Fenil and Bollywood

Posts Tagged ‘violence

By TUSHAR JOSHI (Mid-Day; December 23, 2009)

Despite an ‘A’ certificate, the panel suggests major cuts in the film

Mahesh Nair, director of Celina Jaitly-Farooque Shaikh starrer Accident On Hill Road is a livid man. The Censor Board has objected to a one minute-50 second scene in his movie. The scene showing Celina and Abhimanyu Singh in bed making love has raised the eyebrows of the authorities making them chop some portions.

The film has been given an ‘A’ certificate, but Nair says the board isn’t playing fair. “In the recent past, there have been movies depicting violence and sex but that has gone unnoticed.”

Claiming that his love making scene is aesthetically shot he adds, “In fact, the portion they have raised objections to, doesn’t even have a liplock. Despite that they have problems with it.”

Describing the three issues the board has raised, Nair says, “Their first problem was that they objected to the lady removing her undergarments in the scene. However, Celina wears stockings that Abhimanyu removes before their lovemaking. I don’t think stockings are undergarments, and the board should understand that.

Secondly, they had an issue with too much caressing happening between the actors. They told me instead of touching each other why can’t they express their love by looking at each other, through their eyes! Lastly, they thought that one minute and 50 seconds was too long a time for the actors to establish a relation between the two. All these points are totally baseless and unwarranted.”

Furious that he has to go with the cut, Nair feels the board only picks on small budget films. “I don’t want to take names, but there have been so many films this year with enough liplocks and fight scenes depicting brutality which have made it without cuts, why give a different treatment to me?”

krkBharati Dubey | TNN (THE TIMES OF INDIA; October 22, 2009)


Mumbai: For the first time in the history of reality television, a participant has been thrown out for violent behaviour. It is learnt that the producers of Bigg Boss took the decision after all the participants threatened to walk out of the house if actor-director Kamal R Khan of Deshdrohi fame was not thrown out.


The show’s producer, Ashvini Yardi, confirmed, “Yes, Kamal R Khan has been ousted from Bigg Boss Season 3.” She added, “His behaviour was not acceptable at all. We don’t advocate the use of violence to settle differences. What Kamal did was completely out of line and against the rules of the Bigg Boss house. So he asked to leave the house.”


A source said, “Khan has been misbehaving with all the participants. What’s appeared on television is only about one-third of his bad behaviour. The last straw was when he threw a bottle at a participant. What began as a verbal spat between Khan and Rohit Verma took an ugly turn when Khan threw a bottle of water at Rohit. Rohit ducked, but Shamita Shetty wasn’t as lucky—the bottle hit her hand. Khan also got into a fist fight with Raju Srivastav.”


In the original version of the show, Big Brother, in Australia, two participants were temporarily removed for allegedly sexually assaulting another participant in 2006. In 2007, UK Big Brother participant Jade Goody was thrown out for racist remarks against Shilpa Shetty.


Indian reality shows too are no strangers to dramatic exits. TV actor Shweta Tiwari walked out of Iss Jungle Se Mujhe Bachao saying she couldn’t cope with jungle life and her co-participants. Politician-actor Rahul Mahajan walked out of Bigg Boss after being asked to apologise for running out of the house. TV actor Chetan Hansraj got into a fist fight with a participant on Bollywood Ka Ticket. Trade pundits say much of the high drama on reality shows is scripted.


Reality show writer Mamoj Munteshir, shocked at the latest episode, said, “I don’t see this as a good sign for India’s global image. With due respect to Khan, I ask if he’s proud of his behaviour in the Big Boss house.” He added that channels and production houses had to be accountable while selecting contestants for reality shows.

Bollywood Flick On Naxal Menace Will Also Incorporate YSR Chopper Crash In Bastion

Meenakshi Sinha | TNN (THE TIMES OF INDIA; October 5, 2009)


New Delhi: Wedded to the gun and determined to manufacture an armed insurrection, the radical Reds have spread their tentacles across large swathes of the country. And Bollywood is ready to capture the growing menace in a forthcoming flick, ‘Red Alert: The War Within’.

“The film couldn’t have been more timely,” says director Ananth Mahadevan. He adds, “When I showed the film in Stuttgart, people around the world recalled their own rebellions. They had the same question that the film raises: does the end justify the means?” Viewers might also find shades of Kobad Ghandy in one of the film’s characters played by Vinod Khanna, says Mahadevan.

Since the late 1960s, the Naxalite movement has strongly appealed to a section of the urban youth as well
as the rural masses. But there have been few films on the subject. Films such as Mrinal Sen’s ‘Calcutta 71’, a searing study of Naxalism, violence and corruption in the politically-charged Seventies, and Khwaja Ahmad Abbas’ ‘The Naxalites’ (1980), starring Smita Patil and Mithun Chakraborty, were exceptions rather than the rule.

Trade expert Komal Nahta offers an explanation. “Films on Naxalism are generally perceived to be depressing and, therefore, find few producers. The common man is not aware of the subject. Hence, it has a sectional or intellectual appeal” he says.

Sudhir Mishra, whose ‘Hazaaron Khwaishein Aisi’ (2003) dealt with the problem, offers a different view. “Most Bollywood filmmakers mentally live in New York and London. They are illiterate about real India and find it unfashionable to pick up topical sub
jects,” he says.

Sudhir finds Naxalism appealing because it made some of the brightest men from affluent back
grounds, leave the comforts of their homes in pursuit of an idea. “When you explore Indian reality, you realise that over 150 districts are prone to Naxalism. That speaks volumes for its reach. Here, the violence is in malnutrition and lack of justice,” he says.

There have been some other films on Naxalism. Sanjiv Karambelkar’s ‘Lal Salaam’ (2002), starring Nandita Das and Sharad Kapoor, is based on true incidents of victims of police brutality in Nagpur turning into armed rebels due to an unresponsive government. The film flopped in most territories but became a surprise hit in the naxalinfested regions of Bihar.

‘Red Alert’ will also incorporate YSR Reddy’s chopper crash site in the Nallamala forests. “We replicated the entire forest in Khandala,” says Mahadevan. His art director, Sanjay Jhadav, canned shots of Telengana’s signboards, activities of the dalams (naxal groups), market streets and the village square where the cops were hanged and recreated them in Khandala.

WATCH THE PROMO OF RED ALERT-THE WAR WITHIN HERE

Swati Deshpande | TNN (THE TIMES OF INDIA; September 30, 2009)


Mumbai: He’s a “small-time actor’’, and while he may be no “saint’’, he’s “no rapist’’ either. This is what actor Shiney Ahuja’s lawyers said, seeking bail pending trial on charges of raping his 20-year old maid at his Andheri home one morning.


In a fresh bid for freedom after spending more than 100 days in jail, the 35-yearold actor–through his counsel Shirish Gupte along with Shrikant Shivade–said the “victim has not even used the word ‘rape’ in her statement to the magistrate regarding the June 14 incident’’. She “had no external injuries, creating doubts over her claim that she resisted him’’, they said. The complainant had called Ahuja many times from her cellphone the pre
vious night, said Gupte.


Forensic experts have said earlier that the absence of external injuries did not mean there was no rape. A woman could be forced into the act by the threat of violence, experts reasoned.


The panchnama noted that when he was arrested on June 15, Ahuja’s left wrist and right little finger had a “nail mark’’ which the actor claimed were sustained while he was working out, and not from the victim’s nails.


The DNA analysis showed no profile was obtained from the victim’s vulval swab, but did find some evidence to match Ahuja’s “control blood component’’ in one of her smear slides. “The reports fail to conclusively establish rape,’’ Ahuja’s plea said, suggesting it was “a consensual act’’.


Saying bail was a rule and not an exception as held in numerous Supreme Court judgements, Gupte said even medical evidence had “little against the actor’’. There was “no semen and blood’’
found on the victim in the panchanama on his or her clothes and at the scene of offence, he added.


Ahuja’s bail was rejected by the sessions court in July on the grounds that he may tamper with the witness because he was “rich and influential’’. But Gupte said: “How is he influential? He has just made his name in a few films. Besides she stays in Raigad district and will only come for the trial. He doesn’t know where she is.’’


The written bail plea, however, describes Ahuja as a “well-known film personality, having won several professional awards… with roots in society’’.


The hearing will continue in the court of Justice A P Deshpande on Wednesday, when the prosecutor will oppose the bail plea.


The maid had narrated the entire incident of “forcible sexual intercourse’’ to neighbours Adarsh Gupta and Sanjeet Kaur. The neighbours then took her to the police station at Oshiwara to file the complaint.

By Taran Adarsh, September 11, 2009 – 10:43 IST

Gangster movies – this genre has been done to death. Films like PARINDA [Vidhu Vinod Chopra] and SATYA [Ramgopal Varma] stand tall on this list. But, of late, the genre has taken a backseat since people aren’t too keen on watching bloodshed and the same old saga of an innocent taking to the world of crime.

BAABARR belongs to the same genre, yet is an exception. It shows how people, even kids, live by the gun and die by the gun. It tells you that crime never ends, it only changes faces. It tells of the wicked nexus between cops-politicians-gangsters and the deterioration of the law and order machinery. Also, this one’s not Mumbai-centric, but is set in Uttar Pradesh.

BY BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA.COM

BAABARR isn’t just bloodshed, but at the same time, isn’t for the faint-hearted either. There’s violence galore, in fact several sequences are brutal, and chances are a section of the movie-going audience [read families/ladies] might shy away from this experience.

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Yet, what makes BAABARR a must-watch experience is its story, the strong script [Ikram Akhtar] and the deftness with which director Ashuu Trikha has narrated the story. Without a shred of doubt, BAABARR is one of the most powerful films to come out of Bollywood in 2009.

A 12-year-old boy picks up a country made gun and shoots a man in cold blood. His eyes are devoid of any emotion. His heart exhibits no remorse. After shooting the person in broad daylight, he walks the streets of Aman Ganj with a gun in one hand. Everyone present in the market watches this young lad walk with no fear.

The boy, who started from the streets of Aman Ganj, had trespassed every barrier of crime. For the 10 years that followed, he traumatized one and all. His reign of fear terrorized everyone in the state, right from the common man to the Government. He was Baabarr [Sohum Shah].

When this reign of fear knew no bounds, the Government summoned a man to put an end to all of this: Encounter specialist S.P. Dwivedi [Mithun Chakraborty]. The order was simple, arrest him or kill him.

What’s the star cast like, that’s one question people generally pose when you ask them out for a movie. BAABARR has a new face – Sohum – but that exactly is its USP. Fortunately, he doesn’t carry the baggage of an image and that makes the character even more believable.

But there’s a flipside too. BAABARR is dark and gruesome and a few sequences can actually put you off, which, indirectly, also speaks of how impactful the film is.

Writer Ikram Akhtar’s script is power-packed and has several twists and turns in those 2 hours. In fact, even the final sequence of the film catches you unaware and that’s what makes BAABARR stand out from the crowd. The dialogues deserve special mention.

BAABARR is Ashuu Trikha’s best work so far. His handling of the dramatic sequences is commendable. Action scenes [Abbas Ali Moghul] are true to life. Cinematography [Suhass Gujarathi] deserves full marks. In fact, a film like BAABARR is difficult to shoot and it must’ve been a challenge for the DoP to give the right texture to the film.

Sohum lives the character of Baabarr and delivers a performance that you carry home after the show has concluded. The film would’ve fallen flat had it been entrusted to a lesser actor. Mithun Chakraborty is very good. In fact, this is amongst his better works. Om Puri stands out. This film should easily stride into ‘Best of Om Puri’ catalogue. Tinnu Anand is a revelation. Where was Tinnu all this while? Watch his death sequence in the film and it’s sure to give you gooseflesh. Shakti Kapoor is top notch. Again, he seems to be in form after a long, long time.

Sushant Singh is perfect for his part. Urvashi Sharma enacts her part with complete understanding. Govind Namdeo is competent. Mukesh Tiwari is, as always, good. Vivek Shauq, Vishwajeet Pradhan and Pratima Kazmi make an impact in brief roles.

On the whole, BAABARR is a captivating and powerful tale. Sure, there’s excessive violence, but there’s a reason behind it and that works in its favour. At the box-office, it has best chances in the Northern belt and also at single screens mainly.

August 7, 2009 2:24:54 PM IST
Ruhail, Bollywood Trade News Network

view KAMINEY videos

KAMINEY

His latest ‘Dhan Te Nan’ might have taken the industry by storm. But, it seems Vishal Bhardwaj is deeply disappointed at the attitude of the censor board that allotted his film an A certificate.

The maverick director says that his latest film has been given an unfair treatment by the censor board while some of the most violent films have been granted U/A certificate in the past.

Talking about his resentment at the press meet of the film, Vishal says, “I was quite disappointed when KAMINEY was given an adult certificate while the fact remains that we have tried to be responsible and have made sure not have scenes or dialogues that would go against the public sentiment. But, it seems the censor board has its own impression of my cinema and it was difficult to convince them about KAMINEY. I agree that my film showcases violence, but its something much more toned down than what we have seen on the silver screen earlier.”

He further adds, “The fact that my film is titled KAMINEY makes people think it is not a family film at all. But, let me make it clear, we have removed all such portions from the film that were not fit to be seen with the family, even after making these changes I am still granted an A certificate which is really hard to digest,” he ends.

The film which stars Shahid Kapoor in a double role promises to be a hit fare with the audiences and is all set to release on the 14th of this month.

GLAMSHAM.COM

ek
The producers of Ek promise, in an ad, to return the ticket money of disgruntled viewers. Read on to know what transpired when one dissatisfied viewer tried to reclaim his money

MUMBAI MIRROR; April 06, 2009

My name is Vikky Sukharilal Ujjinwar and this is my story. On Thursday, April 2, night I went to see Ek – The Power of One, at the New Empire cinema at VT which is near my office where I work as an office assistant. I bought an upper stall ticket for Rs 55/- and settled down to watch it.

Several things about the film did not appeal to me. For one, there was excessive violence, and then there were only two songs. The story line was totally faltu and the characters unappealing. By the time I left to go home to Mankhurd I was thoroughly disgusted with the film.

On my way home in the train I happened to spot a Sakaal newspaper and saw an ad by the makers of the film K Sera Sera, on page no.3 which said that they would reimburse the ticket price if anyone did not like the film. Strangely though there was no telephone number in the ad so I had no idea how I should go about it.

ek3

The next day (Friday, April 3) I began my enquiries and by evening I had managed to get a number for the office of K Sera Sera from someone who knew someone who knew a spot boy on some film.

At 4.30 pm I made my first call to the number (40427600) and was told that the director was in a meeting and I should call back in an hour.

At 5.15 pm I called again. This time I was told that the director had not come at all and I should call back the next day.

At 5.45 pm I made my third call which was transferred to someone called Sanjay who told me to come to the office, give in writing what I didn’t like about the film and collect my money.

At 5.47 pm I called again and was again told to come to the office the next day, he also gave me the office address.

On Saturday, April 4, I went to the office at Lokhandwala in Andheri and asked for my money. After being made to wait for 45 mins someone, not Sanjay who wasn’t in the office, spoke with me. He was curt, told me the whole world had liked the film and should they make another film for me? Finally he asked me to leave the office, and come back the next day with my letter. When I went back immediately with my complaint letter he took it and said they would review it to see if they found it valid. I was asked to phone and come back on Wednesday (April 8) or Thursday (April 9) for the cheque of the amount of my ticket Rs 55/-).

I cannot go back during the week and anyway what will I do with a cheque when I don’t have a bank account? I cannot understand why it should take them a week to return Rs 55/- to me. I am at a loss to know what to do next.

ek21

firaaq2

Did the founder of any religion ever preach violence? Did any of these holy men give his followers an allowance to kill people of other faiths? NO is the answer. Yet, our country has faced riots and serious communal tensions, most of them in the last 100 years. The people have prejudices against a particular community and with such an atmosphere, peace can never exist. Politicization of religion has further ruined the whole picture. Firaaq, a bold attempt by Nandita Das, throws light on the trauma faced after communal riots.

The story of the movie: The story is set in Ahmedabad, a month after the horrible Gujarat riots in 2002. The story has six parallel characters:
1. Muneera (Shahana Goswami), married and has newborn baby, and is shocked because her house was burnt down in the riots. She has a friend-her only confidante who is a Hindu.
2. Muneera’s husband Nowaz (Hanif) who is angry of being the victim of Hindu atrocities and along with few of his aides, wants to seek revenge
3. A battered Hindu housewife, Aarti (Deepti Naval), has an anti-Islamic husband Sanjay (Paresh Rawal). Aarti is helpless with whatever is happening around her. She feels the guilt but can’t overcome it.
4. Sameer Sheikh (Sanjay Suri), married to a Hindu lady Anuradha (Tisca Chopra), fears due to his Muslim identity, and wants to run away to Delhi.
5. Mohsin (Mohammad Samad), a young boy, who has lost almost all his family members, is wandering on the streets, searching for his missing father.
6. Khan (Naseeruddin Shah), a musician, a saint, who has his own set of ideas he strongly believes in until the riots turn his world upside down.

Firaaq’s first scene is scary. In fact, there hasn’t been any such chilling scene ever before in any film. While the film may be dubbed as showing only one side of the entire incident, it’ll be completely wrong to term it as pro-Muslim. Sure, the film shows the trauma faced by the Muslims, but it doesn’t become judgmental at any point or takes sides.

All characters in the film are well-sketched. The developments that take place in the narrative are highly engrossing. Also, the film is just 100 minutes long, but packs in so much in such a short duration! Though the film is highly applauding, it is the climax which seemed too inappropriate, especially in Shahana Goswami’s track.

Prior to the film’s release, a leading political party wanted to ban the film and criticized that a film of such a nature is being purposefully released during Elections with the help of a rival political party. I don’t know whether this is the truth but I am really glad that Firaaq released at such a time. The film shows the hard, bitter truth of the situation during the Gujarat riots. The film indirectly helps us get our facts right and choose the right government. Any government or its head involved in such heinous crimes and activities doesn’t deserve at all to get a chance to run the country at all.

firaaq

Performance-wise, each actor gave his best. However, four actors were outstanding-Shahana Goswami, Mohamaad Samad, Deepti Naval and Sanjay Suri. Shahana Goswami was splendid. She was completely into her character and it’s difficult to believe she was the same actor who was there in ‘Rock On!!’. She is surely a powerhouse of talent and has a long way to go!

Mohamaad Samad’s innocent sad face mirrors the harsh atrocities of the riots. Surely, a mind-blowing performance! Watch out for him in the final scene. Deepti Naval, too, was fantastic and did a perfect job. Same for Sanjay Suri. Both Suri and Naval essayed a role which was strong and both of them did total justice to it.

Naseeruddin Shah as always gives a splendid performance. Paresh Rawal was perfect as the Gujarati businessman. Tisca Chopra as usual did a great job. It was a great to see her after a long time, after Taare Zameen Par. Nowaz did a fine job and was amazing in the pre-climax. Amruta Subhash as Jyoti was excellent. Raghuveer Yadav, Dilip Joshi, Sumeet Raghavan and Sucheta Trivedi were good.

Rajat Dholakia and Piyush Kanojia’s background score completed suited the mood of the film. Ravi K Chandran, the talented cinematographer who has worked in Ghajini, Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi, Saawariya, Fanaa etc was outstanding. It’s great to see him working in such a film even after having worked in big-budget films.

Gautam Sen’s art direction was authentic. Same can be said for editing and sound design. Dialogues were brilliant and the film also has lots of Gujarati and English dialogues (sub-titles included) to give it a realistic feel.

Nandita Das and Shuchi Kothari wrote the story and screenplay of the film (the latter is from Ahmedabad and had witnessed the riots). Both of them came up with a brilliant plot, based on hundreds of real incidents which took place during the riots. What’s unique about the story is it focuses on the impact of fear, anxiety and prejudices on relationships during such turbulent times and not on the course of the riots.

Nandita Das’ direction was simply awesome. She had already proved her worth as an actor, having acted in many controversial films and being critically acclaimed. Her choice of story for her first film itself is worth applauding. She’ll surely be counted as one of the finest directors of Indian film industry in near future!

Some of the best scenes of the film:
1. The first scene
2. All scenes of Shahana’s track
3. Anuradha and Sanjay’s collision
4. Hanif and his aides’s plan to kill Mehul
5. Khan Sahab with the doctor
6. Sameer revealing his fears
7. Sameer at the omlet seller’s
8. Raghuvir Yadav injured
9. Hanif and his aides inside the shop and the chase by the cops
10. The final scene of Mohsin

On the whole, Firaaq is a brilliant docu-drama. It’s well executed and gives a wonderful account of the shameful incident. Some of the scenes shock and hits the viewer like a pile of bricks. It raises several questions, one of which being-is our country really secular?

My rating-**** out of 5!

(This review first appeared on MouthShut.com: http://www.mouthshut.com/review/Firaaq-164253-1.html)