Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘stammers

By Taran Adarsh, August 12, 2009 – 21:34 IST

Dhan Te Nan. Vishal Bhardwaj pays homage to cinema of yore and that’s reason enough to go out and grab tickets for one of the most keenly anticipated films of our times.

A few monsoons ago, Farah Khan paid homage to the cinema of 1970s with OM SHANTI OM. Now Bhardwaj picks up characters that we have witnessed on the Hindi screen before, but executes it like Tarantino and Guy Ritchie do. He creates a film that’s so different from movies we’ve witnessed thus far.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Let’s say, KAMINEY is bold, stark, funny and unpredictable and that’s what works in its favour. There’re two more reasons: Shahid Kapoor and of course, ‘Dhan Te Nan’. Okay, we’ve seen Shahid pitching in a sincere act in his earlier films, but KAMINEY should catapult him to superstardom. His double role in KAMINEY is exemplary.

There’s another star in KAMINEY and that’s ‘Dhan Te Nan’. Your heart starts beating faster every time you hear this in the background or also when Shahid breaks into the song. The track is as big a craze as ‘Jumma Chumma’ [HUM], ‘Ek Do Teen’ [TEZAAB] and ‘Choli Ke Peeche Kya Hai’ [KHAL-NAYAK] and will contribute enormously in attracting viewers in hordes.

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Having said that, I wish to add that KAMINEY is not the usual masala film. Sure, it’s a well-made film, but there’s no spoon feeding here. One has to be attentive, very attentive to grasp the goings-on and also the twists in the tale. It’s not one of those lock-your-brains-at-home types, for sure. And that might not be too appealing a thought for those who swear by candyfloss or meaningless ha-ha-thons.

To cut it short, KAMINEY is a film with an attitude. Like it or leave it, but you’d never be able to ignore it. Word from the wise: Go for this hatke experience!

KAMINEY is about a pair of twin brothers, Charlie and Guddu [Shahid Kapoor]. Charlie lisps, while Guddu stammers. They are as different as chalk and cheese. And they can’t stand the sight of each other. Till one fateful rainy night, their lives cross.

Charlie gets mixed up in a deathly get-rich-quick scheme, while Guddu realizes that the love of his life, Sweety [Priyanka Chopra], has unwittingly put a price on his head. The brothers are sucked into a world of drugs, guns and money. Their lives collide head on with the lives of gangsters, rebel soldiers, rogue politicians and crooked cops.

The brothers have to run to protect themselves, their dreams, their love. And most importantly, realize that all they have is each other.

It takes time to get used to the world Vishal Bhardwaj wants us to enter. The characters, the relationships, the lingo, the tone and the setting… frankly, you don’t take to KAMINEY instantly. But twenty minutes into the film and things start falling in place. From thereon, you’re drawn into a different world completely.

The interval point raises the bar and also the expectations. The story takes a dramatic turn at this juncture, but minutes before that, ‘Dhan Te Nan’ makes the proceedings exhilarating and stimulating.

Right from the sequence after the interval to the finale, Vishal Bhardwaj peels off layer after layer, which erupts like a volcano towards the end. The end is long drawn and with so many characters in the film, it only takes time to give a culmination to each of those characters. And that gets tedious. The violent end might not find universal acceptance. Vishal Bhardwaj proves that he’s a master storyteller. KAMINEY is a damn difficult film to conceptualize and execute and Vishal does it with gusto. Besides the soundtrack [‘Dhan Te Nan’], the effectual background score only enhances the impact. The dialogues, also penned by Vishal, are super. At places, clapworthy. Tassaduq Hussain’s cinematography is top notch.

Shahid takes a really big leap with KAMINEY. Note how he handles the two characters, Guddu and Charlie, brilliantly. This film is a step to superstardom and also which will open new doors and vistas for him as an actor. Priyanka is first-rate. She’s so much in sync with her character. Also, she gets the Maharashtrian accent perfect. Amole Gupte is outstanding. An incredible actor! Tenzing Nima and Chandan Roy Sanyal leave a solid impression. Shiv Subrahmanyam and Hrishikesh Joshi are perfect.

On the whole, KAMINEY lives up to the hype associated with it. The film has three stars — Vishal Bhardwaj [a name that’s immensely respected by moviegoers], Shahid Kapoor and ‘Dhan Te Nan’ — and this combo as also the crooked characters and a genuinely hatke subject should guarantee ample footfalls in cineplexes even after its initial weekend. The weekend business should be huge due to the holidays all through the weekend: Friday [Janmashtami], Saturday [Independence Day] and Sunday. Of course, the business is bound to be affected in parts of Mumbai territory due to Swine Flu, but the film should take off in a big way when theatres re-open.

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Vishal Bharadwaj is as much of an enigma as his films. He goes incommunicado when he is shooting a film but is wonderfully articulate and expressive once the pressure is off. Perhaps because he started his career as a music director, his films are appealingly lyrical and poetic even as they explore the dark side of human behaviour
By Indu Mirani (MUMBAI MIRROR; July 22, 2009)
All your films explore the dark side of the human psyche…

Yes, I have been doing that right from Makdee, in which I tried to show life from the point of view of a child. As a child, I remember, one of my relatives was supposedly possessed by a ghost and we would take him to a Maulvi to get rid of the ghost. I was only 14 – 15 years of age and I was traumatised. Then as I grew up, I realised that I had to get this out of my system and so I made Makdee. I tried to do the exorcising with Maqbool and Omkara too but I think we can never get rid of our dark side. We get dark images everyday. But Kaminey, I would say, has the lightest side of that darkness presented in a humorous manner with some seriousness.Where did Kaminey originate? Was it an incident or a film or a book that inspired you?

Four years ago, Mira Nair assembled writers from America, India and Canada to mentor ten students from Asia and Africa. This scriptwriting workshop was held in Kampala, Yuganda. A young writer from Nairobi showed me a script which was a story about twin brothers and what happens in their life in a span of 24 hours. It was like parallel cutting and I really liked that approach. Mira and I spoke about it at length and both of us felt that it was a typical Bollywood masala movie. I was in touch with that writer for the next six months. He also sent me another draft. Then two-three years later I asked him to sell me the idea. He was in need of money so I sent him some 4000 dollars and bought the script to make any time. I picked up that idea and added Bollywood masala and my dark and serious side to it. So now, one brother stammers and the other has a lisp.

I thought that it would be exciting to make. But it wasn’t that easy. It was very tough and I had to work really hard. I would never like to make such a film again.

Evidently you took this film to several actors before you signed Shahid. How far is this true?

When I was working with Aamir Khan on Mr Mehta and Mrs Singh and we would sit together for drinks, Aamir would narrate two ideas to me and then I would narrate six to him. He would get excited about them and we would say we would work together. When I narrated this idea to him he expressed his desire to do this double role. It’s the same with Shahid and me. I must have narrated six other ideas to Shahid too but it’s not necessary that I will cast Shahid in each one of them.

If we are to be so guarded when we are working together, it will not be possible to work. When Saif and I were working, I would do the same thing with him too. He too got really excited about this movie. But when I actually decided to make the movie, I genuinely found that Saif was a little over age according to the character and I wanted someone younger. So it was my choice, I never offered it to anyone.

Today I might tell a story to Shahid but I might make the film with Emran Hashmi. That doesn’t mean I had offered it to Shahid. Shahid has offered me umpteen number of things. Kareena had said that she wouldn’t work with anyone apart from me. If we were to go by that she would only have one release every three years and not be able to work in even three films during her career.

There is a huge difference between discussing and narrating and offering someone a film and I would like to clear up the rumour by saying that Kaminey was never offered to anyone else and so no one rejected it. This film wasn’t ever offered to Saif. Saif and Aamir are very fine actors but ultimately it’s about my choice.

Does the title Kaminey reflect young people’s fascination for things negative?

I think today’s youth is more open to face their mean side. There is less hypocrisy and in time, that too will decrease. And something negative always attracts attention. I was at the airport and a couple with their little boy recognised me and started talking to me. The boy asked me “Uncle, what is the name of your movie?” and the father immediately said, “I will tell you later. Not now.” I said, “Why will you tell him later? It’s not a maa-behan ki gaali.” And I told the boy that the name was Kaminey. That kid laughed aloud.

During Omkara, I met an MP, who was upset with me because of the abusive language in the film. I asked him, when there is a clash going on in the streets with a lot of abusive language used by people, do you really go and stop them? So why do you want us to portray what is not true? We are giving you an option to avoid watching the film by giving it an A certificate. I have the right to portray reality. But I feel we become very uncomfortable with our own language. It’s easy for us to say f**k but in our language we can’t say it at all, only because that is our conditioning. We feel really offended in our language. But the youth don’t care.

Your films have been critically acclaimed but have never been a big success. Do you think Kaminey will break that pattern?

I have thought this for all my films till now. I don’t know. This time I have gone a few steps ahead in terms of the kind of audience I want to cater to. Inshallah, it should do that. But, god forbid, it may also not do that well. I only want Ronnie (Screwvala) to make money.

When you get stuck in your writing, who or what inspires you?

When I get stuck, I go to my friends, my co-writers. Most of the time, I get my solution. And it has also happened that I get such solutions that I have to ultimately stop writing. It has happened that we had written 70 percent of a film and suddenly a problem came up. We took it to a friend who told me that I would never be able to overcome this problem. So, it’s better to move on.

What is your stress buster?

Tennis. It’s my best time of the day. I play from 6.30am to 9am and it’s on my return that I compose most of my songs. I composed Naina thag lenge, when returning from tennis.

Does it bother you that your film is so much in news for your actors and their activities and not for the film itself?

I don’t think so because ultimately it’s my film. I feel happy that it is promoting my film. (laughs)

Most people consider Maqbool your most perfect film…

I don’t agree or disagree because it is based on one of the best works of Shakespeare. The basic texture and the content of the story are well structured and I also had the best actors of the century: Pankaj Kapoor, Naseeruddin Shah and Om Puri.

Will you ever make a candy floss romance?

I will make such films one day. It’s part of my agenda that I have to go back to the time when I was 17-years-old and had fallen in love for the first time in my small town. I want to capture that. Right now I am too busy dealing with the structural part of the film, how to shock people with the structures, the curves and characters. Slowly, I will move to the texture of the film and when that happens I will be more close to reality in the real sense.

What are you planning to make next?

I had started planning much before Kaminey was released. I want to do one film a year. I am young right now. I have the energy and I want to translate that on screen. Right now I have three four projects on hand, but the Hrithik film is closest to start.

What is it called?

We haven’t named it yet.

Is it going to be Harami, Kutta or something like that?

No no no..(laughs) its not going to be like that.

Is it a romantic film?

Yes, it is a romantic film.

Shahid was inspired by his dad Pankaj Kapur’s style of acting for his double role in Kaminey
By Subhash K Jha (MUMBAI MIRROR; July 11, 2009)

Shahid Kapoor in Kaminey

Shahid Kapoor, who plays a double role for the first time in Kaminey, has adopted his father Pankaj Kapur’s method of acting. Both the characters, Guddu and Charlie, played by the actor have speech defects — one stammers and the other lisps.

Pankaj Kapur has played two extremely diverse roles in Anubhav Sinha’s Dus. When director Vishal Bharadwaj asked the senior actor’s son to play the morally-incompatible twins, Shahid apparently studied the way his father played the double role in Dus.

Amole Gupte, who plays the villain in Kaminey, confirmed the news and said that he has never witnessed such diligence. He said, “When Shahid played Guddu, who stammers, he completely internalised all of the character’s traits, including the stammer, so the character doesn’t end up looking like a caricature.”

Pankaj Kapur

Amole Gupte

On many occasions, Shahid would remain in character for days so that he wouldn’t lose thread of the two roles. Elaborating on Shahid’s preparation for the role, Amole said, “Shahid stayed on the sets throughout and did not retreat into his vanity van to keep absorbing the ambience and the sweaty milieu in which Guddu and Charlie had to function in their own separate ways. I know that Pankaj works in the same way.

I truly believe that Shahid has inherited his father’s ability and style of performing without appearing to act. It is definitely in his genes. When you’re facing the camera with a co-star, you become compatriots in the canvas of characterisation. I was startled by Shahid’s passion for excellence. I saw the same quality in Aamir Khan (Taare Zameen Par).”



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