my own judgement and fulfil the expectations of those who matter,” he says.

He has his fair share of admirers and supporters though.

“Yes, there are some out there who have been quite supportive throughout my career,” he agrees. “My goal is to keep delivering successful solo hero films and also do an occasional multi-hero film if I have an equal part. This is why I agreed to do Milan Luthria’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Mumbai’.”

While he has been doing well as an actor after spending more than half a decade in the industry, does he have any plans to turn producer?

“I don’t want to be in the hot seat,” shoots Emraan in a tone of mock horror. “Mukeshji (Bhatt) tells me that being a producer is the toughest job in the world. I agree with him since he has decades of filmmaking experience.

“Today I am happy being an actor. Any aspirations to be producer are best kept on hold for a later stage.”

QGM

A film like Quick Gun Murugan can easily please its audience. Reason is simple-it doesn’t give a chance to its audience to complain that the film is nonsense because the film is indeed nonsensical and audiences are well aware of it before venturing to see it. And this is what makes Quick Gun Murugun an entertainer-it fulfills all the expectations associated with it. It is illogical, the characters are weird and it is a complete spoof. And most importantly, the film is unique!

The story of the movie: Quick Gun Murugun (Dr. Rajendraprasad) is a South Indian cowboy who feels it’s his duty to destroy evil. He decides to teach Rice Plate Reddy (Naseer) a lesson after he learns that Reddy is converting all vegetarian restaurants into non-veg in a village in South India. Unfortunately, QGM fails to finish his ‘duty’ and is transported to Swarglok and from there to present-day Mumbai. Reddy is now a rich man and is about to begin a chain of restaurants, called McDosa which would provide world’s first and the best non-veg Dosa! QGM plans to stop him. On the other hand, our hero is in a dilemma when he comes across voluptuous Mango Dolly (Rambha) who loves him like crazy. But QGM feels he can’t think of any girl other than his first love Locket Girl (Anu Menon). How Quick Gun Murugun solves his ‘problems’ is what the film is all about!

In the entire duration of 90 minutes, senseless but humourous situations take place in the film and majority of them are pretty impressive. Of course, the specialty of the film is its action sequences. The action scenes are literally out of this world and kudos to the screenwriter and director for coming up with such stuff!

The storyline too is novel. The villain here is kidnapping. Whom, you may ask. The mothers who are the best cooks! Murugun reunites with his elder brother with a shooting spree in the latter’s house, destroying many articles in the home and the mother is looking at them, happily! And Murugun’s first love, Locket Girl, stays in a locket throughout the film and gives suggestions to our hero! I’ve said enough but there are many more such hilarious situations in the film! Go, watch it for yourself.

The minuses of the film are its gory violence. There’s too much bloodshed in the film which not appeal to some audiences. Also, killing an important character in the climax was just not done.

Everyone here in the film was at its best. Dr Rajendraprasad charms with his brilliant performance. His character needed a certain kind of style and the actor was able to fulfill this demand. Naseer was equally good as the villain. Raju Sundaram (as Rowdy MBA, Reddy’s right hand) played the coolest character in the film and performed wonderfully. His style and the background score created especially for him make Rowdy MBA a memorable character!

QGM2

Rambha was perfect for her role and look every inch the hot plump seductress. Shanmughraja as Gunpowder was hilarious. Ashwin Mushran as Dr Jango and Sandhya Mridul as the news reporter were okay. Vinay Pathak as Chitragupta was impressive. Ranvir Shorey was there only for a 12-second scene but was damn funny.

Sagar Desai’s music works well as it’s in sync with the mood of the film. The song ‘Chat Mangni Lover’ is the best song of the lot. Hear it to believe it!  Daniel George’s background score was loud and heroic and just that was expected for such a film. Sham Kaushal’s action scenes were the highlight of the film. Visual effects by Prime Focus were a treat.

Rajesh Devraj wrote the story, screenplay and dialogues. It excels almost completely in all departments. However, it would have been better if he had come up with even more hilarious and unexpected scenes in the film. It would have worked wonders. And Shashanka Ghosh, the director, who had earlier made Waisa Bhi Hota Hai-Part II, does a fine job. It requires guts to come up with such a film and Ghosh, knowing his job well, manages to do justice to the plot.

Some of the best scenes of the movie:
1.   QGM’s duel with Gunpowder
2.   The resignation letter scene
3.   QGM reuniting with his brother
4.   Mothers getting kidnapped
5.   Rowdy MBA at QGM’s house
6.   QGM’s duel with Rowdy MBA (excellent scene)
7.   QGM’s scenes with Mango Dolly
8.   The dabba wala sequence
9.   The climax and the final scene

On the whole, Quick Gun Murugun entertains. The writer-director duo comes up with a zany film and although they could have done an even better job, the film is still worth watching, at home, if not in theatre. Your money and time won’t go waste, I say!

My rating-*** out of 5!

This review first appeared on MouthShut.com: http://www.mouthshut.com/review/Quick_Gun_Murugun-173813-1.html

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