Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘sushant singh

After closing the year with films such as PAA and 3 IDIOTS, the year 2010 sure looks bigger and brighter for Reliance BIG Pictures with a mixed bag of films ranging from mainstream and masala to regional and art house.

With maverick directors such as Shyam Benegal, Mani Ratnam, Anurag Basu, Shaji N Karun, Rituparno Ghosh and Buddhadeb Dasgupta bringing the best out of Hrithik Roshan, Barbara Mori, Abhishek Bachchan, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Mamootty, Boman Irani, Jishu Sengupta, Indraneil Sengupta, Kangana Ranaut amongst many others the Reliance BIG Pictures slate is sure to watch out for!

Have a sneak peek into Reliance BIG Pictures’ slate of films for the year 2010:

view KITES movie stills
KITES

KITES:

A truly international film KITES tells the story of a young con-man who lives ‘life’ in Las Vegas, always ready to make fast money in any way possible, always looking for the big score. Directed by Anurag Basu and produced by Rakesh Roshan the film stars Hrithik Roshan, Barbara Mori, Kangana Ranaut and Kabir Bedi. It is shot in Mumbai, New Mexico, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles. The film will have and Indian and international version which will release simultaneously. Brett Ratner, best known for the RUSH HOUR series, FAMILY MAN starring Nicholas Cage and X-MEN THE LAST STAND is currently at work on the English version of KITES and tailoring it to appeal it to an international audience.

view WELL DONE ABBA movie stills
WELL DONE ABBA

WELL DONE ABBA:

WELL DONE ABBA is the story of Armaan Ali, a driver working in Mumbai. He takes leave for a month to find a husband for his teenage daughter, who lives in a small locality close to Hyderabad. Armaan Ali returns to work only after 3 months. His young employer wants to sack him but is persuaded to listen to the reason why Armaan got so delayed.

Directed by Shyam Benegal stars Boman Irani, Minissha Lamba, Sammir Dattani, Ila Arun, Sonali Kulkarni, Ravi Kishen, Rajit Kapur, Ravi Jhankal and Yashpal Sharma.

RAAVAN:

Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan come on screen together in Mani Ratnam’s RAAVAN – a modern day adaption of the epic Ramayan, being readied in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu.

MIRCH:

Directed by Vinay Shukla MIRCH revolves around the protagonist Maanav, a committed struggling filmmaker whose girlfriend Ruchi, a successful film editor, arranges for him to meet film producer Nitin, who is not very convinced about Maanav’s script. Maanav then suggests four stories on infidelity, woven together by a common story.

The film stars Konkana Sen Sharma, Raima Sen, Shahana Goswami, Shreyas Talpade, Rajpal Yadav, Boman Irani, Sushant Singh, Arunoday Singh and Prem Chopra with special appearances by Saurabh Shukla & Tisca Chopra.

view CHALOO MOVIE movie stills
CHALOO MOVIE

CHALOO MOVIE:

The police raid a theatre where movie tickets of a very successful film are being sold in black. When Police Inspector Sher Khan interrogates Khoji, a man in his 20s, he claims that he is the director of the very film whose tickets he is selling in black. The cynical Sher Khan puts Khoji behind bars after which he receives two phone calls – one from the Police Commissioner and another from the dreaded don ‘WC’, both of whom support Khoji’s detention. A hilarious turn of events reveal who Khoji is, whether he is really the film’s director, why is he selling his film’s tickets in black and what do the Police Commissioner and don ‘WC’ want from Khoji.

Starring Rajpal Yadav, Shekhar Suman, Divya Dutta, Hrishta Bhatt and Sayali Bhagat, CHALOO MOVIE is directed by Vinod Pande.

Reliance BIG Pictures, the most committed motion picture company producing regional films in 8 Indian languages is working persistently towards taking them beyond the conventional Diaspora

The slate of films includes:

KUTTY SRANK: Shaji Karun’s Malayalam film KUTTY SRANK starring Mamooty, Kamilini Mukherjee, Padmapriya and Meenakumari brings out three distinct personalities of a dead boat-man from the perspective of three women each of whom claims to be his wife.

ABOHOMAAN
ABOHOMAAN

ABOHOMAAN: Rituparno Ghosh’s Bengali film ABOHOMAAN starring Dipankar De, Mamata Shankar, Ananya Chatterjee, Jishu Sengupta and Ria Sen brings to the screen a sensational relationship between a film-director, a young actress and a wife who swears to ruin her husband’s life and career and a son who gets caught in the cross-fire in this extravagant drama.

JANALA: Buddhabed Dasgupta’s Bengali film JANALA starring Tapas Paul, Swastika Mukherjee and Indraneil Sengupta is the journey of a solitary man against the wrath of circumstances when he decides to pursue his little impulsive dream.

IJJODU: by the maestro M S Sathyu is a film about a photo journalist who finds an interesting girl who has been exploited on the name of religion. He succeeds in breaking her blind belief but fails to accept her to give her an alternative life. This Kannada flick stars Meera Jasmine and Anirudh.

GLAMSHAM.COM

By Taran Adarsh, December 29, 2009 – 08:11 IST

Raaja Mukherjee, who has been associated with a lot of television serials as a producer, is now working on his first home production – LIFE ISE GALE LAGA LE. It is written and directed by Yogesh Pagare. Shooting is scheduled to start in January 2010 and the film is expected to be wrapped up in 45 days.

Asked if Rani will also star or will have any role to play in or around the movie, Raaja replied, “Rani’s good wishes and support is always there for her family and in all their ventures.”

Starring Adhyayan Suman, Divya Dutta, Sushant Singh, Aushima Sawhney, Rishi, Rahul Dev, introducing Vaibhavi Upadhyay, Puneet Vashist, Anita Hassanandani and Himani Shivpuri, LIFE ISE GALE LAGA LE is a reverse journey from death to life. The tracks are composed by music director Lalit Pandit.

BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

By Taran Adarsh, September 11, 2009 – 10:43 IST

Gangster movies – this genre has been done to death. Films like PARINDA [Vidhu Vinod Chopra] and SATYA [Ramgopal Varma] stand tall on this list. But, of late, the genre has taken a backseat since people aren’t too keen on watching bloodshed and the same old saga of an innocent taking to the world of crime.

BAABARR belongs to the same genre, yet is an exception. It shows how people, even kids, live by the gun and die by the gun. It tells you that crime never ends, it only changes faces. It tells of the wicked nexus between cops-politicians-gangsters and the deterioration of the law and order machinery. Also, this one’s not Mumbai-centric, but is set in Uttar Pradesh.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

BAABARR isn’t just bloodshed, but at the same time, isn’t for the faint-hearted either. There’s violence galore, in fact several sequences are brutal, and chances are a section of the movie-going audience [read families/ladies] might shy away from this experience.

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Yet, what makes BAABARR a must-watch experience is its story, the strong script [Ikram Akhtar] and the deftness with which director Ashuu Trikha has narrated the story. Without a shred of doubt, BAABARR is one of the most powerful films to come out of Bollywood in 2009.

A 12-year-old boy picks up a country made gun and shoots a man in cold blood. His eyes are devoid of any emotion. His heart exhibits no remorse. After shooting the person in broad daylight, he walks the streets of Aman Ganj with a gun in one hand. Everyone present in the market watches this young lad walk with no fear.

The boy, who started from the streets of Aman Ganj, had trespassed every barrier of crime. For the 10 years that followed, he traumatized one and all. His reign of fear terrorized everyone in the state, right from the common man to the Government. He was Baabarr [Sohum Shah].

When this reign of fear knew no bounds, the Government summoned a man to put an end to all of this: Encounter specialist S.P. Dwivedi [Mithun Chakraborty]. The order was simple, arrest him or kill him.

What’s the star cast like, that’s one question people generally pose when you ask them out for a movie. BAABARR has a new face – Sohum – but that exactly is its USP. Fortunately, he doesn’t carry the baggage of an image and that makes the character even more believable.

But there’s a flipside too. BAABARR is dark and gruesome and a few sequences can actually put you off, which, indirectly, also speaks of how impactful the film is.

Writer Ikram Akhtar’s script is power-packed and has several twists and turns in those 2 hours. In fact, even the final sequence of the film catches you unaware and that’s what makes BAABARR stand out from the crowd. The dialogues deserve special mention.

BAABARR is Ashuu Trikha’s best work so far. His handling of the dramatic sequences is commendable. Action scenes [Abbas Ali Moghul] are true to life. Cinematography [Suhass Gujarathi] deserves full marks. In fact, a film like BAABARR is difficult to shoot and it must’ve been a challenge for the DoP to give the right texture to the film.

Sohum lives the character of Baabarr and delivers a performance that you carry home after the show has concluded. The film would’ve fallen flat had it been entrusted to a lesser actor. Mithun Chakraborty is very good. In fact, this is amongst his better works. Om Puri stands out. This film should easily stride into ‘Best of Om Puri’ catalogue. Tinnu Anand is a revelation. Where was Tinnu all this while? Watch his death sequence in the film and it’s sure to give you gooseflesh. Shakti Kapoor is top notch. Again, he seems to be in form after a long, long time.

Sushant Singh is perfect for his part. Urvashi Sharma enacts her part with complete understanding. Govind Namdeo is competent. Mukesh Tiwari is, as always, good. Vivek Shauq, Vishwajeet Pradhan and Pratima Kazmi make an impact in brief roles.

On the whole, BAABARR is a captivating and powerful tale. Sure, there’s excessive violence, but there’s a reason behind it and that works in its favour. At the box-office, it has best chances in the Northern belt and also at single screens mainly.

GETTING REAL: Ashuu Trikha
..says director Ashuu Trikha in a candid chat with BT

AAKANKSHA NAVAL-SHETYE (BOMBAY TIMES; September 8, 2009)


Ashu Trikha believes in following his dreams, even if that means waiting for three years to realise them. Not the one to follow a beaten path, the director, who’s also directed Alag, is back with another hatke film, this time based on the crime scene in Central India. Titled Baabarr, the film marks the debut of newcomer Soham along with actress Urvashi Sharma and also stars stalwarts like Mithun Chakraborthy, Om Puri, Tinnu Anand and Sushant Singh. Here, the filmmaker talks about his crime caper.

Baabarr is based on real-life incidents. What made you choose such a hard-hitting subject?
• The entire fact that such incidents have happened and continue to happen even today, and that the characters depicted in the film really do exist, is a matter of great shame for any society. It was something that I felt about very strongly.

You tried to deal with the film in realistic manner…
• Yes, because the film required it. Baabarr is a stark film, not for the fainthearted. A lot of research has gone into it. And during that, we realised that to get the right feel, it was important to keep the backdrop as natural as possible. So whether it’s shooting on rough terrain or in real locations or with real country made revolvers, we have tried to present reality in the truest form.
Your last few films have all been very different. Weren’t you wary of taking a risk with such a serious film on crime?
• Every film is a risk. The only thing in our hands is to make a film sincerely and with all honesty.
On the one hand you have a newcomer Soham and on the other hand you have stalwarts like Om Puri and Mithun Chakraborthy…
• Yes. And I felt like I’m having the best of both the worlds. There was raw talent waiting to be honed and there was a sea of experience waiting to be tapped. Omji and Mithunda are some of the finest actors to date, while Soham has the spark and is spectacularly good as a debutante.

Do you think a film so real is commercially viable?
• Absolutely. The film is not a documentary. It has its light moments, there are songs and dances too, but none of them have been forcibly included. So, it’s very much a hard-core commercial film, but with it’s sensibilities rooted in realism.

What was the most challenging thing about shooting for the film?
• Shooting in the kind of conditions that we did was challenging. Because unlike shooting in a studio which is quite a controlled environment, shooting in rough terrain is physically very demanding.

What’s the message you want your audiences to take home after watching the film?
• I don’t want to preach anything through my film. I only want them to question where we are headed as a society.

(Contributed by AKNS and Harshada Rege)

By Taran Adarsh, September 4, 2009 – 11:31 IST

Browse a newspaper or surf news channels and I am sure, you’d be enlightened with more than a hundred stories in the course of a day. But not all stories have the potential to be adapted for the big screen. MOHANDAS suffers due to this reason.

MOHANDAS is a poignant tale and is well shot too, no doubt, but the question is, does it hold your attention for the next 2 hours? In parts, yes, not in totality. At best, MOHANDAS might strike a chord in the film festival circuit, that’s it! Catering to a really miniscule audience.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

Meghna [Sonali Kulkarni], a correspondent working at a news channel in New Delhi, receives a videotape from a remote place in Madhya Pradesh. On the tape, a battered young man claims to be the real Mohandas [Nakul Vaid] and alleges that someone else has stolen his identity. Someone else is living as ‘Mohandas’.

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Intrigued by what looks like an unusual small-town scam, Meghna makes a trip to that place. There, she unearths the true story. Mohandas is a topper in studies and is overjoyed when he is selected for a job in Oriental Coal Mines. But he is kept waiting and waiting to actually get the job. Long afterwards, when he has given up and reconciled to it, he learns that someone else has assumed his name and has already taken his job. When he rushes to protest, he is beaten up and thrown out.

Meghna places this story in the media. Harshvardhan [Aditya Srivastava], a lawyer from the district, takes this case of stolen identity to court with the intention of hauling up the usurper. But will things change?

In most cases, the choice of the subject is right, but the director makes mincemeat of it. But in this case, debutante director Mazhar Kamran makes a sincere attempt to narrate this unconventional story well. A number of sequences are truly well executed, especially the end, which comes as a shocker.

But, at the same time, Mazhar should’ve restricted the narrative to 1.30 hours, instead of almost 2 hours. Also, after a point, it becomes one of those films that depict the good in good light and the corrupt in bad light. In short, it gets bland and monotonous!

Nakul Vaid plays his part very well. Sushant Singh doesn’t get scope, but nonetheless leaves an impact. Sharbani Mukerji has transformed herself well for this part. Sonali Kulkarni gets her role right. Aditya Srivastava, as always, is competent. Govind Namdeo is first-rate. Sameer Dharmadhikari gets no scope. Uttam Haldar is proficient.

On the whole, MOHANDAS is a well-intentioned, well-made film, but it will have a tough time standing on its feet due to lack of face-value and also multiple releases.

Rating:[critique] 

By Taran Adarsh, August 28, 2009 – 11:30 IST

Gift an infant his/her favourite toy and see how the toddler plays it with glee. In TOSS, the camera seems to be the toy for debutante director Ramesh Khatkar. He plays with the camera so much, experimenting with zany frames, that you get put off after a point.

TOSS has an interesting thought that the urban junta would like to watch, but the screenplay blows the story to smithereens. This thriller thrills in bits and spurts and the final outcome is least exciting.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

The culprit here, like most films helmed by debutantes, is that form overpowers content to such an extent that what you get to watch is a good looking film with minimal substance to offer.

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In a nutshell, the subject goes for a toss in TOSS.

TOSS tells the story of a bunch of friends who, on their way back from a vacation, stumble upon a fortune. They decide to split the money and start dreaming a king’s life. Soon, before they realize the owners of the booty are after them, the law is after them and worse, they are after each other.

After a lot of camera jugglery at the start, the director takes his own sweet time to come to the point. The concept of money being the root of all evil is enticing and the writers could’ve come up with a riveting screenplay. Sadly, the writing is so childish at times that it fails to do justice to the subject.

Debutante director Ramesh Khatkar seems to have concentrated more on making a technically attractive project, instead of telling an absorbing story. Music [Sandesh Shandilya and Siddharth-Suhas] isn’t invigorating either. Background score [Ranjit Barot] is far more effective. The visuals [DoP: Anil Akki], of course, are good and that’s what you carry home.

Amongst actors, Prashant Raj is the best of the lot, followed by Ashmit Patel and Aarti Chhabria. Rannvijay is a non-actor and even the length of the role is minimal [he’s killed before the interval]. Zakir Hussain irritates. Mahesh Manjrekar and Sushant Singh are wasted. And what did Vijay Raaz see in this role? Rajpal Yadav gets no scope either.

On the whole, TOSS is body beautiful minus soul.