Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘flashback

BIRTHDAY BOY: BT caught Dharmendra in a relaxed mood at home
Dharmendra on his 75th birthday and start of a new innings in Bollywood

ROSHNI K OLIVERA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 8, 2009)

Yoga, 30 minutes of cycling, and some free form exercises… that’s how Bollywood’s original he-man and endearing actor Dharmendra will start his day today. It’s not just another day. It’s Garam Dharam’s 75th birthday, and while his family and well-wishers are excited, for the man himself it’s only another “beautiful day” that he might spend at his farmhouse in Lonavala.

Life, as a whole, is a celebration for Dharmendra. ‘Be happy and spread cheer all around you’ has always been his mantra. “I am a very emotional person. I love people. I want to see genuine warmth in human beings where there is no artificiality, only true care and concern. There should be harmony all around,” is his birthday wish.

Talking about celebrations, he says it’s a personal choice not to celebrate his birthday. “I stopped doing so after my mother passed away in 1985. She used to be very excited about my birthday… bahut chahel pahel machati thi,” he fondly recounts. But, wishes from across the globe are going to pour in today, as they have over the years. He’s just received a beautiful t-shirt from a girl in New Zealand and a call from a group of 80 boys from Gwalior, who will be donating blood in his name today. Overwhelmed by the affection, Dharmendra says, “It’s this love from my well-wishers that keeps me going. In fact, recently after I appeared on Dus Ka Dum, I received so many letters from people asking me to do more films and make more appearances on TV.” Audiences’ response to Apne, Johnny Gaddar and Life in a Metro has given him tremendous motivation and he’s all set, looking forward to his next innings. “I want to do more films and do good films. I like to see myself on posters. Who doesn’t?” he smiles. A career spanning 50 years in Bollywood (this is his 50th year) and with a number of hit films to his credit, Dharmendra’s seen it all. He’s played the diehard romantic, action hero, and also done comedy. But ask him about his favourite genre and he says he loves every form of acting. He was born to be an actor and will continue to pursue his passion with as much gusto.

On his birthday, as he goes into flashback mode, when he first came to this city of dreams, when he signed his first film and faced the camera for the first time, one can see the same excitement and charm that he may have exuded then. Nothing’s changed… he’s as fit and handsome, his face radiating the same exhilaration even today when it’s ‘lights, camera, action’ time.
Advertisements

TM

Any kind of calamity, whether natural or man-made, is immediately picked up by the film fraternity to capture the event in celluloid. The 26 July 2005 Mumbai deluge was one of the biggest natural disasters in India in this decade and surprisingly, no film, comprising A-listers was based on it yet. Finally, Tum Mile takes the initiative. It’s a love story and the floods serve as a backdrop. Unfortunately, the ‘flood’ connection wasn’t utilized well and hence, the film fails to impress fully.

The story of the movie: Akshay (Emraan Hashmi) and Sanjana (Soha Ali Khan) become friends when they both were based in Cape Town. Although Akshay was struggling painter and Sanjana was a creative writer cum environmentalist and a daughter of a rich billionaire (Sachin Khedekar), they both hit off well and fall in love. They decide to move in. Unfortunately, both face problems, more so because of Akshay’s financial insecurity. Finally, both have to break up. Six years later, they meet each other once again in a London-Mumbai flight. Things have drastically changed for both Akshay and Sanjana now. However, once they land in Mumbai, they have to go through a roller coaster ride as heavy rains have crippled the entire city. The date was July 26, 2005. They have no choice but to be together in this dark time.

Let’s get one thing straight-although Tum Mile was promoted as a film based on floods, it is actually not. 70% of the film is Emraan-Soha’s flashback in Cape Town. The remaining 30% focuses on the deluge. However, the story wonderfully moves from the present to flashback and back and that’s why the film works a bit.

The first scene of the film is in fact the best one! Weather dept officials who were more interested in playing cards than looking at the warning they received about a downpour just a day before July 26 is a rocking scene! It gives an indication that how the careless attitude of these officials led to a disaster.

The first half of the film has no glitches. The flashback portion begins wonderfully and goes ahead nicely too. Also the scene inside the flight were well executed. The intermission point was scary. However, problems start in the second hour. The flashback scenes quite dragged. Director Kunal Deshmukh could and should have had a crisp narrative. The problems faced by the couple in the floods were engrossing but the climax disappointed. The way both Emraan and Soha accept each other in the climax (after the rains stopped) seemed little indigestible, because their interactions with each other was very limited during the time of crisis. But then it is said, “When you bond during a crisis, the bonding goes deep”. So maybe only the very limited bonding was more than enough for the characters!

The visual effects in the film at some places were tacky and could have been better. The film also exhibits some of the actual footage depicting the horrors of 26/7. But that doesn’t work. Also, factual errors can be noticed-the lead actors are shown wading through chest-deep water in Lower Parel area of Mumbai. However, nothing of that sort had happened there on that day.. In fact, it was in the suburban areas like Juhu, Kalina etc where water had arisen till the first floors. However, some of the horrors of that day were wonderfully captured. Most notable is how the central locking system caused the death of many inside the car after their car’s doors and windows failed to open.

TM2

Emraan Hashmi and Soha Ali Khan carry the film on their shoulders wonderfully. Emraan delivers a sparkling performance and proves that he’s one of the best performers around. He looked charming, esp in the flashback portions. However, his bespectacled look in the present track is not as great as the similar one he had in Gangster. But still, he manages to do a great job. Watch out for him when he’s high-tempered and in the scene where he enthusiastically paints Soha. A fine actor indeed!

Soha Ali Khan too comes up with a brilliant performance-one of the best of her careers after RDB and Khoya Khoya Chand. She appears confident and it’s great to see that she slipped into her role so easily. Actually, she wasn’t the original choice-Esha Deol was offered the role initially. After she refused due to some reason, Soha was approached!

Mantra, who plays Emraan’s pal, also gives a confident performance. Sachin Khedekar was impressive. Others were good.

Pritam’s music was one of the USPs of the film. The 3 songs which completely rock are the title song, Tu Hi Haqeeqat and Dil Ibaadat. Watch out for Dil Ibaadat-it was just brilliantly executed!

Prakash Kutty’s cinematography was flawless. So was the design.

There was nothing wrong in the story; it was the screenplay that failed at places. Ideally, equal emphasis should have been there for both the tracks. The flood portions were underutilized. Although Kunal Deshmukh’s first venture Jannat was fantastic, Tum Mile isn’t, unfortunately.

Some of the best scenes of the film:
1.       The first scene
2.       Akshay restructures Sanjana’s cake
3.       The title song and Dil Ibaadat
4.       Akshay’s confrontation with the curator
5.       Sachin Khedekar’s only scene
6.       Akshay and Sanjana’s argument the next day
7.       The intermission point
8.       Akshay and Sanjana in the bus and in cracked building

On the whole, Tum Mile unfortunately doesn’t work in totality. Performances and music were brilliant but the film was too dragged for no reason. But the film doesn’t bore even for a moment and the first half was great. Watch it if you are an Emraan/Bhatt fan!

My rating-** ½ out of 5!

This review first appeared on MouthShut.com: http://www.mouthshut.com/review/Tum_Mile-179553-1.html

TM4

By Subhash K. Jha, August 8, 2009 – 11:45 IST

Pritam Chakraborty We’ve heard bits and pieces and even entire songs from films being scrapped. But Love Aaj Kal (LAK) takes the cake. While the recession and the multiplex strike proved a curse for the rest of the industry, it proved a blessing for Pritam. He was able to scrap and re-do the entire score.

Says Pritam, “I saw the film with Imtiaz and my lyricist Irshad Kamal in January. I was horrified. I very bluntly told Imtiaz the music in LAK was not working. You have to understand, Imtiaz is the most chilled-out guy. He didn’t flinch when I told him this. He immediately told me to do what had to be done.”

The first thing that needed to be changed in the soundtrack was the absence of a love ballad. Says Pritam, “LAK was a love story and there was no love song! Imtiaz wanted to know where it could fit in. I suggested we put it in the flashback in the Kolkata portion. Imtiaz was in Kolkata and was supposed to fly to Delhi to shoot ‘Chor Bazaari‘ in a couple of days. I flew to Kolkata and gave him a love song. He didn’t like it. Then I came up with ‘Aaj Din Chadhiya‘…over the phone! In fact most of tunes were played by me and approved by Imtiaz on the phone. That includes ‘Chor Bazaari‘,” reveals Pritam.

The ballad ‘Main Kya Hoon‘ was also altered. “It was earlier designed as a fast-paced go-for-the-kill ballad. But then I changed the pace and profile of the number.”

Barring ‘Twist‘, the entire score was scrapped and redone just a few months ago. The secret was out when the film’s ebullient music composer in the course of our conversation revealed how after the film was ready, he suggested to Imtiaz Ali that there should be an item song at the end of the film, just like in Jab We Met.

Says Pritam, “Imtiaz said, ‘Get me a song like ‘Mauja Hi Mauja‘ that ended Jab We Met. And you’re on’. That’s how ‘Ahun Ahun‘ which comes at the of LAK was born. It’s a traditional Punjabi folk song.” Then began the hunt to get the copyrights.

“While getting the rights for the been music from Nagin was easy, getting the rights for this folk song proved impossible since it has originally been sung by 18 singers many of them from Pakistan. So we just credited it as ‘traditional’. Let’s hope no one comes forward to claim a slice of the song,” Pritam has his fingers crossed.

Only two lines from the traditional track were used, the rest was all by Pritam. “Luckily Imtiaz loved the number and that’s how the end-song in LAK happened.”

BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM


Advertisements

  • animales perdidos en granada: En esta imagen van a ver en detalle los niveles de la Deep Web (que es más profunda de lo que algunos pueden pensar). http://cheerfuldepicti57.blox
  • Phen375 Weight Loss: Lots of useful information as well as terrific write-up too. I have currently subscribed to your blog site combined with I am bookmarking it for fu
  • mojecyfrowe.pl: Current research has shown that a sedentary lifestyle could be very bad in your health.