Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘Langda Tyagi

Vivek Oberoi on love, life and a fresh innings in Bollywood

By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 27, 2009)


• You have got some good reviews for your role in Kurbaan.

Yes. I have not stopped smiling since the film’s release. At one of the trials, Bebo (Kareena Kapoor) and Saif (Ali Khan) did tell me that I was good in the film. Then Karan (Johar) and Rensil (D’Silva)also told me the same thing. I had not seen the film till then as I was shooting in Hyderabad. It was a nice feeling when Karan told me ‘finally you make me proud.’ I saw the film just a day before its release and I had knots in my stomach. I was very nervous but I was with people who have always been kind to me. There were Shah Rukh and Gauri, Imran and his fiancée Avantika, Yash uncle, Davidji (Dhawan). They all hugged me and said I was good.

• Why have you not done a romantic film after Saathiya?

Honestly, I really don’t know. Kurbaan has got a romantic track but Mission Istanbul and Shootout At Lokhandwala had zero romance. I have not done an out-and-out romantic film and I am really looking forward to doing one.

• People are saying that you have changed and that you want to leave the controversies behind and concentrate only on your work.

I wanted this for a really long time. However, after Shootout… things did not fall in place. Almost four years ago, when I did Omkara, I saw Saif getting under the skin of the character Langda Tyagi. I loved the work ethics. That’s when I thought that I should stop doing what I was doing, but I had a backlog to finish. Then my close friend Amit Chandra sat me down and helped me streamline my life so that I could practically achieve what I was trying to. Now, I have learnt not to take anything for granted.

• How did Ramu and you patch up?

I don’t think patch up is the right word as we were never at loggerheads. I will never have the audacity to say anything against Ramu and as an artiste, I will always be indebted to him for giving me Company. But when he called me and told me ‘I will never work with you again’, I was shocked. Now, when he called me and said that he had something for me, I was so happy. When I met him, he said that he could see the same passion in my eyes again and gave me Rakta Charitra. I felt exactly the same on the first day of Rakta Charitra that I felt on the first day on the sets of Company. Ramu made me feel so comfortable.

• You have done some amazing stunts in Prince, something which you are not known for.

Yes. Kookie Gulati is quite a whiz kid. I did so many things that I cannot possibly explain — right from learning how to skateboard, doing parkour, learning cable work, to action training. I had to put so many things into my system that after the training session, things became easier.

• You have said that you are done with apologising to people.

I made a mistake and it is human to make mistakes. Personally, I think it’s humbling and it’s also building character to stand up and say I made a mistake and please forgive me. It is always an ego-based thing to say that why should I apologise. It is a real man who can say ‘I am sorry’ and that too in public. I have said sorry to the assistant director whom I was rude to, I have said sorry to the movie star whom I had a fight with and I even said sorry to the director I snapped at.

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Saif Ali Khan learns about Islam while preparing for his role as an Islamic fundamentalist in Rensil D’Silva’s forthcoming film
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; May 05, 2009)
If your jaws dropped on seeing the prim ‘n’ propah Saif Ali Khan speak colourful language as Langda Tyagi in Omkara, you will be even more shocked to see him play an Ismalic fundamentalist in Rensil D’Silva’s forthcoming film.

Born and brought up in a non-conservative westernised atmosphere, this role has been a life-changing experience for Saif. The actor elaborates, “The role has not only made me more politically aware, it has also made me more religious. Earlier, I was more spiritual than religious. I knew a lot of things about Islam and always believed in the higher power. But when I did a lot of reading on Islam, the one most decisive thing that I learnt had to do with Allah. We tend to presume Allah to be the Muslim God. But Allah is the Arab word for the ‘same God’, or the ‘one true God’ that, I thought, was a wonderful thing to learn while doing this character. All religions believe in the oneness of God. So what’s all the fighting about? Whether it’s Christianity, Islam or Judaism, many of the religions have fought a holy war at one time or another. It’s been a part of religious history.”

It’s not often that you come across roles that change your perception about life. Saif admits that his role in Rensil’s film has not just changed his views towards life but also religion. “It’s the most politically relevant character I’ve played. Though my character Langda Tyagi in Omkara was a political creature, his politics was subverted. In Rensil’s film, I play the Jehadi as a very real and suave gentleman, dressed in very dapper clothes like a college professor and hence more frightening. I play an Islamic fundamentalist while Vivek Oberoi plays the more moderate Muslim,” says Saif.

“To me the whole point of being an actor is to become characters I can’t be in real life. My character in Rensil’s film is redeemed at the end. But even if he wasn’t, I’d still say yes to a role that explores my emotions that lie too deep for fears and tears. My character in Rensil’s film has become the way he has because of the way Americans have treated Afghanistan and other Islamic states. I don’t think 26/11 or earlier 9/11 are Islamic acts. No matter what people say, I don’t think any terrorist is a Muslim. Let’s make that distinction very clear. Of course the population of Afghanistan may disagree with me. But I condemn 26/11 as a deed done by non-Muslims,” declares Saif.


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