Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘saathiya

Vivek Oberoi on love, life and a fresh innings in Bollywood

By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 27, 2009)


• You have got some good reviews for your role in Kurbaan.

Yes. I have not stopped smiling since the film’s release. At one of the trials, Bebo (Kareena Kapoor) and Saif (Ali Khan) did tell me that I was good in the film. Then Karan (Johar) and Rensil (D’Silva)also told me the same thing. I had not seen the film till then as I was shooting in Hyderabad. It was a nice feeling when Karan told me ‘finally you make me proud.’ I saw the film just a day before its release and I had knots in my stomach. I was very nervous but I was with people who have always been kind to me. There were Shah Rukh and Gauri, Imran and his fiancée Avantika, Yash uncle, Davidji (Dhawan). They all hugged me and said I was good.

• Why have you not done a romantic film after Saathiya?

Honestly, I really don’t know. Kurbaan has got a romantic track but Mission Istanbul and Shootout At Lokhandwala had zero romance. I have not done an out-and-out romantic film and I am really looking forward to doing one.

• People are saying that you have changed and that you want to leave the controversies behind and concentrate only on your work.

I wanted this for a really long time. However, after Shootout… things did not fall in place. Almost four years ago, when I did Omkara, I saw Saif getting under the skin of the character Langda Tyagi. I loved the work ethics. That’s when I thought that I should stop doing what I was doing, but I had a backlog to finish. Then my close friend Amit Chandra sat me down and helped me streamline my life so that I could practically achieve what I was trying to. Now, I have learnt not to take anything for granted.

• How did Ramu and you patch up?

I don’t think patch up is the right word as we were never at loggerheads. I will never have the audacity to say anything against Ramu and as an artiste, I will always be indebted to him for giving me Company. But when he called me and told me ‘I will never work with you again’, I was shocked. Now, when he called me and said that he had something for me, I was so happy. When I met him, he said that he could see the same passion in my eyes again and gave me Rakta Charitra. I felt exactly the same on the first day of Rakta Charitra that I felt on the first day on the sets of Company. Ramu made me feel so comfortable.

• You have done some amazing stunts in Prince, something which you are not known for.

Yes. Kookie Gulati is quite a whiz kid. I did so many things that I cannot possibly explain — right from learning how to skateboard, doing parkour, learning cable work, to action training. I had to put so many things into my system that after the training session, things became easier.

• You have said that you are done with apologising to people.

I made a mistake and it is human to make mistakes. Personally, I think it’s humbling and it’s also building character to stand up and say I made a mistake and please forgive me. It is always an ego-based thing to say that why should I apologise. It is a real man who can say ‘I am sorry’ and that too in public. I have said sorry to the assistant director whom I was rude to, I have said sorry to the movie star whom I had a fight with and I even said sorry to the director I snapped at.

Two prominent Bollywood filmmakers — Manmohan Shetty and Bobby Bedi — have spoken against multiplexes and the high price of tickets, saying these two factors could destroy the industry.

Multiplexes killing Bollywood, say filmmakers

“The main culprit to bring down Bollywood are multiplexes,” said Shetty, who started the trend of multiplex cinema chains.

“The tickets are priced so high that people who used to watch the movies by paying Rs.30 to Rs.40 are not coming to cinema halls anymore,” Shetty said at a conference, ‘India – The Big Picture’, organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).

“With high budgets and high priced tickets at multiplexes, film business has become difficult,” he added.

Shetty, who produced movies like ‘GangaaJal’, also said the fees charged by stars have made movie production a tricky business.

“Even though film producers spend Rs.10-15 crore on promotion of films, it is difficult to recover the amount,” he said, adding that a star like Akshay Kumar, who earlier used to charge Rs.1 crore now commands Rs.25 crore.

Film producer Bobby Bedi, in his address at the same conference that was organised on the occasion of the 40th edition of the International Film Festival of India, equated high priced tickets to the Frankenstein monster that would soon “eat us all up”.

“By pricing the tickets high, the industry has created a monster which will eat us all up like Frankenstein,” said Bedi, whose Kaleidoscope Entertainment has produced blockbusters like ‘Saathiya’, ‘Maqbool’ and ‘Bandit Queen’.

“The need today is for us to lower the ticket prices and the cost of production,” he added.

“We shout from the rooftop about making 1,000 films in India every year. But only 84 films out of the 400 films are hits. What happens to the rest of the films and the money invested in them,” he asked.

Bedi also blamed the entry of corporate sector into film business for the unprecedented upswing in production costs and skyrocketing fees of stars.

“For ‘Mangal Pandey’, Aamir Khan was paid a princely sum of Rs.4 crore. In five years, the price could have a zero added to it,” he said.

“Corporates came into the film industry with pots of money. Now that they have made losses, they are exiting the market. Today, corporates are bleeding from the wounds they themselves inflicted.”

Source: IANS

In a rare display of guru-shishya bonding, Shaad Ali devotes himself to Mani Ratnam’s film; he is efficient assistant, nursemaid and mediator on the sets

By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; September 24, 2009)

In Mani Ratnam’s Raavana, Govinda plays Hanuman, while Vikram, the star from the south, plays Ram. Off camera, a heart-warming relationship between the guru and shishya is playing out on the sets. Even the crew equates Shaad to the devoted Hanuman, while his reverence for Mani Ratnam has put the latter on a pedestal as Ram.

Mani could not have wished for a better assistant than Shaad Ali. After directing films like Saathiya, Bunty aur Babli and Jhoom Barabar Jhoom, Shaad should ideally be concentrating on getting his next (with Yash Raj Films) off the ground. Instead, he prioritised his mentor Mani Ratnam’s film and rushed to the south to assist him.

Shaad’s involvement goes deeper than the professional commitment. He also plays Mani’s nursemaid and right-hand man. He ferociously guards the senior director from potential problems, tends to his dietary needs and keeps a paternal eye on his guru’s health.

Shaad Ali

Mani Ratnam

When Mani was hospitalised for his heart problem, Shaad was at his bedside constantly. He played a significant role in nursing the senior director back to health. His dogged devotion extends to monitoring Mani’s meals to keep the unhealthy stuff at bay. He fusses over his dietary dos and don’ts and nothing can get past his watchful eye, as he inspects the dabbas daily.

Shaad is up at the crack of dawn for a 6am shoot. At 5am, he makes sure that everything is in order and flawless to give his guru minimum reason to stress when he arrives at 5.45am. Even on the sets, everything is chalked out, so Mani doesn’t have to exert himself physically.

The assistant is also the good cop to Mani’s bad cop. Mani has the reputation of being quite the taskmaster, and the stars dare not voice their objections to the tough orders. Shaad plays the mediator and irons out any disputes brewing on the sets, often leading the problems to amicable solutions.

Even though stars return to Mumbai at the end of schedules, Shaad stays put by his guru’s side and intends to park himself there through post-production and till the film releases. As far as his YRF film is concerned, it was supposed to take off early next year. Mani’s health has delayed that project. An unperturbed Shaad has informed Aditya Chopra to push back the plans as well. Shaad’s new film has three heroes and three heroines, newcomers in all probability. He will not move on to his ambitious project with YRF, until his guru’s film releases in cinemas.

Shaad Ali has given new meaning to the phrase, ‘Work is worship.’

dbh

WHAT’S YOUR CHOICE-WANTED OR ‘DIL BOLE HADIPPA!’?

After a very disastrous dry period, here comes the biggest season of biggies ever! From tomorrow till the last week of December 2009, we are going to get at least one biggie every Friday and some Fridays are going to be  clogged with 3-4 big films. The season will start with two fresh and interesting films, Wanted and ‘Dil Bole Hadippa!’ (DBH).

Let’s talk about DBH first. This Rani Mukherjee starrer somehow reminds me of Rani’s Laaga Chunari Mein Daag which was similarly released during Ramzan Id in 2007 just like DBH. What’s more, both the movies are of Yash Raj Films! DBH is a very important film for Rani who off late has given a spate of flops. DBH is the best chance to prove that she’s still the best. If this film flopped, she may have to bid goodbye to films forever. Coincidentally, Rani was at a similar juncture during the release of Saathiya. She had given a lot of flops in a row and she had pinned all her hopes on Saathiya. In fact she was determined that if Saathiya doesn’t work, she’ll quit acting. Fortunately, Saathiya clicked big time with the audiences and Rani was appreciated by everyone for her performance. Fast forward to present-the situation is just the same!

What really impressed me about DBH is its marketing strategy. When the shooting of the film began, no one got a hint about Shahid’s presence in the film. The stills of the film that were released more than a year back featured only Rani. But it was during Diwali last year that pictures of Shahid Kapoor and Rani were released which revealed that Shahid also stars in the film! This was a shock for many-after all, who would have imagined Shahid and Rani as a Jodi? But the news of this unusual pairing really made many curious about this film. People who were earlier denouncing this film as ‘yet another flop of YRF’ began to view this film differently in Shahid’s presence.

If the film turns out well and gets good reports, there’s no stopping it. The promos have impressed many and the songs have also become a rage. The film is bound to take a good opening, even though it has a strong competition (Wanted). However, there is a possibility that the film may turn out to be damp squib if Director Anurag Singh failed to handle Rani’s double act well. But the fact that the film is so crucial for Rani and that Shahid is also a part of the film gives an indication that the film may turn out to be good! Let’s hope so!

Wanted

And regarding Wanted, I am somehow more excited about it than DBH! A remake of a Tamil superhit Pokkiri (which starred Asin), Wanted seems like a dhamakedaar entertainer. I happened to read some portions of Pokkiri’s story on Wikipedia and it gave me a strong gut feeling that Wanted may really turn out to be a great film. Salman’s popularity will once again soar if the film works, considering that Salman is the solo actor in the film. However, what can go against the film is its ‘A’ certificate. I was shocked big time when I learnt about this. What was also shocking is that producer Boney Kapoor accepted the adult certification, knowing that it may prevent Wanted from becoming a blockbuster. Again, let’s hope for the best!

Two mast films are releasing tomorrow. Do let me know which film interests you more!
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LAMHAA PROMO ROCKS!

lamhaa

Finally, the promo of my most awaited film of 2009, Lamhaa is out! Directed by National Award winner Rahul Dholakia (of Parzania fame) and starring Sanjay Dutt, Bipasha Basu and Kunal Kapoor, Lamhaa promises to show the real Kashmir which is never been told in any film till date. The film is also shot in places where no film has even been shot such as Srinagar’s Jamia Masjid. The promo of the film lives upto my expectations and it seems it may turn out be a very impactful film. Check out the promo HERE…dont miss!

Rani Mukerji is keen to star in films outside the YRF banner. She has been reading other scripts but is in no hurry to sign films only to prove a point
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; September 02, 2009)
Rani Mukerji is fed up of the vicious attempts by people within the industry who insist on labelling her as the exclusive leading lady of Yash Raj Films. According to Rani, some jealous actresses are spreading the rumours. Meanwhile, Rani’s friends say that contrary to rumours that she is just not interested in signing films outside the Yash Raj banner, she has been reading scripts by other banners but is in no hurry to sign films just to prove a point.

Rani Mukerji

She was heard telling a friend, “I won’t do anything just because it’s expected of me. My heart has to be in it.”

Rani now finds herself in the same position she was during Saathiya in 2002. One of her friends said, “At that time, Rani had only one project, which was Yash Raj’s Saathiya. She had told friends that if it didn’t work, she would quit films. Fortunately, Saathiya was a big hit and proved to be a turning point in her career. Now again, Rani has only one film on hand, Dil Bole Hadippa, which again is a Yash Raj film.”

For Dil Bole Hadippa, she has ensured that her talent and beauty are showcased better than ever before.Presumably inspired by Andy Fickman’s 2006 football flick She’s the Man where a girl disguised herself as a man to enter an all-male soccer team, Dil Bole Hadippa is also about cross-dressing.

Her friend added, “Rani decided to work round-the-clock on her figure so that she could do the sizzling dance numbers with Shahid. She also spent hours with her chreographer-friend Vaibhavi Merchant so that she could deftly match steps with Shahid.”

SK2 REMAKES OF SOUTH FILMS FAIL IN BOLLYWOOD!

The previous two Fridays saw the release of two biggies-Kambakkht Ishq on July 3 and Short Kut on July 10. What was common in both the films apart from the fact that both were comic entertainers was these 2 films were remakes of Southern films. While Kambakkht Ishq was a remake of the 2002 Kamal Hasan’s hit Tamil film, Pammal K Sambandam, Short Kut was a remake of a Roshan AndrewsMalayalam movie Udayananu Tharam. Don’t mistake it for a copy-the rights of both the films were acquired by the producers before remaking it.

Both these South films were big hits but surprisingly, their remakes have failed to impress the audiences. Short Kut took a bad opening and the collections didn’t improve in the weekend due to so many negative reports. Kambakkht Ishq (KI), on the other hand, did a great job in the weekend but the negative reviews prevented it from becoming a big hit. Some trade pundits are trying to save the film by mentioning that KI took a bigger opening than Singh Is Kinng and was at par at Ghajini. In its 1st week, Ghajini collected 64.41 crores and Singh Is Kinng made 39.72 crores. KI, on the other hand, manage to collect 33.42 crores (acc to boxofficeindia.com)! Figures speak for themselves! And the film has fallen greatly in the 2nd week and it’s difficult to say if it’ll recover its costs.

Coming back, Bollywood has since a long time got inspired from Southern films and churned out successful films. One of the biggest hits of 2002, Saathiya, was originally a Tamil film, Alai Payuthey, directed by Mani Ratnam. The Hindi remake was Shaad Ali’s first film. One of the finest directors, Priyadarshan has made successful Hindi films by legally lifting Southern hits. Bhool Bhulaiyaa was inspired from Manichithrathazu, in which Priyan had worked as a second unit director. His hilarious film, Dhol, was a remake of 1980 Malayalam film, In Harihar Nagar.

It is also seen that the Southern directors themselves direct the remakes. Recent example is Ghajini. Both the Tamil and Hindi versions were directed by A R Murugadoss. The Hindi version went on to become the biggest Hit of Bollywood ever! One of the most remembered films of the 80s, Ek Duuje Ke Liye, was a remake of 1978 film Maro Charithra and it was directed by K Balachander. Tamil film Minnale was remade as Rehna Hai Terre Dil Mein by Gautham Menon and it became one of the most loved youthful films. Shankar’s first Hindi film, Nayak-The Real Hero, was a remake of his film Mudhalvan. Priyadarshan has also directed some excellent Malayalam movies and remade some of them in Hindi.

In all the remakes, some changes were made but the directors were cautious enough to retain the same magic in the remake which led to the success of the original. But the directors of Kambakkht Ishq and Short Kut failed to do so and that’s why they failed to impress the audience.

Wanted

Two upcoming Hindi films are also remakes of Southern hits. Salman Khan’s next, Wanted(see pic), is a remake of Tamil blockbuster, Pokkiri. Like the Tamil version, the Hindi version is also directed by Prabhu Deva. Wanted is all set to release on September 18 and it’s expected to be an excellent action thriller. And some days ago, Arshad Warsi bought the rights of 2006 acclaimed Malayalam film, Notebook and is planning to produce its remake. Notebook was directed by Roshan Andrews, who also directed Udayananu Tharam, from where Warsi’s Short Kut was remade. Let’s hope Notebook remake doesn’t turn out to be a damp squib like Short Kut!
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WHY ARENT BHATTS PROMOTING JASHNN?

Many good films have failed at the BO due to lack of promotion. Last week’s Sankat City failed to attract audiences as it was not well promoted. And Jashnn, releasing tomorrow, may also suffer a similar fate. Produced by Mukesh and Mahesh Bhatt, the film stars Adhyayan Suman, Anjana Sukhani and Shahana Goswami and is directed by Hasnain-Raksha, who directed The Killer. Jashnn is a musical film and seems to be meaningful and interesting. Its songs managed to become somewhat popular. Promos of the film aren’t shown much throughout the day on TV and Shahana is not yet revealed in the teasers. Shahana, who won awards and appreciation for her role in ‘Rock On!!’, has an important role in the film and yet, is being sidelined.

Moreover, the film is releasing with a Hollywood biggie, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Thus, the film has almost no chance to succeed. Since Bhatts aren’t promoting the film properly, let me only do some promotion for Jashnn! I managed to find the theatrical trailer of the film and have uploaded below. Do check!

This post first appeared on MouthShut.com:http://www.mouthshut.com/diary/fgijoptlo/Fenils-Bollywood-Talk57

The Hindi film industry is infamous for lifting Hollywood movies, but it has often been inspired by cinema content from southern India as well. With forthcoming movies like ‘Kambakkht Ishq’, ‘Short Kut – The Con Is On’ and ‘Wanted’, Bollywood seems to be on a spree of remaking films made down south.

Bollywood borrows southern spice for 'Kambakkht Ishq', 'Short Kut'

Releasing Friday, Akshay Kumar- Kareena Kapoor’s romantic comedy ‘Kambakkht Ishq’ is the remake of Kamal Haassan’s 2002 Tamil hit ‘Pammal K. Sambandam’.

The film was earlier to be remade in Hindi by writer-turned-director Anees Bazmee for south-based production house G.V. Films, which had acquired the remaking rights for Rs.500,000.

But it was producer Sajid Nadiadwala who finally made it after buying remaking rights of the same film by reportedly shelling out Rs.7.5 million.

‘Short Kut’, another forthcoming comedy, is a remake of Roshan Andrews’ Malayalam movie ‘Udayananu Tharam’. Similarly, southern dancing star Prabhu Deva’s directorial venture ‘Wanted’, which has Salman Khan in the lead, is a remake of Tamil film ‘Pokiri’.

“Bollywood has always survived on the pillars of inspiration and remakes… whether it is the west or the south, it has always copied content. While half of it has been successful, others have been blunders,” said a trade analyst from Mumbai on condition of anonymity.

But Anil Kapoor, who is producing ‘Short Kut’, described the trend as a consumer-driven call.

“Actually it was not my idea to adapt a south Indian film… as a consumer I had seen this film in Malayalam and loved it. I thought it will be great to make the film in Hindi. I spoke to Anees Bazmee (who has written the script) about it and he too liked the idea of adapting it for a Hindi film,” the actor-turned-producer said.

While ‘Udayananu Tharam’ starred Mohanlal, Sreenivasan and Meena, its Hindi version, directed by Neeraj Vora, features Arshad Warsi, Akshaye Khanna and Amrita Rao.

“We made some changes in the script to suit Bollywood sensibilities and made it more appealing for north Indians or say core Bollywood audiences. After the script was ready, we thought Neeraj Vora would be the best person to direct the film. I called him up and he was on board,” Anil added.

A recent example of a successful Bollywood remake of a south Indian film becoming a huge hit is A.R. Murugadoss’ ‘Ghajini’ (2008) that was a remake of the 2005 Tamil film of the same name.

Starring Aamir Khan in the lead, the film went on to rake in more than Rs.290 crore (Rs.2.9 billion) worldwide, making it one of the biggest grossers in Bollywood.

Remaking southern hits is not a new trend in Hindi cinema. There have been hit films earlier like ‘Nayak’, ‘Saathiya’, ‘Viraasat’ and ‘Rehnaa Hai Terre Dil Mein’ that were remakes respectively of Tamil films ‘Mudhalvan’, ‘Alaipayuthey’, ‘Thevar Magan’ and ‘Minnale’.

Multilingual filmmaker Priyadarshan, known for remaking his own films in Hindi, had said: “My Hindi films are mostly inspired from Malayalam comedies.”

His popular films like ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’, ‘Kyon Ki…’ and ‘Garam Masala’ are remakes respectively of Malayalam films ‘Manichitrathazhu’, ‘Thalavattom’ and ‘Boeing Boeing’. His other Hindi remakes include ‘Virasaat’, ‘Billu’ and ‘Ye Teraa Ghar Ye Meraa Ghar’.

Tamil and Telugu filmmaker L.V. Prasad’s Hindi films ‘Sharada’, ‘Miss Mary’, ‘Chhoti Bahen’ and ‘Ek Duuje Ke Liye’ were also adaptations of Tamil films. A. Bhimsingh’s ‘Bhai Bahen’ was a remake of Tamil hit ‘Pasamalar’.

Bollywood saw a series of remakes in the late 1970s and 80s with Jeetendra in the lead in movies like T. Rama Rao’s ‘Lok Parlok’, ‘Judaai’, ‘Maang Bharo Sajan’, ‘Himmatvala’, ‘Swarg Narak’, ‘Jyoti Bane Jwala’ and ‘Pyaasa Sawan’.

Films like ‘Solva Sawan’, ‘Sargam’, ‘Sadma’, ‘Wo Saat Din’, ‘Aakhri Raasta’, ‘Andha Kanoon’ and ‘Eeshwar’ were also inspired by southern hits.

Bollywood saw its first anti-woman slant in the 1980s Rajesh Khanna-starrer ‘Red Rose’ adapted from Tamil film ‘Sigappu Rojakal’. And in 1992, Indra Kumar remade ‘Enga Chinna Rasa’ as ‘Beta’ as part of the continuing ‘south inspires north’ trend.

Source: IANS