Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘shaad ali

In a rare display of guru-shishya bonding, Shaad Ali devotes himself to Mani Ratnam’s film; he is efficient assistant, nursemaid and mediator on the sets

By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; September 24, 2009)

In Mani Ratnam’s Raavana, Govinda plays Hanuman, while Vikram, the star from the south, plays Ram. Off camera, a heart-warming relationship between the guru and shishya is playing out on the sets. Even the crew equates Shaad to the devoted Hanuman, while his reverence for Mani Ratnam has put the latter on a pedestal as Ram.

Mani could not have wished for a better assistant than Shaad Ali. After directing films like Saathiya, Bunty aur Babli and Jhoom Barabar Jhoom, Shaad should ideally be concentrating on getting his next (with Yash Raj Films) off the ground. Instead, he prioritised his mentor Mani Ratnam’s film and rushed to the south to assist him.

Shaad’s involvement goes deeper than the professional commitment. He also plays Mani’s nursemaid and right-hand man. He ferociously guards the senior director from potential problems, tends to his dietary needs and keeps a paternal eye on his guru’s health.

Shaad Ali

Mani Ratnam

When Mani was hospitalised for his heart problem, Shaad was at his bedside constantly. He played a significant role in nursing the senior director back to health. His dogged devotion extends to monitoring Mani’s meals to keep the unhealthy stuff at bay. He fusses over his dietary dos and don’ts and nothing can get past his watchful eye, as he inspects the dabbas daily.

Shaad is up at the crack of dawn for a 6am shoot. At 5am, he makes sure that everything is in order and flawless to give his guru minimum reason to stress when he arrives at 5.45am. Even on the sets, everything is chalked out, so Mani doesn’t have to exert himself physically.

The assistant is also the good cop to Mani’s bad cop. Mani has the reputation of being quite the taskmaster, and the stars dare not voice their objections to the tough orders. Shaad plays the mediator and irons out any disputes brewing on the sets, often leading the problems to amicable solutions.

Even though stars return to Mumbai at the end of schedules, Shaad stays put by his guru’s side and intends to park himself there through post-production and till the film releases. As far as his YRF film is concerned, it was supposed to take off early next year. Mani’s health has delayed that project. An unperturbed Shaad has informed Aditya Chopra to push back the plans as well. Shaad’s new film has three heroes and three heroines, newcomers in all probability. He will not move on to his ambitious project with YRF, until his guru’s film releases in cinemas.

Shaad Ali has given new meaning to the phrase, ‘Work is worship.’

SK2 REMAKES OF SOUTH FILMS FAIL IN BOLLYWOOD!

The previous two Fridays saw the release of two biggies-Kambakkht Ishq on July 3 and Short Kut on July 10. What was common in both the films apart from the fact that both were comic entertainers was these 2 films were remakes of Southern films. While Kambakkht Ishq was a remake of the 2002 Kamal Hasan’s hit Tamil film, Pammal K Sambandam, Short Kut was a remake of a Roshan AndrewsMalayalam movie Udayananu Tharam. Don’t mistake it for a copy-the rights of both the films were acquired by the producers before remaking it.

Both these South films were big hits but surprisingly, their remakes have failed to impress the audiences. Short Kut took a bad opening and the collections didn’t improve in the weekend due to so many negative reports. Kambakkht Ishq (KI), on the other hand, did a great job in the weekend but the negative reviews prevented it from becoming a big hit. Some trade pundits are trying to save the film by mentioning that KI took a bigger opening than Singh Is Kinng and was at par at Ghajini. In its 1st week, Ghajini collected 64.41 crores and Singh Is Kinng made 39.72 crores. KI, on the other hand, manage to collect 33.42 crores (acc to boxofficeindia.com)! Figures speak for themselves! And the film has fallen greatly in the 2nd week and it’s difficult to say if it’ll recover its costs.

Coming back, Bollywood has since a long time got inspired from Southern films and churned out successful films. One of the biggest hits of 2002, Saathiya, was originally a Tamil film, Alai Payuthey, directed by Mani Ratnam. The Hindi remake was Shaad Ali’s first film. One of the finest directors, Priyadarshan has made successful Hindi films by legally lifting Southern hits. Bhool Bhulaiyaa was inspired from Manichithrathazu, in which Priyan had worked as a second unit director. His hilarious film, Dhol, was a remake of 1980 Malayalam film, In Harihar Nagar.

It is also seen that the Southern directors themselves direct the remakes. Recent example is Ghajini. Both the Tamil and Hindi versions were directed by A R Murugadoss. The Hindi version went on to become the biggest Hit of Bollywood ever! One of the most remembered films of the 80s, Ek Duuje Ke Liye, was a remake of 1978 film Maro Charithra and it was directed by K Balachander. Tamil film Minnale was remade as Rehna Hai Terre Dil Mein by Gautham Menon and it became one of the most loved youthful films. Shankar’s first Hindi film, Nayak-The Real Hero, was a remake of his film Mudhalvan. Priyadarshan has also directed some excellent Malayalam movies and remade some of them in Hindi.

In all the remakes, some changes were made but the directors were cautious enough to retain the same magic in the remake which led to the success of the original. But the directors of Kambakkht Ishq and Short Kut failed to do so and that’s why they failed to impress the audience.

Wanted

Two upcoming Hindi films are also remakes of Southern hits. Salman Khan’s next, Wanted(see pic), is a remake of Tamil blockbuster, Pokkiri. Like the Tamil version, the Hindi version is also directed by Prabhu Deva. Wanted is all set to release on September 18 and it’s expected to be an excellent action thriller. And some days ago, Arshad Warsi bought the rights of 2006 acclaimed Malayalam film, Notebook and is planning to produce its remake. Notebook was directed by Roshan Andrews, who also directed Udayananu Tharam, from where Warsi’s Short Kut was remade. Let’s hope Notebook remake doesn’t turn out to be a damp squib like Short Kut!
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WHY ARENT BHATTS PROMOTING JASHNN?

Many good films have failed at the BO due to lack of promotion. Last week’s Sankat City failed to attract audiences as it was not well promoted. And Jashnn, releasing tomorrow, may also suffer a similar fate. Produced by Mukesh and Mahesh Bhatt, the film stars Adhyayan Suman, Anjana Sukhani and Shahana Goswami and is directed by Hasnain-Raksha, who directed The Killer. Jashnn is a musical film and seems to be meaningful and interesting. Its songs managed to become somewhat popular. Promos of the film aren’t shown much throughout the day on TV and Shahana is not yet revealed in the teasers. Shahana, who won awards and appreciation for her role in ‘Rock On!!’, has an important role in the film and yet, is being sidelined.

Moreover, the film is releasing with a Hollywood biggie, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Thus, the film has almost no chance to succeed. Since Bhatts aren’t promoting the film properly, let me only do some promotion for Jashnn! I managed to find the theatrical trailer of the film and have uploaded below. Do check!

This post first appeared on MouthShut.com:http://www.mouthshut.com/diary/fgijoptlo/Fenils-Bollywood-Talk57

Why are Yash Raj Films recycling old scripts? Has inspiration dried up or are they overly fascinated with their own creations
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; June 27, 2009)
What’s with Yash Raj Films making endless unofficial remakes of its own films? While one segment of Bachna Ae Haseeno (featuring Minissha Lamba) was clearly inspired by Aditya Chopra’s Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge, Aditya Chopra’s latest directorial venture Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi had its seeds in its earlier production Aaja Nachle (directed by cinematographer Anil Mehta) where Sushmita Mukherjee craved for adventure and excitement while being married to a staid working class nerd (Vinay Pathak). Rab Ne… had Anushka craving for excitement while being married to Suriji.

Also, in Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi the wife couldn’t recognise her husband once he transformed his personality. The same premise is now being applied to YRF’s forthcoming film, Dil Bole Hadippa where Rani Mukerji disguises herself as a man to  play cricket in her smalltown team in Punjab but just as easily again becomes a  woman without anyone around her being wiser.

And if  you think that’s all there’s to Yash Raj’s penchant for  constant re-invention then get a  load of this.

Actor-turned-director Parmeet Sethi’s  directorial untitled  debut for YRF featuring Shahid Kapur and Anushka Sharma is  a  con caper  in the tradition  of  Steven Spielberg’s Catch  Me If You Can. The theme of two ‘lovable’ con artistes on the run has already been done by  YRF in  Shaad Ali’s Bunty Aur Babli.

What’s with Yash Raj’s paucity of  ideas? Are they so short of screenplays?

A source said, “The similarities that you’ve pointed out are definitely there. Maybe it’s because new exciting screenplays are hard to come by. Aren’t all big production companies doing variations on established films?”

About  two years ago Yash Chopra had complained about the acute scarcity  of  good writers.

Explaining his long absence from direction before Veer-Zara, he had said, “I’d love to direct more films. But I can’t find the suitable writers. I’m willing to open my doors for anybody who offers me a good script.”

Maybe variations on themes, already tried by Yash Raj, is their solution to the scarcity of good screenplays.