Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘humanity

ON AIR: Kareena at the Radio Mirchi Studios. Tune into 98.3FM for the songs from Kurbaan and Kareena’s interview

Kareena Kapoor talks to Radio Mirchi’s listeners about the initiative and her new film

REAGAN GAVIN RASQUINHA Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; November 16, 2009)

While last year’s terror attacks during 26/11 left us dazed and confused, stories about acts of outstanding bravery, kindness and generosity also abound. Acts that make us proud to be from this city. Highlights in a cloud of grey, that let us know that humanity shines through no matter what. Mumbai will never forget the bravery displayed by the NSG, the policemen or the firemen.

To honour these heroes, Radio Mirchi has organised a special screening of the film Kurbaan. Kareena Kapoor was recently on Radio Mirchi’s Sunset Samosa with RJ Suren to talk about this initiative and her upcoming film. Visiting the Radio Mirchi studio after a gap of six years, the stunning actress spoke about her role in the film. She said, “I think this is one of my best roles after Jab We Met, so I am very excited about it. Karan came up with ‘Some love stories have blood on them’ because the film is very intense; blood here refers to the pain.”

Produced by Dharma productions and directed by debutant director Rensil D’Silva, Kurbaan stars Saif Ali Khan, Kareena Kapoor, Vivek Oberoi, Kirron Kher and Om Puri. Salim-Suleiman who are the music directors have given a fantastic score for the film which can be heard on Radio Mirchi. Suleiman’s favourite here is a song called “Rasiya, as it is has dark undertones and really sets the mood for the images it accompanies in the film.” On her part, Kareena continues, “The lyrics of all the songs are beautiful. Ali Maula is a very gripping song; the film comes to life in this song.” The popular Shukran Allah is already climbing the charts.

Pleased with the special initiative take by Mirchi, Kareena asked Radio Mirchi listeners to nominate those people they know who helped out during 26/11. The nominees will be able to attend the special screening of Kurbaan where the lead star Saif Ali Khan will also be present.
reagan.gavin@timesgroup.com
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Very often in life the people whom we love the most let us down the most. In ‘Shob Charitro Kalponik’, sensitive storytelling wizard from Kolkata, Rituparno Ghosh takes his protagonist, the unhappy wife Radhika, on a journey that opens doors within her heart that she would have liked to remain closed.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Review

Ghosh occupies the two mutually exclusive yet inseparable world of art and reality with a fluency and effortlessness that takes his characters far beyond the cartel of prototypes.

We see Radhika, trapped in state of marital unhappiness, as not just woman struggling to keep her home and heart together, but also as an individual trying to find her identity against odds that are created mainly in her own mind.

Orson Welles style, the ‘real’ personality of the dead poet emerges in flashbacks that are more cursory than comprehensive. But when has life ever offered complete solutions to the riddle of marriage that has puzzled man and woman for centuries?

Echoes that reach back to the very core of humanity reverberate across this miniature masterpiece on marriage and fidelity. Ghosh’s forte is the unspoken word. The bonds that form between Radhika and her maid and between Radhika and her colleague (Jisshu Sengupta) rely on resonances beyond the rhetoric of interactive art. The director creates room in cramped spaces.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Most of Ghosh’s narrative are vibrant vignettes behind closed doors done up in deep shades of anguish and bitterness. The progression towards a mellower comprehension of the tenderness behind the seeming spousal insensitivity begins after the husband’s death. The irony of loving a spouse after he’s gone is far from lost.

Radhika’s tormented understanding of her dead poet husband’s inner world is laced with luminous moments of revelatory tragedy, leading up to a finale that’s surreal and introspective. The hallucinogenic conclusion where Radhika enters her husband’s poetic world is charming, controlled and yet frightening.

Ghosh’s cinematographer Soumik Haldar shoots the interior of Radhika’s home as a manifestation of her innermost turmoil. She paces the bedroom, speaks to her dead husband, scolds and accuses him, as the family’s silently-observant maid tries to come to terms with the enormity of Radhika’s self-recrimination and loss.

The film is a work suffused with longing for a world that has slipped out of the protagonist’s fingers while she was counting the money in her purse. It’s the illuminating story of a woman’s voyage into the dimmed light of a yesterday that she thought was wretched.

But it was just life.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Finally, the impact of the marital tale depends completely on the central performance. As the working wife who feels her husband has let down their marriage, Bipasha pulls out all stops to deliver her career’s best performance. Her moments of anguish before and after her husband’s deaths are expressed in tones of cathartic conviction that we never knew existed within Bipasha.

In the scene where she shouts against her imaginary husband on his favourite chair, Bipasha furnishes the proceedings with the anguished portrayal of bereavement that perhaps only a Shabana Azmi can equal.

This despite the fact that Bipasha’s voice has been dubbed by a woman who doesn’t really have a say in the character’s portrayal.

But then in an ironic way, isn’t that what the character is all about? The disembodied voice is a reminder of Radhika’s dissociation from her own identity.

Somewhere in finding the centre to her marriage, Radhika lost it. And loss, as we all know, is one helluva upper for art.

Savour the delicacy of Ghosh’s poetic work. And never mind the spoken language. In a true work of art, the sound is the least important component. Listen carefully. You can hear the muffled sound of a broken heart in this film.

Rating-4/5

Source: IANS


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