Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘Oye Lucky Lucky Oye

Abhay Deol to learn Tamil for Dibakar Banerjee’s next film

By Sonal Chawla (MUMBAI MIRROR; December 24, 2009)


After Oye Lucky, Lucky Oye (2008), the successful combination of director Dibakar Banerjee and Abhay Deol will be seen again. The untitled film is a political thriller involving an assassination. Abhay will play one of the protagonists.

Confirming the news, Dibakar says, “The film is based on a European novel published in the mid-1960s. We are still negotiating for the rights of the book. Ever since I read the book, I wanted to convert it into a film. Of course, I will adapt it to Indian sensibilities. The film deals with three principal characters. Abhay plays a South Indian judge, while the other characters are a journalist who sells soft porn to magazines and an expat social worker, who will be female.”

Abhay Deol Dibakar Banerjee

Currently Dibakar is talking to a few heroines who will star with Abhay. He says, “I need one girl. She will be finalised in the next few days. But the biggest challenge in this film is that Abhay Deol will have to learn Tamil. He plays a Tamilian and has to speak several lines in Tamil throughout the film. For that, he will be first learning the language,” Dibakar added.

The director will take a short break after the release of Love, Sex Aur Dhoka (LSD). He adds, “This movie has completely drained me emotionally and I need to give sometime to myself.  The script is already written and ready and will only go on floors by the end of next year. Unconventional subjects are my forte, but this film will not be bolder than LSD. Trust me, you will not have seen a bolder film than LSD in your life.”

Is this a Balaji production roo? That’s the buzz, we told him. He says, “There are no producers as such on board yet.”

Dibakar Banerjee gets voyeuristic in his next film

PRIYA SUGATHAN Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; December 17, 2009)

With the super success of Khosla Ka Ghosla and Oye Lucky, Lucky Oye, Dibakar Banerjee has come to be the new-age Hrishikesh Mukherjee and Basu Chaterjee rolled in one. While his third film Love Sex Aur Dhoka (LSD) continues to remain urban-centric and small-budget, it is going to be a radically different experience than its predecessors.

“The word ‘sex’ adds to the allure of the film. Why do we make so much out of this three-letter-word? When it’s accepted that it’s as basic a need as eating food, everyone indulges in it, and yet there’s a taboo to it. It also forms a major part of voyeurism, which is the premise of the film. We have turned voyeuristic in recent times. We want to know what’s happening behind closed doors, or catch a celeb with his pants down. It’s a streak that’s spilling over in our relationships, in our entertainment and the news. Even our ideas on love or sex are not our own, but borrowed from what’s seen on screen,” says Dibakar as he explains the subject of his film.

LSD will be India’s first digital film. “The Hindi filmgoer is going to be stunned. The film could only be shot on a digital format. In this age of online videos, Youtube, MMS, it’s time we explored these mediums to tell our stories. The format has its own grammar. I had to unlearn all my filmi gyan. It was my ground zero. I shot the film using cameras that were smaller than a lipstick, from inside a purse and also used infra red lights that are mostly used by soldiers in the night during war. It was necessary as the ‘camera’ plays the important character in my film,” explains the director.

Another first for Dibakar is his collaboration with Ekta Kapoor. “No one understands entertainment the way Ekta does. The one thing that I look for in my producers is how excited they get with the idea. Ekta understood that she was looking at a new way of filmmaking that would rewrite the rules in the Indian film industry. She not only liked the unique treatment of the film, but also its universal story of love, sex and betrayal,” reveals Dibakar, whose ‘peep show’ is set to release in early 2010 with complete newcomers in the cast. A 10-minute screener was shown to international delegates and film festival conveners at the Goa Film Bazaar and the response was exhilarating.

LOOKING AHEAD: Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor in the film
Karan Johar is unperturbed by mixed reactions to his recent film

MEENA IYER Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; November 28, 2009)

Dharma Productions’ Kurbaan with Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor in the lead definitely got people across the globe to sit up and take notice of it. Rensil D’Silva’s cross-genre flick that is a love story set against the backdrop of terrorism came in for a mixed view from its audience. However, Karan Johar is not shaken. “I know exactly what I’m doing,” says Bollywood’s prolific and progressive producer. He admits that his banner has in the past been associated with candy floss cinema. But from the start of 2009, Dharma is emerging as a formidable force, and has been making dramatic departures from its safe zone. Says Karan, “With Kurbaan, we did make a complete departure from what we have earlier been doing. Whether it was Dostana or Wake Up Sid, we’ve been dabbling in different genres.” He says that even those films were closer in texture to what he has been doing in the past — like a Kabhie Khushie Kabhi Gham or a Kal Ho Na Ho. “But,” adds Karan, “in the case of Kurbaan, we moved away completely to address a serious issue. And, when we did that, we were well aware that we were treading on a new path. Reactions to the film may be mixed. However, it is my endeavour to raise the bar with each film that I undertake. And, to also make globally relevant cinema.” Of the firm view that the West is watching not only our economic progress but also taking interest in our cinema, Karan feels that, “Sometimes such cinema may not exactly get the box office that one hopes for, but that certainly doesn’t shake my faith in this genre of film.” KJo also feels that the synergy between him and UTV Movies with whom he associated for Wake Up Sid and Kurbaan is truly gratifying in that both production houses are invading a similar cinema space. And have a similar thought process. “UTV produced some of the most amazing films in the last couple of years,” says Karan. “From a Mumbai Meri Jaan, Aamir, A Wednesday, Jodhaa Akbar, Wake Up Sid, Oye Lucky Lucky Oye and now Kurbaan — it has consistently backed progressive and meaningful cinema.” And while he will delve into relevant issues like terrorism and autism next (in My Name Is Khan), Karan will keep up the quintessential date movie like I Hate Luv Stories, a fun caper like Dostana-2 and the remake of the Hollywood flick Step Mom. No matter what, Dharma is a banner on a mission. They will never veer away from good cinematic content — be it realistic or pure fantasy. meena.iyer@timesgroup.com

NO WORRIES: Abhay Deol
Abhay Deol, who is busy wrapping up Aisha, clears the air

MEENA IYER (BOMBAY TIMES; November 22, 2009)

Abhay Deol is currently one of Bollywood’s hottest properties. The actor who has been on a roll since Anurag Kashyap’s Dev D and Dibakar Banerjee’s Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye got those rave reviews, is once again in news courtesy Dev Benegal’s The Road Movie, a film that has taken the international film festival circuit before it comes to Indian shores. As the leading man of the film, Abhay has been jet-hopping from Toronto to Venice, New Delhi to Doha. On a day when he can actually catch his breath for a few minutes, the actor says, “I’ve bought myself a new office in Mumbai. My banner is all set to roll with our first production in the month of January 2010. My director Navdeep Singh and I are just finalising details before we go on set.”


He has an achiever. In the first leg of his journey, the young actor has gone from struggling actor to being the toast of the international film circuit; and in the second leg he has gone from being Bollywood hottie to independent film producer. Yup, in about a year, life has thrown up a myriad of opportunities for this contemporary thinking actor. But there has also been his share of controversy. Reports said he was unhappy with the treatment meted out to him on the sets of Sonam Kapoor’s home production Aisha. It is conjectured that Abhay was cooling his heels on the sets of the film in Delhi because things were haphazard.

However Abhay refuses to be drawn into a controversy. Says he, “My producer should be clearing the air on any controversy surrounding Aisha. As a professional actor I will never talk about what happened on set. I hold Sonam (co-star and part producer) in highest regard. And, there is no ego issue with her.”

Abhay is also expected to start work with Farhan Akhtar and Ritesh Sidhwani’s banner and he is said to be in talks with producer Krishna Shah for the film on Indira Gandhi. Of course, the actor’s silent on these films too. “My producers will make the announcements as and when they have to,” he says. “All I can say is that I’m exhilarated with the work I’m doing.”
A WINNER ALREADY: A still from the film
… and this time, it’s a Marathi film that’s taking India global

TIMES NEWS NETWORK (BOMBAY TIMES; October 22, 2009)


Marathi writer-director Paresh Mokashi, is one happy man. And why not, his debut film, Harishchandrachi Factory
is India’s official selection for the 82nd Academy Awards. It’s an honour of course, for which Paresh has UTV, Paprika Media and Mayasabha Productions to thank for. UTV whose Rang De Basanti got nominated for the BAFTAs and Taare Zameen Par for the Oscars, will see that this film too, gains global recognition. They have kicked off an aggressive campaign, will target the international media and have extensive screenings in Los Angeles in October and November.

Siddharth Roy Kapur, CEO of UTV Motion Pictures, said, “The Academy recognises films with unusual themes. A little over 90 minutes, HCF has the ability to reach out to international audiences in a grammar of film-making they are conversant with.”


His thoughts are echoed by Vikas Bahl, Chief Creative Officer, UTV Motion Pictures. “We are proud to be bringing worldwide audience a film that tells the story of the birth of film-making in India — the world’s most prolific film producing nation,” he said.


Paresh, who through HCF presented the incredible journey of Dadasaheb Phalke to make India’s very first motion picture,

Raja Harishchandra, said, “What better than to have
one’s debut film about the making of India’s debut film! My search for the subject of my film was over when I first read the adventures of Dadasaheb Phalke. Selection to the Oscars is a very sweet surprise and now I’m hoping for the best.”


According to Smiti Kanodia, Founder & Chairperson of Paprika Media Pvt. Ltd., they were gung-ho about co-producing the film after hearing Paresh’s narration. “It captures the essence of Dadasaheb’s character and showcases fine performances by the actors, music composer and those behind the camera.”


No one in recent years has won more awards than UTV — from Rang De Basanti to Jodhaa Akbar, from Fashion
to Life in a Metro, from Khosla ka Ghosla to A Wednesday, from Mumbai Meri Jaan to Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye! and from Welcome to Sajjanpur to Dev. D. And now, they have yet another winner on their hands.

utv

TIMES NEWS NETWORK (BOMBAY TIMES; August 17, 2009)


Reaching out to a global audience with critically acclaimed box office hits, seems to be UTV Motion Pictures’ strategy. And how does Ronnie Screwvala’s production house do this? By making its presence felt at the most prestigious film festivals in the world, from Italy to Shanghai and New York to Moscow. Also Venice, where Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra’s Delhi 6 and Anurag Kashyap’s Dev. D will be screened at the 66th Venice International Film Festival next month in the ‘Out Of Competition’ section; and Toronto, where Ashutosh Gowariker’s forthcoming What’s Your Raashee? will premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 19. The romantic comedy’s stars, Priyanka Chopra and Harman Baweja, will attend this show along with producers Ronnie and Sunita A and Gowariker himself.


Siddharth Roy Kapur, CEO, UTV Motion Pictures, said, “It is indisputably
acknowledged as the artistic pinnacle for a film to be screened at Venice and Toronto — two of the most acclaimed film festivals. Receiving a platform there for three of our films is a rare honour.” Gowariker added, “We are very fortunate What’s Your Raashee? will be premiered at Toronto where, I believe, 64 countries are showcasing films before an audience of 300,000. I’m looking forward to getting the first international reactions to my romantic comedy with 13 songs!” While Rakeysh said of Delhi 6, “The new version of the film has done the trick. Being invited for screening at Venice is the first sign towards the acceptance of this version. The organisers are interested in screening it more than just once, which is very encouraging.”


New markets for UTV include Taiwan and Italy, where its films Jodhaa Akbar, A
Wednesday! Welcome to Sajjanpur, Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye! and Mumbai Meri Jaan have proudly been doing the rounds of the festival circuit. Welcome to Sajjanpur, in particular, was screened at the Taormina Film Festival in Sicily, and will next be shown at the Indo-American Arts Council’s MIAAC Film Festival in New York, the Fukuoka International Film Festival in Japan and the Indian Ocean Film Festival at Reunion Islands. While A Wednesday! was selected for the Shanghai International Film Festival in the Competition section for the ‘Asian New Talent Award’ and for the Bollywood & Beyond Indian Film Festival in Stuttgart, along with Mumbai Meri Jaan.


Two UTV films of 2008 that have proved to be big

draws internationally are Fashion and Jodhaa Akbar. Fashion, for which Priyanka Chopra swept many awards, was screened at the Moscow International Film Festival and the Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival (PIFFF) in South Korea; it has also been invited to the Kaohsiung Film Festival in Taiwan this October. While Jodhaa Akbar made the Barcelona Asia Film Festival in Spain as part of the Official selection and the Shanghai International Film Festival in the Panorama section. The Hrithik-Aishwarya starrer has also been invited to the Helsinki International Film Festival in September. And along with A Wednesday! and Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!, it was screened as part of a special exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York with Naseeruddin Shah and Abhay Deol introducing their respective films. Kashyap, the director of Dev. D, said, “UTV is making films that have real international potential in terms of content and not just face value. Their films are changing the world’s perception of Indian cinema.”

Ekta Kapoor
NO SEX PLEASE…in film titles that is. Evidently, censorship begins at the title stage. AMPTPP will not register a title with the word ‘sex’ in it

KUNAL M SHAH (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 17, 2009)



Given that Hindi films have a generous dash of pelvic thrusts, French kissing and hot lovemaking scenes these days, this is one of the most incongruous things to have happened in the film industry in recent times. Ekta Kapoor and director Dibakar Banerjee were in for a rude shock when the title they wanted for their next film was rejected by the Association of Motion Pictures and TV Programme Producers. The association rejected the two shortlisted titles Love Sex Aur Dhokha and Pyaar Sex Aur Dhokha saying that the titles are obscene. And here we thought birds kissing and flowers gently dashing against each other are a thing of the past.


A source said, “Both Ekta
and Dibakar are extremely dejected. Dibakar always stresses on having apt titles for his films. For instance, his earlier two films were titled Khosla Ka Ghosla and Oye Lucky Lucky Oye. They were shocked on receiving the reject letter from the association. They tried to reason it out but it was a futile attempt. Now they have no option but to look for an alternative title.”


Ekta Kapoor confirmed the story but didn’t divulge any more details. Dibakar Banerjee said, “We wanted to register the title Love Sex Aur Dhokha. The word pyaar could have been used in place of the
word love. We had submitted the title to check if it was available. However, the association rejected the title saying that it is too obscene. We contacted them to ask why they thought that our title is obscene. They have heard our argument and the matter is subjudice so I can’t give you any details. They are going to give us their reason soon.”


Commenting on the title’s importance, Dibakar said, “This title was extremely important to us and as it suggests everything, which will be depicted on screen. The title explains the entire script and the way the film
will be treated. All I can say is that it’s a film within a film and is like a window looking into the lives of the characters.”


Ratan Jain, President AMPTPP, remained unavailable for comment.