Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘security guards

A man insisted that Govinda should marry him. When Govinda refused, he started stripping, forcing the actor to run away from the spot

By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 27, 2009)


A few days ago, Govinda got quite a scare when man dressed up as a woman entered Jal Darshan building in Juhu, where Govinda resides, and demanded to meet the actor.

Although the building’s security guards did not allow the man inside the premises and tried to talk to him, he refused to relent. An eyewitness says, “The man said that he wanted to meet Govinda at any cost. He refused to budge.”

When all efforts made by the security guards failed, they were left with no choice but to inform the star about the visitor. On getting to know about the hullabaloo created by the man, the actor agreed to meet him thinking that he might be one of his ardent fans.

 

Govinda

The actor was in for a shock when the man directly told him: “I am a man but I want to marry you. If need be, I am even ready to undergo a sex change operation, but please let’s start a life together.”

At first, Govinda was shocked by the revelation. Thereafter, he tried to explain to him that this was simply not possible. However, the man was in no mood to listen. When he realised that his sweet-talk was failing to do the needful, he started removing the padding he had worn, right in front of Govinda’s eyes, embarrassing him to no end.

That’s when the security guards took stock of the situation and had no choice but to manhandle the visitor. Meanwhile, Govinda, fearing that the man may get even more obscene, ran to his car and drove off.

Confirming the incident, Govinda says, “Haan, yeh sab hua tha. Woh aadmi mujhse shaadi karna chahta tha. He told me that his name was Sameera, but obviously, that was a false name. I told him yeh nahin ho sakta. Usne bahut masti aur battameezi ki. Ab sab kucch to main bayaan nahin kar sakta, na?”

A dead-drunk, rich daddy’s girl barged into Salman Khan’s private party and slapped him in front of everybody. This after she had abused Sushmita Sen and Sohail Khan

By Akela and Sonal Chawla (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 18, 2009)


He may be notorious as the bad boy of Bollywood but Salman Khan is anything but disrespectful toward women. How else would one explain his unfazed demeanor despite being provoked to the extent of being slapped by a girl? The shocking incident took place during a recent private party held in Delhi where a rich builder’s high-spirited daughter Monika allegedly barged into Salman’s private party and slapped him.

According to sources, she also ended up abusing Sushmita Sen, Sohail Khan and other guests who were present at the party. Ignoring the hullaballoo, the actor kept his cool and asked the security guards to show a sozzled Monika the way out.

A source from the party says, “After the fashion show by Sanjana Jon, a private party was being held at a five-star hotel in Delhi. Present there were Salman, Sohail Khan, Sushmita Sen, her brother Rajiv Sen, Raima and Riya Sen, Amaan and Ayaan Ali Khan, Shibani Kashyap, boxing champ Vijender Singh, a few Bollywood biggies and prominent politicos. The party, which went on till the wee hours of morning, was not without its fair share of drama. A sloshed Monika accompanied by a male friend first tried to forcefully enter the party venue. She was too loud and completely out of control because of her inebriated state. Sohail Khan, who was standing close to the entrance, saw the hungama and asked the security guards not to let Monika in.”

 

Salman Khan Sushmita Sen


“Meanwhile, Salman heard the commotion and walked to where Monika was making a fuss. She was misbehaving and started bragging about her connections and abused Sushmita Sen. When Salman very politely asked the girl to leave, she suddenly slapped the actor,” adds the source.

A crowd gathered and the guards whisked away the girl. “Known for his infamous temper, surprisingly, Salman did not retaliate even once. He kept his cool and went inside with Sohail after the girl was taken away,” says the source.

Despite repeated attempts at trying to talk to Monika’s friend, he said he was busy with somebody’s marriage and would be free to talk only after 15 days.

Shahid was mortified when some female fans repeatedly insisted, ‘Ganji nikal na. Bas kya?’ while he was shooting in Bangkok yesterday

By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; November 12, 2009)


Shahid Kapoor has set some rather high standards for himself by baring his chiselled body in Kaminey. And it’s something that he finds is not so easy to live up to. Take for instance what transpired on a beach in Bangkok, yesterday morning. A group of Indian girls on the beach demanded that Shahid should completely bare his upper torso for them.

The unusual demand happened on the sets of  Yash Raj Films’ next being directed by Parmeet Sethi. Shahid was shooting for a song where he had to take off his shirt while running out of the sea dressed in a vest and shorts. As soon as he took off his shirt, the girls started saying out loud: “Ganji (vest) bhi nikalo, jaldi ganji bhi nikalo’.

Shahid, known for his reticence, was horrified. An eyewitness says, “Shahid didn’t know where to look. He looked at Parmeet expecting him to tell the girls to stop passing comments.”

While the unfazed girls went very close to where Shahid was standing, neither Parmeet nor Ahmed Khan (choreographer) helped Shahid and they refused to tell the girls to step aside. “The security guards present on the sets too did not take any harsh steps because they were girls,” added the source.

What followed thereafter was even more embarrassing for Shahid. The girls started following Shahid and kept saying loudly, ‘Ganji nikal na. Bas kya?’ “Shahid, of course, did not oblige and was feeling extremely shy.”

Even after the shoot wrapped up, they followed him to his vanity van and waited outside for a long time. “They left only after the security guards politely asked them to leave. Only after that did Shahid agree to emerge from his vanity van and drove off to his hotel,” said the source.

Ahmed Khan confirmed the incident and said, “Ranbir and Shahid are two very popular stars today and both have a huge female fan following. I think every girl wants to see their bare chest.”

By Bollywood Hungama News Network, September 14, 2009 – 16:13 IST

Dil Bole Hadippa! A young, super-excited fan of Bollywood Hungama.com, Anita couldn’t help sharing her review of Dil Bole Hadippa with us after she caught a sneak peek of the highly anticipated film at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). Read on to find out if the movie lived up to her expectations.

For all of you who have been waiting to see Dil Bole Hadippa (DBH) and Rani Mukherjee’s triumphant return, you will not be disappointed. DBH was what Ta Ra Rum Pum and Thoda Pyaar Thoda Magic should have been, a light-hearted Indian-flavoured family entertainer from Yash Raj Films. It’s good to see that both Rani and YRF have returned to the formula that we all know and love.

The film starts out with Veera Kaur (Rani Mukherjee), a hardcore typical Punjabi kudi who is completely obsessed with cricket. She’s so confident of her abilities that she boldly claims that she can hit six sixes in a row, even when a pro pitcher takes her up on the bet. Veera also works alongside Shanno (Rakhi Sawant) and others in a dance troupe that performs regularly. Of course, while they perform, she’s backstage playing cricket with the kids, which is extremely endearing.

Enter into the story Rohan Kapoor (Shahid Kapoor) and his father Vikram Kapoor (Anupam Kher). Rohan is an accomplished cricket player in England who has lived there for many many years. Vikram somehow convinces Rohan to come to India and be by his side.

Dil Bole Hadippa! Vikram’s close childhood friend, Liyaqat Ali Khan (Dilip Tahil) is from Lahore, Pakistan. To foster peace between the two nations, the friends have set up an annual Peace Cup. Vikram asks Rohan to captain the Amritsar team and lead them to victory.

When Rohan comes across Veera for the first time, her adorably bad English and her defensive patriotism catch him completely off guard. She’s most definitely like no one he’s met before. Veera finds out that the Amritsar cricket team is holding tryouts for selection. She gets extremely excited and runs off to become the town’s new batting star. Unfortunately, when she goes to the tryout, the security guards and the rest of the men in line scoff at the notion that a woman could play cricket with them. Rani is heartbroken.

Rani realizes that she can dress up as a man and possibly fool the cricketers into letting her onto the team! Rani freaks out when she sees that the same foreign jerk who annoyed her, Rohan, is the captain. She stumbles and lies and tells him her name is Veer Pratap Singh. Veer succeeds in impressing Rohan and is accepted into the team.

After a lot of fun-filled moments between Rohan, Veera and Veer Pratap Singh, its time for the final cricket match.

Dil Bole Hadippa! Overall, I would definitely recommend Dil Bole Hadippa. It’s been a while since I’ve seen a movie that doesn’t take itself so seriously. I really liked that aspect of DBH. Plus, if you’re a Rani fan, this is most definitely the movie for you. She is beyond amazing and she is back like she’s never been before. Shahid is pretty much the most adorable thing ever and also a good reason to check out the film.

Anita can be reached at http://wasabi-girl1.livejournal.com/233500.html

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein or statements made in the above column are solely those of the blogger, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Bollywood Hungama. Bollywood Hungama accepts no legal liability or responsibility for any claims made or opinions expressed herein.

Shah Rukh Khan lookalike Raju Rahikwar’s documentary hits a roadblock as he is unable to get access to the star
By Kunal M Shah (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 31, 2009)

Shah Rukh Khan

Raju Rahikwar makes a living as a Shah Rukh lookalike and has  now made a documentary on his own life called, Living in King Khan’s shadow. Raju said, “I want the world to know how I have come up in life.”

Except for a quote from SRK, Raju’s 24 minute long documentary is almost complete. His attempts at contacting SRK have borne no fruit. Raju said, “I have been trying to meet him for a year. I went to his shoot at Filmistan recently, but his security guards didn’t let me meet him. On my second trip, they told me to handover a copy of my documentary and said that they would give it to SRK. I am not sure if they have.”

Raju Rahikwar

Talking about meeting SRK, Raju said, “I want exactly two minutes from him. I know if he knows it’s me, he will meet me. I have met him many times but I distinctly remember one time when I spoke to him.

He was at Holy Family hospital in Bandra. I went up and spoke to him. He was very humble.

He gave me his office number and asked me to meet him. Unfortunately, I couldn’t. I just wish he knows that it’s me who is trying to get in touch with him.”

Anupam Kher writes from London on his experience of working with Woody Allen on his new film
Posted On August 27, 2009 (MUMBAI MIRROR)

A few months ago, my agent in London, Ruth Young, told me that Woody Allen had cast me in his untitled film as Freida Pinto’s father. That news came to me on May 24, as I was hosting the celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the release of my first film Saaransh. No award that I had received in my quarter century in cinema could have made me happier than this bit of news.

Buried as I was with work, the excitement abated only to resurface on August 23, when I was set to go to London for the shoot. It suddenly hit me that I was going to work with someone I had adored and almost worshipped for decades. Then, a strange nervousness gripped me; just like it did during the first day’s shoot of Saaransh. But that was understandable when I was a rookie being directed by Mahesh Bhatt. Now I had acted in almost 400 films. Yet I was nervous.

To understand this reaction, I spoke to my mentor Mahesh Bhatt and asked him how I should behave when I would be on Woody Allen’s sets. Nervous, confident or important? Mahesh said, “Just be the way you are: inquisitive, nervous, and, be yourself.”

I reached London the next morning and was taken for a ‘costume and look’ trial. I was told that Woody Allen would see me the next day as he only meets actors directly on the sets on the day of the shoot. But I pleaded and they reluctantly took me to a holding area near the location. The scene that was being shot was the exterior of a restaurant on a busy street in Notting Hill.

I was introduced to Freida who was warm and turned out to be a great admirer of my work. She introduced me to her co-star, Josh Brolin and I told him that he was brilliant in Milk. I then went out on the crowded street and some Bangladeshis waved to me. But there was an overpowering silence. I was searching for the man who I had seen only in films and whose books I had read and who was my icon. And suddenly I saw him. He was in his trademark beige trousers, light blue shirt and brown shoes. His specs were black. His hair had gone whiter and strangely, he looked taller and larger.

I had never seen anyone in my life who was as focussed as him. For him, the world did not exist, the crowds did not exist. There were no security guards around him. All that mattered was the frame of his shot. Even the crowd sensed his concentration. In respect, passersby moved in silence.

The executive producer was apprehensive, knowing Woody’s reluctance to meet actors in advance. On seeing the waving Bangladeshis, she knew I was as famous in the sub-continent as I had been made out to be and that made her apologetic as well.

There was a gap in the shoot; Woody had turned to his iPhone and was listening with great concentration to some music. The costume girl then walked up to him and showed him my pictures with the ‘look’ and told him that I was on location. I was wondering what his reaction would be.  My tongue was swollen and my mouth was dry.

He turned around and tried to match the face with the picture he had seen. And then, he spotted me and smiled. I tried to portray the confident look of Anupam Kher the veteran of almost 400 films and the winner of many awards. But all I managed was the anxious look that I had when I had watched my first shooting as a 16-year-old in Shimla. That was Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore and Rakhee in Yash Chopra’s Daag.

I wondered if Woody’s smile was out of politeness. But there was warmth in his eyes. I felt as if it took me a year to cover the five feet that separated us and I can vividly remember each step. His grip was firm and before I could say anything, he said, “It is a pleasure meeting you.” I heard myself saying, “I can’t believe it!” Woody insisted and repeated, “I am really am happy to see you!”

I told him I had seen all his movies, and he kept nodding, as he had heard such comments many times in his career. Then he looked at me as if to say, “Can I go back to my work…”

The next day I did my scenes with him and I realised that all what I had experienced as an actor in the decades was not of much use as one could not depend on any one school of acting. In my eye flashed scenes from Annie Hall, Manhattan, Sleeper, Crimes and Misdemeanors…

Suddenly the sun got brighter and the shooting stopped. I asked an assistant the reason and was told that Woody does not shoot in bright light. Imagine, everyone loves to shoot in bright light, save Woody Allen!

I discovered that I had left my camera in Mumbai and decided that it would be a pity to shoot pictures of the occasion on my cell. And as the day ended, Woody was more vocal. I told him that Indian cinema was changing and how we were making the kind of movies we always wanted. His cogent response was that it could only happen when the audience changes. He spoke of his early years in New York when he would watch films by Satyajit Ray and Kurosawa. “But now, it is the time of $200 million blockbusters,” he said.

Later that evening, I bought a camera and clicked some pictures. I also got some books for Woody to autograph and gifted him copies of the Ramayana and the Gita. One of the vintage memories of that day I will carry is when Woody was shooting a scene with lots of people and he wanted, in his typical style, for the camera to move from one speaking person to another. At the end of it, he told his cameraman, “You were a little lost…but I liked the chaos.”

Indeed, working three days with Woody Allen has been my most memorable experience in cinema. And I wish to thank Indian cinema for making all this happen. As I have said in my one-man play, “Kuchh bhi ho sakta hai…” Or, as my grandmother would say, “Allah meherban to gadheda pahelwan!”