Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘stars

By Joginder Tuteja, December 31, 2009 – 16:43 IST

Yesterday, we went across the B-town and found that 3 Idiots was the unanimous choice when it came to the best that 2009 had to offer. The closest contender was Paa while Avatar led from the front when it came to Hollywood flicks. However, it was quite a divided opinion when it came to the worst of 2009. Quite a few names popped up, some big (Delhi 6, Chandni Chowk To China), some small (Dil Bole Hadippa), some relatively unknown (Videsh – Heaven on Earth, Victory) and a few completely irrelevant (Deshdrohi). There was also an emotional angle involved with a filmmaker or two criticizing their own effort (Sikandar). Read on:

Ramesh TauraniVictory, which came at the beginning of the year, stays on to be the worst film of 2009 for me.

Shirish Kunder Shirish Kunder – (Smiles) Yes, there is one movie which is really the worst for me. Still, I can’t name it since it’s been made by people known to me!

Kalki – Worst of the year was Billu (Barber) because it was just a series of music videos and nothing else.

Sajid Khan Sajid Khan – Worst movie of the year was Delhi 6. Really, I had a lot of expectations from the film but it turned out to be such a disappointing fare.

Hasnain Hyderabadwaala – The worst film of 2009 is Dil Bole Hadippa. Really, what were the makers thinking? Audiences were taken for granted that the protagonist out there won’t be able to differentiate between a girl and a boy despite a different physicality and voice.

Jagmohan Mundhra Jagmohan Mundhra – I have to pick two films here – Chandni Chowk To China and Kambakkht Ishq.

Rituparna Sengupta – There is nothing really which is worst for me because every movie has some effort going in there.

Ruslaan MumtazBlue is the worst movie of the year

Piyush Jha Piyush Jha – Even though I directed it, I believe worst film of the year was Sikandar. That’s because no one saw it and the media totally ignored its significance. Perhaps that happened because Sikandar didn’t have stars/big backers/comic entertainment. Whatever is the reason, the fact is Sikandar was ignored, and that is the real truth.

Sonu Sood Sonu Sood – (Smiles) Even as the entire year is through, I still can’t decide on one worst movie. Maybe I have missed it.

Suneel Darshan – 2009 started with its worst film Chandni Chowk to China It was a ‘directionless’ disaster that disrespected the viewer’s sensibility.

Sadaa – You are asking me about the worst film of the year? You know what; there have been so many that I don’t even care to remember.

Boney Kapoor Boney Kapoor – Preity Zinta’s Videsh – Heaven on Earth was the worst that 2009 had to offer.

Robby Grewal – Worst of the lot would be Deshdrohi (the film had a staggered release across 2008 and 2009)

Ananth Mahadevan – If I pick one WORST FILM of the year, I might just stir up a hornet’s nest. For, another one might cry out that it was more deserving. So let sleeping dogs lie!

Aanand L Rai – For me, the worst movie in 2009 was Delhi 6. It was a very fine concept and from a rock solid director. Still, it failed.

Hansika Motwani Hansika Motwani – I don’t really wish to pick and choose the worst film of the year because for me every movie is good. I know what are the kind of difficulties that we actors go through so it would be wrong on my part to say that this or that movie was bad!

Tusshar Kapoor – Worst of 2009 would be all those films that were released during the strike. Ha ha ha!

Kunal Deshmukh Kunal DeshmukhChandni Chowk To China was the worst film of the year. What a waste of effort. They could have done so much with the film but that was not the case to be.

Raksha Mistry – Isn’t it ironical that the first film which I saw in 2009 stays on to be worst for me? I am talking about Chandni Chowk To China. Maybe I was expecting a lot from the film’s association with Warner Bros. But then it neither had any locations of China nor Chandni Chowk. Worse, it had no story!

BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

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TROUBLED: Shahid Kapoor.
The actor spends 90 minutes at the US immigration

 

MEENA IYER Times News Network (BOMBAY TIMES; October 26, 2009)

 

Shah Rukh Khan’s ordeal on August 15, at the New Jersey immigration, threw light on a problem constantly being faced by Bollywood stars and their staff. And now like King Khan, Shahid Kapoor too apparently spent 90 minutes at the New York airport, while the authorities grilled his spotboy Mohammed Manjoor Allam, better known as Mamu in Bollywood. Mamu, an elderly gentleman, has been taking care of Shahid since childhood and is working as the actor’s valet or spotboy. Shahid is currently in the US for a 40-day schedule of Parmeet Sethi’s untitled venture being produced by Aditya Chopra. He had left for the US days prior to the release of his film Dil Bole Hadippa! along with actress Anushka Sharma, choreographer Ahmed Khan and a close-knit unit. For the first leg of the shooting, the unit was in Philadelphia and from there, they packed to move to the Big Apple last week. It was during his entry into New York that Mamu was asked to step aside and questioned separately as his name needed special clearance. A member of the unit said, “The questioning lasted for nearly 90 minutes. Though Mamu has travelled extensively to most countries with Shahid, USA is the only country he had not visited.” When Mamu was stopped at the airport, Shahid sensed that he was very nervous, especially since he wasn’t very fluent in English. Shahid didn’t allow him to feel isolated in a foreign land and sat with him throughout the questioning. Mamu was eventually let off, however, the airport did not give a reason for this 90-minute questioning. The actor was unavailable for comment, but his official PR spokesperson confirmed the news. “Yes this incident did happen,” she told BT.

As she gets ready to unleash her sense of humour on unsuspecting viewers with a new chat show starting tomorrow night, where she gets stars and other people to reveal unknown facets about themselves, Farah Khan takes time to introspect on her own life
By Indu Mirani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 22, 2009)
•      Let’s start with your favourite decade, the 1970s. In 1970 you came from this extremely rich family and by 1971, they were paupers. How did this happen?

I was five years old in 1970 when my dad (actor-producer Kamran Khan) had a spate of hits. The films were not A-grade movies but he was doing very well in his own right. I remember we had the first Impala car. Sajid had just been born and I was this absolutely spoilt child. Then in 1971 he made a film called Aisa Bhi Hota Hai into which he put all his personal money and the film bombed on the opening Friday. I remember it because I had gone to the theatre on Friday very excitedly with my grandmother and the theatre was empty. By Monday people stopped coming to our house. It was like a funeral. Our house usually used to be full of people. But by Monday, it was empty. And then there were bad times for 15 years till 1985, when he died. It was a very hard time, especially for him.

•      What are the good things you remember?

There are too many! I remember that everyday I had to go and buy a new record, by which I mean EPs or LPs. I was a spoilt child, so everyday, I was taken in the Impala car to Linking road, where there was this shop Twist and I would buy one. There used to be big parties in our house. Sanjeev Kumar, Jeetendra, Kalyanji bhai, Anandji bhai and people like that would attend.

•      And the bad times?

The bad times lasted longer than the good times. And also I was much older then. I know it sounds very filmi, but like you saw in the 1970s’ films that things are being sold from the house… it was literally like that. The one time I was really upset was when my gramophone had to be sold. But that had to be done because there was no source of income. My father was a very proud man. The Impala was sold and he obviously wouldn’t travel by bus to go anywhere. So he would just be home, and then he started drinking. I think those were really bad times.

•      Does your confidence stem from an ‘I will show the world’ attitude?

No, I don’t think so. I was not an angry, bitter person, but Sajid was. He had a very difficult time. He is five years younger than me and unfortunately he had been put in a very posh school. I went to a normal convent school but he was in a very posh school and being the poor child there was not helping. He used to be this very angry child and at one time we really thought that he was going to be a juvenile delinquent. So I am really very proud of what he does right now and he has really made something of his life. He used to go around scratching people’s cars saying ‘I don’t have a car so I will destroy this car’. He was really like this devil child. I didn’t grow up to be bitter. It was just something I had to cope with and look after Sajid too after my mom started working. Suddenly I was the responsible person of the house. By that time my mom had left my father.

I am still very insecure if I have not made a particular amount of money in a month. After a point, our house was run day-to-day. The people in our building would use our flat to play cards in. They would remove a kitty, and it would be some 30 bucks for the entire day. And that would be used to buy the milk and the grocery. And if for some reason they didn’t play that day, then those 30 bucks were not there. I remember we used to run the house on 30 bucks a day.

If all this had not happened to me I would not be who I am today. Maybe I would not have that determination to do something and be something in life. I remember in college I didn’t know what I wanted to do but I wanted to be somebody. There had to be something different about me. So I would probably go out of my way to make friends and please people. Maybe I took to dance because it made me feel special. I would go to a party or a social event and do my Michael Jackson moves and everybody would look at me. And I used to like that attention.

Salman Khan’s baby picture as revealed in one of the episodes of Farah Khan’s new show

•      How has all this experience and wisdom helped you in the show?

When I was approached to do the show I knew it had to be a slice of life show. And it could not have been just another show where the stars come and plug their films or say all sorts of things that they themselves don’t believe in. It had to be something about their lives and which is very personal to them, something that nobody knows about them. Like do you know that the sexy glamourous Bipasha is the ghar ka beta. Some of her childhood experiences are quite amazing and she had tears in her eyes when she was speaking about it.

•      Having said that, tell me something about you that nobody knows.

(Laughs) There are a lot of things that nobody knows and shouldn’t even know! I am a very domesticated housewife at heart. I listen to what my husband tells me. Not all the time, but I do respect what he says. Everyone thinks that I am this dominating creature and my poor husband must be henpecked but it’s completely the opposite. Whatever he says happens in the house, and how! I go outside and I shout and scream at people, but not in the house. In the house I’m a bheegi billi.

•      Give me an example of one thing he has said…

Just the fact that he said our children should never be publicised; I respect that and I haven’t, despite having gotten so many opportunities to be on covers of magazines and papers. But because he is not comfortable with it, it will not happen. Till he says it’s okay to do it.

•      Is SRK the most important man in your life?

He is one of the most important people in my life, regardless of man or woman. I think when you have babies; no one else stands a chance, not even the husband. The most important people in my life right now are Diva, Anya and Czar, then of course Shirish, Shah Rukh, Sajid.

•      How has Shirish (Kunder) influenced your style of filmmaking?

I have become far more aesthetic. Even in editing. He is far more a visual director than I can ever hope to be. I am little boring on that front, I am a little straightforward.

Jaanemann was far ahead of its time. I think if it would release today, the audience would be ready for it. Like a Kaminey today that you either love or hate. There is a certain audience today that has seen world cinema and is ready for this new age cinema. I think the story was a bit old fashioned but it was presented in a snazzy way. He learnt a lot from it. His new scripts are just fabulous. The way he thinks of constructing a scene is something I can’t think of. He just thinks out of the box.

•      You share a home and three kids, how much of your movies do you share.

Quite a lot. We are each others bouncing boards. Though some times my movies go over his head and he says, “I can’t understand what you are doing.” He tells me, “When I read it I am like what the hell but you do it with confidence.” He gives me all his scripts to read. Our movies will never be alike which I think is very healthy if we are going to be in the same profession.

•      Any surprises on the show?

Lots. I didn’t know that Hrithik still does one hour of speech exercises every day. He is afraid that the stammer will come back if he doesn’t do it. Or the things he went through as a child. As a 10-year-old boy he would sit in his room for 36 hours and practice one line to tell his cook, that I want to eat this, without stammering. You get goose bumps when you hear all this.

Family pays Rs five lakh for guest appearance at the crematorium to create a charade to fool the dead man’s creditors
By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 19, 2009)

Chunky Pandey who organised the star appearance

Stars have danced at shaadis, inaugurated showrooms, and even attended mundans for a fee, but this one still remains a first: When the thirty-something scion of a Mulund business family suddenly died, they hired a well-known Bollywood star to attend his funeral. He was paid Rs five lakh for the appearance.

According to actor Chunky Pandey whose wife Bhavna runs an event management company, Aim, he received a call early morning last fortnight from the family requesting him to attend the funeral at Mulund. “I was puzzled for a while thinking the guy must be related to me in some way, which was why I was being called for the funeral but then they told me they wanted me to do a rudaali, and were ready to pay Rs five lakh. I nearly fainted at the offer.”

The unusual invite came with an urgent reason. The deceased had run up substantial debts and the creditors had been knocking at his door. They wanted a star to be at the funeral to convey to the creditors that the dead man had been putting together a film and had spent all the money on that. “They wanted me to do a bit of rona-dhona and stand in a corner very quietly during the entire funeral. They said: ‘That would help us convince them (the creditors) that he’d been putting together a film with some actors,including you’.”

Chunky who refused to divulge the identity of the family, says he conveyed his regrets but the family was most insistent. “Their persistence was unbelievable, they kept saying if you can’t make it please get someone else to come.” Oddly moved by their plight he arranged for a replacement, a fairly well-known middle-rung actor from the industry. “I am not at a liberty to disclose who went instead of me, except to say the guy went very readily. Rs 5 lakh is not a small amount for standing like a statue for few minutes at an occasion where you are not going to talk much any way.”

The only problem was that the actor was told he’d be required for a few minutes but once he reached there the family would not let him go easily. “He’d been shooting that day and took a break to go thinking he’d be back on the sets soon but returned to the shoot after three hours. He called me to say he hadn’t anticipated that his little bit of moonlighting would disrupt the whole shoot.”

So any regrets that he turned down the guest appearance and the five lakh? “I didn’t even take any commission. As an actor I could have emoted whatever they wanted me to, but I am here to act in movies, not in funerals,” he shot back.

REVELATIONS! Farah Khan
… says Farah Khan, who’s just had a blast shooting for her upcoming chat show with a host of stars and common people

ROSHNI K OLIVERA (BOMBAY TIMES; August 17, 2009)


Shah Rukh Khan is a henpecked husband. Salman Khan’s a mamma’s boy. And Hrithik Roshan had speech problems as a kid. These are revelations by the stars themselves to their buddy and new host on the block, Farah Khan. The actor-turned-choreographer is set to host a chat show on TV for the first time. The show Tere Mere Beach Mein on Star Plus produced by Farah’s production house gives viewers a glimpse into the ‘real’ life of a celebrity. Set on a backdrop inspired by the beaches of Goa, it instantly sets a mood of informal, uninhibited chats with the stars. Farah gets candid with celebrities from various walks of life to discuss what they have in similar with the common man! “The show is not about a celebrity’s stardom, but about life away from the arc lights. They are not on my show to plug their movie or talk about controversies. We take up one interesting theme or issue and talk about that. There are also non-celebs who come on the show and share their
thoughts on the same topic,” explains Farah.

This seven week series comprises 14 episodes and the first celebrity on the show is Salman Khan with his mother Salma Khan, who’s always been media-shy. “It was so nice to have her on the show and she was absolutely candid,” says Farah. Brothers Irfan and Yusuf Pathan speak on sibling rivalry. “Yusuf was an eye opener, he was so funny,” reveals Farah. Karan Johar and Sonam Kapoor on the show talk about their journey from fat to thin and Shahid Kapoor and Genelia on second chances in life. “You see a different side of the celeb. From aspirational, it becomes more inspirational for the audience,” she points out. The show is her baby, right from conceptualising it
to the implementation. “For every episode there’s a lot of research that has been done,” she adds.
Farah may have directed people, been a judge on shows, but playing a host is another ball game altogether. “I was very nervous initially,” she reveals. “We first shot the episode with John Abraham and Yuvraj Singh and the topic was male eye candy, how men are suddenly shedding clothes like never before! As a host you have to be alert, spontaneous and quick with your responses. Here, I realised being a judge on TV was a cakewalk!”

Tere Mere Beach Mein will be aired every Saturday and Sunday at 9 pm on Star Plus
Rani Mukerji’s stars are unfavourably aligned till Sept 9; Aditya Chopra doesn’t want to tempt fate by releasing Dil Bole Hadippa before the date
By Vickey Lalwani (MUMBAI MIRROR; August 17, 2009)
Rani Mukerji is going through a slump, and she may have her stars to blame for it. Apparently, they haven’t been aligned in her favour for two years now. And who can fight destiny? Certainly not her boyfriend, Aditya Chopra, who has decided to schedule the release of her film Dil Bole Hadippa after September 9. For that’s when her unfavourable period ends.

After flops like Laaga Chunari Mein Daag, Saawariya, Thoda Pyaar Thoda Magic, Rani only has Dil Bole Hadippa in her kitty. She has been confined to Aditya Chopra’s production house, Yash Raj Films, and refrains from working with other banners. Hence, Dil Bole Hadippa is critical for her career. A source close to the actress said, “She is going through an unfortunate period in her rashi for two years. It ends on September 9. Adi wanted to release the film by the end of August or the first week of September. Now, the film has been postponed to the second week of September.”

Aditya Chopra has apparently been told that it would be better if he takes Rani’s stars into consideration. Yash Raj Films, which had taken a beating at the box-office with their earlier films, has finally bounced back with New York. Why take a chance and tempt fate? Hence, he is wisely mulling over the wait. After all, the wait might be worth it.

Dil Bole Hadippa


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