Fenil and Bollywood

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VIR SANGHVI (Hindustan Times)

Here are two images you may remember from television. The first was the Oscar ceremony. Simon Beaufoy won the Oscar for best adapted screenplay for Slumdog Millionaire. It is no secret that Beaufoy’s script differed significantly from the book by Vikas Swarup on which Slumdog was based. But Beaufoy made it a point to thank Swarup on stage and to say that without his book there would be no screenplay, no movie, and no Oscars.

Later that same night Slumdog director Danny Boyle, while accepting his own Oscar, apologised to the choreographer Longinus, whose name had been left out of the end credits of Slumdog. When the film won the Best Picture Oscar, the entire unit went on stage including Vikas Swarup who had been flown in to Los Angeles by the makers of the film at their expense.

And here is a second image. It is a press conference in Noida on Friday. The cast and makers of 3 Idiots are answering questions from the press as part of the publicity campaign for the film. When journos keep asking about the lack of recognition accorded to author Chetan Bhagat, on whose book the film is based, producer Vidhu Vinod Chopra stands up, points a finger at an inquisitive journalist and shouts ‘Shut up’. Chopra is prevented from saying much more by his colleagues and Aamir Khan then swings into damage control mode. He tries to sound reasonable but manages to abuse Chetan Bhagat, calls him publicity hungry — a bit rich considering the stunts Aamir staged to gain publicity for 3 Idiots — and berates journos for believing Bhagat.

What is the difference between the two images?

I think one word sums it up: grace.

Danny Boyle, Simon Beaufoy and the Slumdog unit behaved with grace. Vinod Chopra and his star behaved with a complete lack of grace.

If you’ve missed the controversy, here’s what it is about. Vidhu Vinod Chopra bought the rights to Chetan Bhagat’s novel and then turned it into 3 Idiots. Nobody disputes that 3 Idiots is based on the Bhagat novel and indeed Bhagat is credited as such in the movie.

The point of discord is the placing of the credit. Bhagat suggests that it should have been at the beginning along with all the other writer credits. Instead it appears at the very end.

In his defence, Chopra says that the end is an appropriate place for the credit because his scriptwriters, including Rajkumar Hirani, the film’s director, changed so much of the story that the final film has little to do with Bhagat’s novel.

Bhagat says that this is not true. Yes of course there is a lot in the film that he did not write but it is still recognisably his story and on his blog he lists several points of similarity.

For the purposes of argument, I am quite prepared to believe Aamir and Chopra when they deny Bhagat’s version of events. I am also prepared to accept that the screenplay is significantly different from Bhagat’s novel.

But here’s the thing: it shouldn’t make a difference.

Vidhu Vinod Chopra is contractually obliged to give Bhagat credit as the writer of the source material for the movie. So, the issue is not whether the script is 95 per cent based on the book or 25 per cent derived from Bhagat’s novel. The only issue is one of placing. Should Bhagat have been part of the opening credits? And was it graceless to bury his name in the end credits?

In Hollywood, it is not uncommon for scriptwriters to significantly alter the plots of source material or to only use a part of the book. Slumdog differs significantly from Vikas Swarup’s Q&A. The Firm dispenses with John Grisham’s ending and invents a new one. In Papillon, a major character who was not even in the book was invented by the scriptwriters. David Lean’s Dr Zhivago junked the second half of the book. The recent My Sister’s Keeper differs substantially from Jodi Picoult’s bestseller of the same name.

In every single case, however, the original novel was properly credited and the author mentioned in the opening credits. Nobody believed that this detracted in any way from the screenwriter’s achievements. It just demonstrated a certain grace and honesty on the part of the movie’s maker.

So why, you may well ask, is Vidhu Vinod Chopra being so bloody-minded about denying Chetan Bhagat his opening credit?

The honest answer is I simply cannot understand Chopra’s pettiness.

I hold no brief for any of the principals in this drama. At the HT, we’ve had a bad experience with Chetan Bhagat, who we believe behaved unprofessionally when he was a columnist. On the other hand, I have met Vinod Chopra, have worked with his wife and have always thought well of him. Personally, I have the highest regard and admiration for Aamir Khan, whom I know slightly.

So, this is not about personalities. It’s not even about principle — Chopra has conceded the principle by giving Bhagat his credit even if he has buried it in the end.

It is about grace.

What does it cost the makers of 3 Idiots to give Chetan Bhagat his credit in the space where a writer’s credit is traditionally placed in the international movie business? It would make no difference to the movie’s massive box-office performance. We would not think any less of Rajkumar Hirani, a fine director with a great track record. And Aamir’s reputation as the most consistently successful star of our times would remain intact.

Finally, it comes down to how big a human being is prepared to be. Even people who did not think much of Slumdog Millionaire were overwhelmed when Danny Boyle used the Oscar platform to say sorry to Longinus for leaving his name out of the credits. That was the single-biggest night in Boyle’s life, a culmination of everything he had worked for. And he still found the time to mention an Indian dance director he would probably never meet again.

That’s what I call class.

Our own film industry, however, has not covered itself in glory by the way in which it has behaved over Bhagat’s credit. Our producers, directors and actors have come across as mean-spirited and petty and ready to get into fights over something as minor as the placing of a credit.

Just as India has the potential to become a superpower in the 21st century so Bollywood has the opportunity to become the world’s leading film industry in this century. Certainly, we are not short of talent or of audiences.

What we are short of, however, is grace. And our directors need to learn that no amount of box-office success can buy you class. Our film industry will never hit the big time if its leading lights continue to think like small-timers.

It’s time for Aamir, Chopra and Hirani to show some grace. Otherwise they risk coming across as three idiots.

The views expressed by the author are personal

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MINAKSHI SAHNI (Hindustan Times; December 21, 2009)

https://i0.wp.com/www.hindustantimes.com/images/HTEditImages/Images/Aamir-3Idiots.jpgAamir Khan may be going to town calling himself an idiot in a bid to promote his upcoming movie, but if the producers of 3 idiots and Delhi’s multiplex owners have their way, it is the moviegoer who may end up feeling like an idiot. With one of the most anticipated movies of the year set to hit theatres on Christmas, multiplex owners have decided to hike ticket prices for the movie by as much as 35 per cent. In short, a movie outing for four, which would otherwise cost Rs 600-800, would rob you by nearly Rs 2,000!

Reap when ripe
“We are looking at an increase of 20-30 per cent on weekdays and 35 per cent on the weekends across all our properties,” says Deepak Taluja of Fun Cinemas, explaining that multiplexes can increase ticket prices only twice a year and they look forward to the release of much awaited films to maximise on the opportunity. “Distributors approached us with this idea. So for 3 idiots, whose booking opens on Wednesday, we have increased our morning show price by 33 per cent with a marginal increase in others,” adds Rehan Ahmad of SRS Cinemas. PVR Cinemas and Satyam Cineplex while confirming an increase in ticket prices for 3 idiots, refused to divulge the exact hike, saying their management would meet to decide.

All izz not well
Shocked at the prospect of shelling out anywhere between Rs 350-1,000 (gold class) for a single ticket, youngsters are already feeling the pinch. “You can’t be sucking money just because the movie is highly anticipated,” says communication consultant Pupul Sinha, 26. College goers, who prefer the morning shows, are equally annoyed. “We are the worst hit of the lot,” says Fine Arts student Mahima Saraswat.

“Are we idiots? Who will pay so much, no matter how good a film is?” asks engineering student Mohit Sahni raising another vital point. “By doing this, they are inviting people to opt for the pirated version,” he adds.

The film’s producer Vidhu Vinod Chopra, when contacted, said, “Talk to the cinema halls as I have no say in it.” But a source from the production revealed, “3 Idiots is a film people won’t mind shelling extra money for. That’s the strategy behind this decision.”

It is going to pinch
A morning show ticket usually costs Rs 50-75. The price may go well above Rs 150 – 200.

Gold Class tickets in PVRs may go up from Rs 850 to Rs 1000.

Multiplexes had increased their prices marginally when Om Shanti Om, Ghajini and Kambakkht Ishq had released.

While multiplexes are looking to hike ticket prices, single screen theatres want to counter this by going ahead with same prices [Rs 70-80 for Balcony, Rs 50-60 for Rear Stall and Rs 20-40 for the Front Stall]. Says RK Malhotra of Delite, “It is going to be unfair on the audience and secondly it is a win-win situation for us.” “The film is meant for college students, so a price hike would affect business negatively,” says Kishan of Sheila cinema.


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