Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘marraige

Dia Mirza lodges a police complaint against her stalker; he has harassed her for six years

By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; December 15, 2009)



Dia Mirza must be used to getting attention all the time thanks to her pretty looks but this recent incident takes the cake as far as being admired goes. Dia was taken aback when she saw a 30-something guy on his knees with a bouquet and a ring proposing marriage to her right outside her doorstep on December 10.

At first, Dia was shocked but her domestic help and driver took her to the police station to lodge a complaint.


A source said, “The stalker has been following Dia for the last six years. When he realised that it was her birthday on December 9 and she would be receiving many bouquets, he disguised himself as a florist, fooled the building’s security guard and landed up outside her house the next day. He told her that he is well-educated and a doctor by profession. He had even got an engagement ring for her and asked her to marry him. At first Dia didn’t know what to do but she quickly got her act together and called out to her domestic help and driver. They managed to drive him away with a warning. However, Dia did not take the matter lightly and lodged a complaint at the Khar Police station. The cops are now trying to find her stalker.”

Dia confirmed the news and said, “Yes, it’s all true. I have made an official police complaint against him. I have noticed him for many years but I never bothered much as he never came in my way. However, this time he landed up at my house which was quite shocking. It was a security lapse because on my birthday(December 9) many bouquets had been sent to my house.

The next day he came to my house disguised as a florist. Thankfully, my driver, who has been with me for ten years, was present and let him off with a stern warning after which he ran away. I hope he doesn’t come back as cops are hunting for him.”

Dia continued, “He had brought a card and an engagement ring and he proposed marriage to me. He is an educated guy and is apparently a doctor but I didn’t want to take any chances. Everyone suggested that I should file a police complaint. The cops are hunting for him and they have even warned the security guards in my building.”

Abhishek Bachchan (33) was replaced in films, thrown out of some and suffered the ignonimity of having his films stalled. But he is a survivor. He talks about his journey candidly
By Indu Mirani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 26, 2009)
When did you first become aware that you were Amitabh Bachchan’s son?

From as early as I can remember because for us at home it was never like, “I am Amitabh Bachchan’s son”. He was always ‘Pa’ for us. That’s something my mother always made sure of. I was never led to believe that I was the son of this great actor and so I was special.
Did you ever resent being Amitabh Bachchan’s son?

Never never… and I don’t think that will ever happen because I thank god everyday that I have been born into the family that I am born into and that I have the loving parents I have.

Did you ever want to be anything other than an actor?

As a child you have different ambitions everyday. I was no different. But amongst those ambitions, I also wanted to be an actor and acting is the one that stayed with me. As a kid I wanted to be a fireman, astronaut, race car driver, business tycoon. As a kid you are forever dreaming and then I realised that here is a job in which you can be everything at the same time.

What about acting comes easily to you?

I don’t know what comes most easily to me. Maybe just the acceptance of the environment because this is the world I grew up in, this is the world I know.

And what is difficult?

There are certain scenes and emotions that are difficult to tackle. But that is how it should be, you shouldn’t do an easy job.

How do you overcome such moments?

At that moment, it’s sheer desperation. You come up against a road block and you do whatever it takes to overcome it. You dig deep and pull out all the stops, just go for it.

Do you find yourself referencing your dad?

With an actor of his caliber, he is a standard, a reference point for every actor.

Did you ever watch any Rajesh Khanna films?

No, I never really saw his films. As a kid I always saw dad’s films.

In retrospect, how do you react to the flak your wedding invitee list got?

What flak? That was created by the media. I was switched off it. It was my once-in-a-lifetime wedding. I didn’t want anything to alter what I felt at that time period of time. I had no idea what was going on outside my gates. For me I was going to get married to the person I loved and that was going to be my favourite memory. I don’t pay heed to these kinds of things. Do I make a big deal about the invitation list? No. I don’t expect to be invited anywhere and I don’t think anybody said, ‘Oh, I should have been invited.’ Nobody said that to me. If they have a problem they come and talk to me and I will tell them the reasons behind it. The people invited were just very close friends and family. People tend to forget I had an ailing grandmother in the hospital and it was a conscious decision on the part of the family to keep the celebrations to a minimum. I would have loved to call the entire film fraternity. Yes this is where I work, these are my people. Could I? No, and I think people should respect that and if they don’t, then, it’s their problem.

How did you deal with the 17 failures you had at the beginning of your career?

You have to deal with it. You do whatever it takes. I have always been uncomfortable talking about myself because I am not that kind of person. Some people understand it some people don’t, some people accept it, some people don’t. I am fine with it. My only focus at that point of time was to carry on working. The minute you start thinking about the negatives, you become a bitter person. And I am not bitter, I never want to be and I don’t like bitter people.

Was it difficult?

Of course, it was. I was replaced in films, I was thrown out of the films and my films shut down halfway. It’s not a pleasant feeling. Do I make a big deal out of it? No. As compared to the struggle of other people, mine looks small. Many people don’t know that when I decided to be an actor, for a year I didn’t have a job. Some people might have thought that, ‘Oh, he is Mr Bachchan’s son; he would get a job easily. And I know close to 30 directors, who are some of the big directors who said to my face, “No sorry, we don’t want to make a film with you.” It’s not like I had a line of producers outside my house. I have been to a lot of producers and directors requesting them to work with me. Thankfully JP saab came over and said, ‘I want to work with you’ and he was the first person who did and I readily accepted. So how do you deal with it? Try and be positive and keep working hard.

By the grace of God, I have a wonderful family. I was never made to look like an underachiever or a loser. They are very supportive and always encouraging, that is not to say that they are blindly supportive. If they saw a film of mine which didn’t like they would say so and tell me how to improve. They never said, ‘Oh, you are hopeless. Forget it!’ There was a point in time when I thought that about myself because when you repeatedly fail and that too on public platform and you are humiliated on a public platform, Friday to Friday, after a period of time, your zest, your confidence goes flying out of the window and you start believing it. When you have 15-16 flops in a row, common sense kicks in, saying ‘Wait a second, obviously you don’t know anything, you are doing something wrong and maybe you shouldn’t be doing this.’ I had no confidence. I couldn’t go out in public because I genuinely believed that I had failed. Then I went up to my father and said, ‘I think, I have made a mistake and I have paid for it dearly and maybe I am not meant to be actor.’ He said, “I have not brought you up to be a quitter, I have brought you up to be fighter. Keep at it. I am telling you, I am going to be your biggest critic. I am telling you that you are improving with film after film. Do whatever you get. Whatever role, small role, big role, just do it. Spend time in front of the camera so that you get the opportunity to improve and eventually prove your worth.’ And that’s what I did. I dived into work, whatever I got, I did, and thankfully after a while they started accepting me.

How important is marriage?

It’s a wonderful institution. I won’t say I am going to recommend it. If you want to get married, get married. It’s a personal choice. I have taken the step to stay with the woman I love and care for. I am happy I did. It has been a wonderful wonderful journey so far.

And kids?

Kids are great. I think part of the reason why you want to get married is that you want to settle down and start a family and have kids. I think two should be good. Ham do hamare do.

Are you part of Dhoom 3?

Dhoom 3 is not being made as of now. If Adi (Aditya Chopra) decides to make it, I am pretty sure Ali and Jay would be apart of it. It’s their story, it’s their franchise, unless they want to take a U-turn and change it completely. Dhoom 2 has been my biggest hit and that’s the character I enjoyed working on.

For years numerologists said you should drop your surname and you resisted. Do you feel vindicated now?

I don’t feel vindicated. I think it’s foolish and stupid to even suggest it. Why would I want to drop my surname? I am very proud of being a Bachchan. I am what I am because I am a Bachchan. I don’t understand the theory behind changing my name. I have a name which my grandfather gave me. I carry it with great pride and I am not going to change it because somebody else wants to change it. Your film is not going to work because you change the spelling of your name. Destiny is written for you and you have to aid it by working hard.

Kareena has said that she has always had space in her heart for you…

Bebo has always said that. She was my first heroine and she will always be special for me. She is not only a very sweet girl but also one of the finest actresses. We started our journey together. So she is always special to me.

So will you work with her?

Of course, I will. People keep saying that I refuse to work with her. The fact is that nothing worthwhile has come up.

Ayesha Shroff talks about her marriage, the link-ups and how she survived serious financial losses. She also confirms a rumour about her discovery, Katrina Kaif
By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 18, 2009)

Jackie  Shroff

•      Is your marriage with Jackie over?

Definitely not. Jackie and I are very much together. I met Jackie when I was 13. He is not very communicative.  At the end of the day, you have to see life through your kids. You don’t have to upset the balance. I know a lot of people have insinuated many things, but it’s not true.

•       Why did you part ways with Kaizad Gustad professionally? We hear he wants to get back with you.

That’s right, we have parted ways professionally. He will always be a friend, but I will not be working with him again. I need to be on the same page with the person I am working with.

•      You are now linked with your new business partner, Sahil Khan.

Sahil is only a few years older than my son, Tiger. The other day Tiger joked I am going to be arrested for pedophilia.

•      Was Boom a big mistake?

Unfortunately, it got pirated and the distributors backed out. They took the film but didn’t pay us. Thankfully, Manmohan Shetty and Ashok Hinduja stood by me. Shetty gave me a lot of time to pay my lab bills and Hinduja agreed to take his money after a long time. Jackie too stood by me.

•      And then?

After a point, Jackie told me that I was not a tough person and I needed to take it easy. So I lay low. I had to pay Rs 18 crores to Ashok Hinduja. We sold some of our assets.

•      Did all this affect your relationship with Jackie?

It was rough after Boom, but we planned how we were going to come out of this.

•      Is Jackie not good with money matters?

That’s wrong. He is a Gujarati and has an astute sense of money. The only thing is that he goes the extra mile to help a friend. If a filmmaker claims he has gone over budget, he will say, “Forget it. Don’t pay me.” When we were newly married and didn’t have a car, we would often walk back home from our outings and he would give a lot of money to the beggars.

•      After the bad experience, you are still planning to make another film?

I can’t allow failure to bog me down. Jackie had told me that I shouldn’t jeopardise our family money again. Now, you don’t have to use your personal funds. There are many corporates and financers to back you.

•      Is Jackie a better father than a husband?

Jackie is a better father, but he is a wonderful husband too.

•      Is Jackie strict with Krishna?

No sleep-overs at friend’s place. He will keep texting her to know where she is. Rules are different for Tiger. Krishna minds that but then Tiger reminds her of their three-year age difference.

•      You have sold your Sony shares?

Yes. We invested in Sony about 15 years ago. Many people told us that it was a crazy idea. It’s time to move on.

Ayesha Shroff

•      Why?

Initially, there were only few channels. Being in business in the nascent stages is always more thrilling. Now, we want to do something different. I have started a production company with Sahil Khan. Our first film, Rani, will go on the floors in January.

•      Is Kevin Spacey still involved with the film?

Actually we were thinking of casting him, but we changed the script.

•      You discovered Katrina Kaif. Is she still in touch with you?

Not really. We met at a party once and just greeted each other.

•      Did you change her surname?

She had an English surname, which was not easy to pronounce. She is not Katrina Kaif originally. She is Katrina Turquotte. We wanted to give her a surname which would be accepted by the Indian audience. First we thought of naming her Katrina Kazi, but then we thought Kazi would have a religious overtone. So we thought of Kaif.

•       But it is said that she has a Kashmiri father.

If that’s what she says, you have to believe her. Her name on her passport that time was Katrina Turquotte.

Sarita Tanwar (MID-DAY; July 31, 2009)

Saif Ali Khan walks in 10 minutes late. He’s looking fresh and surprisingly fit. He gives me a typical filmy hug and announces, “I haven’t had a bath yet.” I tell him that information would’ve been appreciated a few seconds earlier. Even though he is in his gym clothes, he’s not carrying his workout on him.

Must be the blue blood. He settles down on the other end of the couch and dons his serious glasses, “This is the Bengali in me finally coming out. Very Basu Bhattacharya.” Point noted and it’s time for some serious business. He orders coffee and me conversation. And then, we talk about his love, aaj and kal. Excerpts….

The last time you did a light romantic film (Hum Tum), you won a National Award. What are you expecting with Love Aaj Kal (LAK)?
I am not in the least interested in awards. It is a kind of celebration that comes much later. I am hoping for a decent opening and a successful run. That’s it.

That’s it?
I am hoping and expecting that people will like the movie and enough of them will watch it so that the people who have invested in us are not disappointed. I think it is a good movie and it has a good story. I think stories are really important parts of our lives, whether it is reading or watching them or listening to them from an old tailor in Bhopal, sitting at the foot of my bed, when I was a baby. My parents would be on the balcony, talking with adults and this old man would tell me tales of shikar and tigers and how it attacked somebody….

A man with stories! Can I steal him?
Yeah, no! He was about 90 then yaar…

Drat! Okay, hoping LAK does well for you as a producer, or as an actor?
Both. I think it’s more important that it does well. I am playing a Sikh character, and also a contemporary character called Jai, which people may or may not connect to, because of his thinking. There was a little bit of that in Salaam Namaste, where he didn’t want to get married just because she was pregnant, which people did not like as it isn’t the most heroic thing to do. Similarly, Jai doesn’t know that he loves this girl, and he certainly doesn’t believe in marriage and wants to be practical. But the story is how he changes from that into something else.

Sounds like you.
Err, maybe. Maybe, I suppose. But actually, not really. Jai seems quite clear that he doesn’t want to commit to anyone. Maybe I am just making him sound like me. But he’s not really so.

Most actors and filmmakers take trips to Shirdi, Vaishnodevi or Tirupati before their release. Have you done any of that?
(Sounds amused) No. but I believe Dino (co-producer Dinesh Vijan) went to Siddhi Vinayak with the print. I definitely believe in God. And I believe in luck. And I understand why people would want to cover all the bases. There is a big question mark as to what would work, so people try anything. I mean ultimately, when there is turbulence on the plane, and my gut clenches, I do start saying the Ayatul Kursi. Let’s not laugh at people who do these things but I would like to have the strength to say that mandir and prayer aside, there’s a whole lot of other stuff that is in the gray area.

Like numerology? Did you check if you title was ‘balanced’ for success?
No. I don’t believe that much in astrology and numerology even though I think it could be fun sometimes. I find some of these numerologically sound titles attractive. Like Himesh Reshammiya’s film, what was the name..?

Karzzzz?
(Grins) No, that was a bad marketing idea. Especially if the film is even slightly boring. Arre, it was his only film that ran. It was called Aap Kaa Surror The Real Love Story and it was spelled with two A’s and Kambakkht Ishq had two K’s and Singh Is Kinng had two N’s. So it is kind of hip. It has an edge to it.  But when people do it to their names that is not cool.

For a brief while, Kareena was Kariena…
Oh no! Really? I am happy she has changed it back.

So you will never be Saaif, with an extra A?
No chance. But for my films, maybe I would try it. Maybe Love Aaj Kal would have looked better as Love Aaj Kall. Maybe it would be funky.

Deepika is the youngest actress you’ve worked with and Kareena is the youngest girl you’ve been involved with. That’s new!
Yes, it is new. Definitely.

And?
(Smirks) And it makes you health conscious. Like on hand, I will say, “I think I should be much fitter and healthier.” And on the other, I am really happy being 38.

When you are with these 20-plus women, do you feel older, wiser and smarter or there is some connect?
Oh, I connect with them completely. Why it works is because I am quite juvenile and they are quite mature. (Laughs) So it balances out just fine. But seriously, I do feel very happy for the people I have met, the things I have seen, and experienced. I really think I have matured. I have had a really interesting history, even though I say it myself. So if you ask me, being with Kareena or working with someone younger than me, it is a non-issue for me. I really like being me. And I am very confident in that. I am so lucky that I am doing okay in movies also. Because it is another world.

You’ve never promoted a film like this before. Do you find it cumbersome?
(Sighs) Incredibly exhausting. If I see another camera…. (rolls his eyes).

…or a journalist?
No, I think there is a charm to the written word. We learnt early in our careers to speak carefully because the printed word reads differently because it doesn’t like a tone. It can be cold. So you must word yourself intelligently.

Like a text message.
But a personality can be sensed through an sms. I personally don’t like those short forms. I can’t say ‘pls’; I will type ‘please’ (dramatically). And I can’t bear ‘da’ for ‘the’.

Ok, coming back to promotions….
We sat here as a production house and said, ‘Let us make people aware of this film.’ Promotion is such an important part of the film for the producer. Otherwise as an actor, you do the film and then you call the producer and interfere, ‘Where is the hoarding?’, ‘Where is the poster?’.  Now I know that there are 450 million mobile users and 50 million internet users in India and I want to reach everyone. So you get involved in the whole process. It’s better than worrying about what another actor is doing. I see the poster of Kites and think it is phenomenal. I feel, “Wow, Hrithik Roshan is fit, and a good-looking guy. Like an angel sometimes.” It’s not competitive. I am like – let me work harder; let me learn from other people. I put all my energies into producing this movie rather than worrying about what other people are doing.

But you’ve never really worried about competition.
True. Earlier I wasn’t even worried about myself that much as well.

That’s the lazy Leo in you.
Possibly. And it’s also a bit like my father. At some level I don’t want to lose that. When you are successful, then suddenly people start waking up to you. That’s the scary part. I like to put my feet up on ottomans, in Jaipur razais and watch TV and just cut off from everything in the afternoon. But when you are super-successful, then suddenly everyone wants a piece of you. And then they get offended when some top notches of Mumbai society or politician wants to meet you… The challenge is to be successful and yet maintain a balance without offending anybody but keeping your equilibrium.

You’ve not shown the film to your colleagues as well as the media. Why?
I have known you for so long; I can easily call you and say I am having a trial, watch it and tell me what you think. But you are going to sense that my intention is to seduce you somehow into liking it. At the same time, when I have a press show, as a producer, I will invite people and come say a few words and then bugger off. I am not going to hang around till the end and ask people, “Kaise laga, kaise laga.” Because I will be too tense anyway. Even if my friend goes to see the film, forget the press or the industry, somewhere his opinion will start mattering. And I don’t want it to matter.

Won’t your colleagues be upset that you didn’t show them the film?
If you don’t show the film to anyone, then there is no stress. And it is important to be consistent in life. I have never had a trial. I have never called another actor or filmmaker and said, “I want to see your movie, organise a trial, yaar.” Because I think it is more fun to buy my popcorn and go to the theatre and watch the film. The bottom line of the psychology of the whole thing is: If you pay money to buy a ticket, and make a plan to go see it with your family, friends or girlfriend, it is a different psychology than to be invited by me. I am not interested in THAT audiences’ opinion. Someone will be too tense to laugh and the actors would be like, “I would’ve done this scene better.” The producers will say, “Arre, how much money have these guys spent?” The heroines will be, “This girl is rubbish; I am better than her.” So you know there is no barometer.

How do you react when people feel that you are still not established as a solo hero?
I don’t think that’s true. Who can say that now? You are digging out a question from 1992.

No, that is the perception.
What crap! That perception went out with Hum Tum, which was a solo hero film. Then Parineeta was a solo hero.

But you still did Race, with Anil and Akshaye.
Yeah, but if Race had been a flop, it would’ve been only my flop. Let’s get that clear. There are certainly performances that have contributed to the film but I had the most to lose.

Yeah, and even though Race did good business, it was never counted among the big hits. Why?
Dude, I don’t know about that, but as far as the distributors go, they were very happy. It was a 1200 print opening. They opened that film much wider than any other movie of mine.

Also, you didn’t get due credit for its success.
I got the due credit from Ramesh Taurani, who will be happy to pay me for Race 2 and that is the kind of due I am interested in. And the fact is that the audiences have seen the film, and loved it. About the internal politics, I am not really concerned as long as it doesn’t affect my job.

Looking back, do you feel it was a wrong decision to do so many two-hero projects?
No. I have also chosen what I thought were the best roles.

But you’ve even played second fiddle to Madhavan in Rehna Hain Terre Dil Mein.
Yeah but that was not a particularly great time for me. Like any actor, I’ve always chosen the best from what I was offered that year. Some years have not been very interesting, while some have been great. Your aspirations change according to your success ratio. In the beginning, you are just happy to be working. That you have a job, and you have been accepted. Your standards are pretty low. And pretty soon, after a while, you want to be the best there is. The best there has ever been (laughs); you know there is no end to that kind of ego shit.

You recently said you and Kareena didn’t plan to stay engaged forever. Does that mean you’re already engaged?
No. I mean I feel like I am engaged. But I don’t believe in engagements as such; they are a bit old-fashioned.

Your mom said in a recent interview that you both have the family’s blessings.
I am sure mom wants me to settle down. Parents like to tie up everything and they think it’s done. But it is not done even if you are married. Today, marriage is another form of engagement. It is a legal commitment that it is quite easy to get out of. It’s not like: It’s all over and now we can all go to sleep. And anyway it is very important in a girl’s career for her to focus on that. And marriage — let’s be honest — alters your image, your marketability and people lose interest in you. I’d much rather people kept asking, “When are you getting married?” The minute you are married, you are yesterday’s news. And I am not in any rush to get married. Because I am loving this.

Is it tough to manage being together with your tough schedules?
We are balancing our lives beautifully. We are working hard and Kareena is more than a wife, because she loves me. There are so many wives who don’t love their husbands because they are pakaoed after 10 years of being together. Bebo gives me all the time in the world. And when I get done with these two days and the film releases, I will give time. We manage. People laugh at us saying, “Oh you are turning up on the set; she is coming here” but that’s how we manage.

Oh, you are aware of people laughing?
Yeah, of course, but what to do? Initially when the relationship is starting, you want to make each other secure, and you want to tell the world that we are serious about each other. We are not a fly-by-night kind of a thing. So we make commitments on paper, and we say things but before you know it, it gets blown out of proportion.

What if Bebo says she wants marriage?
For an actor and for a working person, it must come at the right time. You must do it when you want to do it, or when you want to have children. We’ve waited for a reason. It is not the 1920s when it was like now we can live together or now we can spend time legally. We can do all that now, without that. People must understand her priorities. She is a film child. She has grown up watching films. She has always wanted this and she has finally achieved it. And I absolutely forbid her to even want to. Tomorrow if she says, “Let’s get married”, I will tell her, “I think you should work for a few years.”

She has been flaunting her ring for a long time.
She can flaunt many rings. I will give her lots of them. Even I wear rings.

What’s going on between you and Shahid? He was quoted saying that you and Bebo were using his name to get publicity.
I am really glad you asked me this because enough has been said now. Shahid seems like a really well brought-up guy and I mean no offence to him. And let’s stop it now. We are both gentlemen and whenever we have met, we’ve shook hands, and that’s it. So I will not listen to anything anybody says. And it sounds so fake to say I sincerely wish him all the best but I want him to know that I have only heard good things about him. And that too from his ex-girlfriend, which leaves me with a sense of respect for the past and God bless him. He seems like a strong man, and a good kid. That’s it.

There were reports that you were offered Kaminey?
I would like to clear once and for all that Vishal Bhardwaj did not offer me Kaminey. We talked about a film about twins. That film might not even have been Kaminey. I hope it is a good film. But right now, I am more interested in my film running. And I am not interested in other people’s downfall because it doesn’t help me in anyway. When Sanjay Dutt went to jail, it didn’t benefit anybody. It just hurt him. So tomorrow, if something happens to an actor, it does not increase your saleability.

All actors say they don’t watch other actors’ films. What about you?
I genuinely don’t watch many Hindi films. But when I do, l like to see what other people are doing and how they perform. Maybe not at a competitive level. Maybe I will learn from them.

Ever considered direction?
Not really. Not at the moment. It is a completely different kind of a ball-game. It is a huge commitment. I like to cut off and stop for a while. But a director is always thinking, writing, then making and then editing – it’s never ending. I think it is a single man’s job. I don’t know how they manage to be in relationships. Is that wrong to say? I think it’s like being a cop; then the girl really needs to understand.

Many would say that about an actor’s job too.
No, an actor can make time and say, “Ab pack up ho gaya and I can go home.”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Satish Kaushik is set to reveal some startling truths with Teree Sang, which deals with teenage pregnancy
By Indu Mirani (MUMBAI MIRROR; July 31, 2009)

On the sets of Teree Sang

•    You have been more known for melodrama. What made you take up an issue like teenage pregnancy in Teree Sang?

Every filmmaker needs a change. While surfing the net, I came across a website called standupgirl.com. where I read many stories about teenage pregnancies and the problems it can create. I realised that this subject could be dramatised very well.

•    What makes your film different from others on the subject?

In our society, this problem is suppressed a lot, our culture doesn’t allow us to speak too much about it. In our country, there are so many laws that we are unaware of. While making the film, I read that 95 per cent of children and 90 per cent of parents don’t know that there is a law called ‘Age of consent’.  Teree Sang will actually tell you that the age of consent is 16 and not 18 as most people believe. The law says that if consensual sex is practised before this age then, it is punishable. Ironically, nobody knows this.

•    It’s not 18?

No, the minimum age to marry is 18. There is some confusion because the ‘Age of consent’ law was made by the British and the ‘Age of Marriage’ was made by our traditional Republic of India. So, one can have pre-marital sex at the age of 16 but marriage can only happen after 18 years of age. In Manipur, the age of consent is 14 years and if the boy is ready to marry then it is 13 years. This is the first time that I am making a film that is so well researched. My story revolves around this girl who is 15 years of age, she enters into a sexual relationship and becomes pregnant. Now it is her decision to abort the child or keep it and she decides not to kill a life. Though she is very young, herself a baby in fact, she is what today’s teenager’s are, capable of taking her own decisions. The youth is no more what it used to be in our times, they are mature individuals.

•    Wouldn’t the film have more of an impact if you had taken known names instead of newcomers?

No, because this film required fresh, young actors. In my film the girl is 15 years old and the boy is 17 years old. If I would have taken a well established face, then his or her image would have overpowered the character. I needed a baby-face girl to carry a baby. So Sheena (Shahabadi) was the apt choice for it. She has a very sweet face. Ruslaan (Mumtaz), though technically not a newcomer since he has had a release, looked like the character of the boy.

•    Is there any other social cause that excites you, that you would like to make a film about?

Yes, it is about this dead man Lalbihari ‘Mritak’. It happens in UP, that to grab a part of your property, your relatives show you dead on paper. It a story of a man who applies for a loan and then comes to know that he is dead on paper. He is told that his uncles have proven him dead. He is surprised and tells the person that he is alive sitting in front of him. Isn’t he a bigger truth than the paper? Then it takes him 18 years to prove that he is alive. He loses his youth, his money, his relationships, his love but fighting for his identity makes him a man, a social worker and a lawyer. An illiterate like him becomes a known entity and he gains a lot of knowledge on many subjects. He thanks God that he faced all this because this is what made him alive. So, he ads ‘Mritak’ to his name which means dead.

It will be made in Hindi but I intend to take it international. I am in talks with some studios. I may even play the lead role; most people tell me I look exactly like a common man and so would be suitable for it. But, for me, it’s first Teree Sang.

Sharmila Tagore has asked Saif-Kareena to get married soon. But Kareena not keen to do so just yet
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; July 12, 2009)

Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor

Now that Saif is almost 40 (he’ll be 39 next month) Saif’s mother Sharmila Tagore, never known to interfere in her children’s lives, has expressed concern about Saif’s marriage. For the first time she has come out in the open expressing the wish to see Saif and Kareena married.

So far Sharmila has never commented on her son’s relationship, though it is no secret that Kareena is a favourite in the Khan household.

Says a source, “Both Sharmila and Mansoor Pataudi have taken to Kareena in a big way. They’ve never seen their son happier in any other relationship. And they know Kareena is the right girl for their son. They also know that Kareena gets along famously with Saif’s children. Now when Saif is on the threshold of 40, Sharmila has for the first time made a statement on her son’s private life.”

The marriage matter has now reached a stage where the ball is entirely in Kareena’s court.

Saif’s and Kareena’s mothers have met and expressed a mutual joy in the union. Kareena’s and Saif’s respective dads are all for the marriage too, though unlike the mothers, the two fathers have left the decision to the two people concerned.

But Kareena is not ready yet.

“I’ve to consolidate my career right now,” she says. “And I know I can perfectly balance out my marriage with my career. I’ve Saif’s mom’s example in front of me. She did all her best films after marriage. More recently Aishwarya Rai Bachchan too has stuck a perfect balance between home and studio.”

Sharmila Tagore

For Kareena it’s not that simple. “I know once I get married I’d like to devote myself completely to that. When it comes to my emotions I’m not a multi-tasker. So at the moment, specially after Kambakkht Ishq, I need to work. These are the best years of my working life. And Saif is with me, neither of us are running away from a full commitment to one another. So no marriage for another three years.”

Apparently after Sharmila Tagore’s uncharacteristic comments on her son’s marriage, Kareena was put in a quandary as neither Saif nor she could ever say no her.

However Kareena has convinced Saif once again that marriage must wait.

Says Saif, “Amma loves Kareena and of course wants us to be together always. But we both need and want to focus on our work and we’ll think of taking our relationship to the next level when the time is right. Right now, things are beautiful the way they are.”