Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘newspaper

By Taran Adarsh, January 1, 2010 – 12:30 IST

What do you do when you, accidentally, bang into someone on the road? Flee from the spot? Call for help? Dial the cops? Rush the victim to the hospital?

Pick up a newspaper and chances are you might glance upon a hit-and-run case only too often. ACCIDENT ON HILL ROAD, a remake of STUCK [Mena Suvari, Stephen Rea], raises a few questions in its own way. Perhaps, the intentions were right, but what eventually unfolds on screen isn’t.

The problem with ACCIDENT ON HILL ROAD is that it loses focus after a point and that takes away the seriousness from the issue.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Sonam [Celina Jaitly] is a nurse who accidentally steers her car into the harmless Prakash [Farooque Shaikh], sending him flying through the windshield. Not wanting to jeopardize her future, Sonam, along with her drug-peddling boyfriend Sid [Abhimanyu Singh], chooses not to get him medical help, leaving him clinging to life in her garage.

But soon her psyche begins to unravel as the captor and captive are pitted against each other in a battle for survival.

ACCIDENT ON HILL ROAD had the potential to be a thought-provoking film that pricks your conscience, but what comes across is a half-baked attempt that runs out of steam soon after the intermission. In fact, the film begins quite well and a few moments as well as the twists and turns in the first half do keep you on the edge.

But the writing [screenplay adapted by Mahesh Nair and Siddharth Parmar] is shoddy in the second part and does not yield the desired outcome. The sequences prior to the climax are a complete downer, while the climax is the worst part of the film. The drama fails to become the nail-biting one that it ought to be.

Also, the assorted people that flit in and out of the story [the kid and his mom, the cabbie and the nosey neighbour with a dog] are half-baked characters as well. Pray, why were they included in the first place?

Mahesh Nair’s direction is a shade better than the poor and sketchy script. Also, he is unable to involve the audience in the drama. Ravi Walia’s cinematography is ordinary. The film has just one song [music: Raju Singh] – ‘Nasha Nasha’ – which is quite erotic.

Farooque Shaikh doesn’t get any scope, frankly. One definitely expected more, since the veteran returns to the big screen after a hiatus. Abhimanyu Singh enacts his part well. But it is Celina Jaitly who pitches in a commendable act and catches you by complete surprise.

On the whole, ACCIDENT ON HILL ROAD will fail to make any headway.

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Nikhil Advani will hold a nation-wide contest to choose a teenager, who will play the 17-year-old Akshay Kumar in Patiala House
By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 17, 2009)


Akshay Kumar

Although Nikhil Advani’s Patiala House is set to go on the floors next month, his casting troubles are far from over.

After roping in Akshay Kumar and Anushka Sharma for the lead roles, Nikhil is now looking for a youngster who will play the 17 year-old Akshay Kumar.

Our source said, “The film’s team was tired of auditioning and watching show reels. None of the boys fulfilled the requirements. So, Akshay suggested that they conduct a nation-wide hunt. The participants essentially have to match Akshay’s height and body language.”

The contest will begin from December 1. The advertisements announcing the same will be published in newspapers across India. Moreover, the filmmakers have tied up with two news channels, one entertainment channel and a multiplex chain for the contest. The entries will be collected from December 1 to December 15. Director Nikhil Advani, will select ten semi-finalists. The winner will then be chosen by Akshay Kumar.

Talking about Akshay’s determination, Nikhil said, “Akshay is very keen on casting someone who comes from a real background. At 17, Akshay was a typical middle class boy; he wants some of his qualities to show in the boy who will play him in the film.”

Patiala House will be produced by Bhushan Kumar and Mukesh Talreja. The film will be running on a tight schedule as it has already been slotted for a 2010 Diwali release.

By Taran Adarsh, September 4, 2009 – 11:31 IST

Browse a newspaper or surf news channels and I am sure, you’d be enlightened with more than a hundred stories in the course of a day. But not all stories have the potential to be adapted for the big screen. MOHANDAS suffers due to this reason.

MOHANDAS is a poignant tale and is well shot too, no doubt, but the question is, does it hold your attention for the next 2 hours? In parts, yes, not in totality. At best, MOHANDAS might strike a chord in the film festival circuit, that’s it! Catering to a really miniscule audience.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Meghna [Sonali Kulkarni], a correspondent working at a news channel in New Delhi, receives a videotape from a remote place in Madhya Pradesh. On the tape, a battered young man claims to be the real Mohandas [Nakul Vaid] and alleges that someone else has stolen his identity. Someone else is living as ‘Mohandas’.

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Intrigued by what looks like an unusual small-town scam, Meghna makes a trip to that place. There, she unearths the true story. Mohandas is a topper in studies and is overjoyed when he is selected for a job in Oriental Coal Mines. But he is kept waiting and waiting to actually get the job. Long afterwards, when he has given up and reconciled to it, he learns that someone else has assumed his name and has already taken his job. When he rushes to protest, he is beaten up and thrown out.

Meghna places this story in the media. Harshvardhan [Aditya Srivastava], a lawyer from the district, takes this case of stolen identity to court with the intention of hauling up the usurper. But will things change?

In most cases, the choice of the subject is right, but the director makes mincemeat of it. But in this case, debutante director Mazhar Kamran makes a sincere attempt to narrate this unconventional story well. A number of sequences are truly well executed, especially the end, which comes as a shocker.

But, at the same time, Mazhar should’ve restricted the narrative to 1.30 hours, instead of almost 2 hours. Also, after a point, it becomes one of those films that depict the good in good light and the corrupt in bad light. In short, it gets bland and monotonous!

Nakul Vaid plays his part very well. Sushant Singh doesn’t get scope, but nonetheless leaves an impact. Sharbani Mukerji has transformed herself well for this part. Sonali Kulkarni gets her role right. Aditya Srivastava, as always, is competent. Govind Namdeo is first-rate. Sameer Dharmadhikari gets no scope. Uttam Haldar is proficient.

On the whole, MOHANDAS is a well-intentioned, well-made film, but it will have a tough time standing on its feet due to lack of face-value and also multiple releases.

Rating:[critique]