Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘shob charitro kalponik

Rita

RENUKA SHAHANE TURNS DIRECTOR!

Everyone who has seen ‘Hum Aapke Hai Koun..!(HAHK) must be aware of this actor. In the film, she played Pooja, Prem’s (Salman Khan) elder sister who meets with a tragic death. Renuka Shahane had become very popular after this film. She also acted in some of the sitcoms earlier. Although she became a known face after HAHK, she wasn’t seen in many films. But now she’s back as a director. Her first film, a Marathi one, titled Rita, is all set to release tomorrow. Renuka Shahane is also there in the film along with Pallavi Joshi, Suhasini Mulay, Mohan Agashe and others. Jackie Shroff also has an important role in the film. Rita in fact is Jackie’s first Marathi film. Surprisingly, just last week, he was seen as a Punjabi farmer in Kisaan.

Rita is adapted from a Marathi novel Rita Welingkar written by the eminent critic Shanta Gokhale, who is also Renuka’s mother. One look at the promo of the film proves that Renuka has sensitively handled the film and will surely impress the audiences. Co-incindentally, women debut directors have fared exceptionally well this year. Zoya Akhtar’s Luck By Chance was a top-notch product while Firaaq by Nandita Das was one of the most impactful films of this year.

The reason why I wrote about this film is because Renuka Shahane stays just a minute away from my house! She used to stay there with her mother until she got married. She occasionally visits her mother but still, I haven’t seen her even once. But I had a chance to meet his husband, actor Ashutosh Rana. I remember the date quite well-it was Jan 5, 2003. My friend stays in the building opposite Renuka Shahane’s and both these buildings share a common compound. I and my friends were playing there when a car stopped outside the compound and Ashutosh Rana came out. He was dressed as a neta-it was the get-up for his film, maybe. He went straight to Renuka’s house. At that time, I didn’t even know that Renuka Shahane’s home is located there and that Rana is her husband! After my knowledge was updated about this, I and my pals decided to take his autograph. I quickly went to my house and got a diary. We all were too scared to press the bell of the house. Finally, I went ahead and did the needful. Renuka’s mother (Ashu’s mother-in-law Shanta Gokhale, who wrote the novel from where Rita is adapted) opened the door. I told her about our wish to take Ashutosh’s autograph. She smiled, pinched my cheeks and went inside to call the actor! He came out and was too glad to fulfill our wish!

From that day onwards, whenever I hear about Renuka Shahane or even Ashutosh Rana, this incident instantly comes to my mind!
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SHOB CHARITRO KALPONIK RELEASED

SCK

Just imagine-a Bipasha Basu film released last Friday and hardly anyone knows about it. The film in question is Shob Charitro Kalponik (SCK), a Bengali film by the well-known director Rituparno Ghosh. The film had created some hype ever since news spread that Bipasha will be seen in a Bengali film. Last I had heard was Bips’ voice is dubbed and that Big Pictures have backed the film.

The film got a good release in Kolkata. In Mumbai it was released only in 2 multiplexes, 1 show in each and both these multiplexes are in South Mumbai. It is shocking that a Bipasha Basu film got such hype-less release. English subtitles were also there and so even non-Bengali viewers would have surely come to see the film, provided the film was promoted well and adequate shows were organized in more multiplexes throughout the city.

4 years back, even Antar Mahal (AM), starring Abhishek Bachchan, Soha Ali Khan, Jackie Shroff and Raima Sen had released without any hype. But compared to SCKAM had more number of shows. Critics had reviewed AM but in the case of SCK, I didnt see it’s single review in any newspaper. Maybe even the critics werent aware of its release! Very unfortunate!

Very often in life the people whom we love the most let us down the most. In ‘Shob Charitro Kalponik’, sensitive storytelling wizard from Kolkata, Rituparno Ghosh takes his protagonist, the unhappy wife Radhika, on a journey that opens doors within her heart that she would have liked to remain closed.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Review

Ghosh occupies the two mutually exclusive yet inseparable world of art and reality with a fluency and effortlessness that takes his characters far beyond the cartel of prototypes.

We see Radhika, trapped in state of marital unhappiness, as not just woman struggling to keep her home and heart together, but also as an individual trying to find her identity against odds that are created mainly in her own mind.

Orson Welles style, the ‘real’ personality of the dead poet emerges in flashbacks that are more cursory than comprehensive. But when has life ever offered complete solutions to the riddle of marriage that has puzzled man and woman for centuries?

Echoes that reach back to the very core of humanity reverberate across this miniature masterpiece on marriage and fidelity. Ghosh’s forte is the unspoken word. The bonds that form between Radhika and her maid and between Radhika and her colleague (Jisshu Sengupta) rely on resonances beyond the rhetoric of interactive art. The director creates room in cramped spaces.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Most of Ghosh’s narrative are vibrant vignettes behind closed doors done up in deep shades of anguish and bitterness. The progression towards a mellower comprehension of the tenderness behind the seeming spousal insensitivity begins after the husband’s death. The irony of loving a spouse after he’s gone is far from lost.

Radhika’s tormented understanding of her dead poet husband’s inner world is laced with luminous moments of revelatory tragedy, leading up to a finale that’s surreal and introspective. The hallucinogenic conclusion where Radhika enters her husband’s poetic world is charming, controlled and yet frightening.

Ghosh’s cinematographer Soumik Haldar shoots the interior of Radhika’s home as a manifestation of her innermost turmoil. She paces the bedroom, speaks to her dead husband, scolds and accuses him, as the family’s silently-observant maid tries to come to terms with the enormity of Radhika’s self-recrimination and loss.

The film is a work suffused with longing for a world that has slipped out of the protagonist’s fingers while she was counting the money in her purse. It’s the illuminating story of a woman’s voyage into the dimmed light of a yesterday that she thought was wretched.

But it was just life.

'Shob Charitro Kalponik': Sensitive marital drama

Finally, the impact of the marital tale depends completely on the central performance. As the working wife who feels her husband has let down their marriage, Bipasha pulls out all stops to deliver her career’s best performance. Her moments of anguish before and after her husband’s deaths are expressed in tones of cathartic conviction that we never knew existed within Bipasha.

In the scene where she shouts against her imaginary husband on his favourite chair, Bipasha furnishes the proceedings with the anguished portrayal of bereavement that perhaps only a Shabana Azmi can equal.

This despite the fact that Bipasha’s voice has been dubbed by a woman who doesn’t really have a say in the character’s portrayal.

But then in an ironic way, isn’t that what the character is all about? The disembodied voice is a reminder of Radhika’s dissociation from her own identity.

Somewhere in finding the centre to her marriage, Radhika lost it. And loss, as we all know, is one helluva upper for art.

Savour the delicacy of Ghosh’s poetic work. And never mind the spoken language. In a true work of art, the sound is the least important component. Listen carefully. You can hear the muffled sound of a broken heart in this film.

Rating-4/5

Source: IANS

Bipasha Basu is quite amused as her lines in her first Bengali film have been dubbed in a singsong style; forgives director Rituparno Ghosh as her performance hasn’t suffered
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 05, 2009)

Bipasha Basu in Shob Charitro Kalponik

Bipasha Basu may have made her displeasure known when Rituparno Ghosh, who directed her first Bengali film, Shob Charitro Kalponik, had got someone else to dub her voice that too without informing her. However, all differences were magically dissolved on Tuesday afternoon when the Bengali spitfire saw the film with her younger sister, Vijayeta and mother.

“Not all my grievances,” Bipasha quickly amends that. “But yes, most of my misgivings went out of the window when I saw the film. I still feel the voice speaking for me, is not mine. But luckily, the performance hasn’t suffered.”

Of course, for the first 15 minutes, Bipasha and her sister were in splits. “My sister couldn’t stop giggling because the voice was not mine. Bengali women have a particular way of speaking, it’s very musical. Sharmila Tagore, Aparna Sen and even Konkona Sensharma have it, but I don’t. My voice isn’t melodious. It’s husky and very easy to identify. Moreover, my character speaks in both Bengali and English, lots of English. My sister said, ‘That’s not how you speak English at all’. Of course, everyone will know it’s not my voice. My mother too was concerned,” says Bipasha.

But thankfully for Bipasha (or even Rituparno) the performance takes over. “It’s the best role of my life. The woman is so unlike me. To start with, she’s a lot older than me, her clothes (saris), mannerisms, body language and speech, everything is different. I play this woman whose husband is a poet and no wage-earner. So she has to reluctantly look after the whole family. It’s basically about the ideological gap between the couple, he being an idealist and she being the practical one. There are no outbursts. All the conflicts are muffled. I forgot how much hurt Ritu had caused me by dubbing my voice without informing me,” says Bipasha.

Rituparno Ghosh

After seeing the film, Bipasha immediately messaged Rituparno. She has also decided to dub for one print to be eligible for the National Award. “Earlier when the producers (Reliance Big Pictures) asked me, I had refused because of what had been done. I am very clear about what I want but I’m not obstinate. I’ll now dub for the National Award print. Also, the voice that had been used for me initially was that of an older woman,” she adds.